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Full-Text Articles in Law

Medical Deduction Allowed For In-Home Personal Use, Danny A. Pannese Oct 2011

Medical Deduction Allowed For In-Home Personal Use, Danny A. Pannese

WCBT Faculty Publications

The Tax Court held that payments made to an elderly woman's providers of personal care that she required due to her diminished capacity qualified as long-term-care services and were therefore deductible under IRC ยง 213(d)(1)(C). Lillian Baral was diagnosed with dementia by her physician in 2004. The court agreed with Baral's estate that the amounts paid to the caregivers for their services were deductible as qualified long-term-care services. Baral was chronically ill, and the care was medically necessary to protect her from threats to her health and safety, as determined by her physician. The court also ...


Court Of Federal Claims Upholds Additional Sui Credit, Danny A. Pannese Feb 2010

Court Of Federal Claims Upholds Additional Sui Credit, Danny A. Pannese

WCBT Faculty Publications

The article discusses the decision in a tax court case that plaintiffs in consolidated tax refund cases were entitled to an additional state unemployment insurance (SUI) credit against their Federal Unemployment Tax Act (FUTA) tax liabilities for years 1991-1996. The dispute in the tax court case of E.P. Talent Services LP was addressed in a year 2004 Court of Federal Claims decision. It was ruled that the SUI credit is capped at over five percent of the taxpayer's total FUTA wage base.


Taxing Under The Influence? : Corruption And U.S. State Beer Taxes, Per G. Fredriksson, Stephan Gohmann, Khawaja Mamun May 2009

Taxing Under The Influence? : Corruption And U.S. State Beer Taxes, Per G. Fredriksson, Stephan Gohmann, Khawaja Mamun

WCBT Faculty Publications

This article examines the effect of state level corruption on state beer taxes in the United States. Our lobby group model predicts that corruption reduces the beer tax, but this effect is conditional on the level of alcohol-related vehicle deaths. Using a panel of state level data from 1982 to 2001, we find that increased corruption is associated with lower state beer tax rates. The magnitude of the effect, however, declines with increases in alcohol-related traffic deaths. Our findings suggest that future empirical work estimating the effect of alcohol taxes on alcohol-related traffic fatalities should treat alcohol taxes as endogenous.