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Full-Text Articles in Law

Information Overload, Multi-Tasking, And The Socially Networked Jury: Why Prosecutors Should Approach The Media Gingerly, Andrew E. Taslitz Jun 2015

Information Overload, Multi-Tasking, And The Socially Networked Jury: Why Prosecutors Should Approach The Media Gingerly, Andrew E. Taslitz

School of Law Faculty Publications

The rise of computer technology, the internet, rapid news dissemination, multi-tasking, and social networking have wrought changes in human psychology that alter how we process news media. More specifically, news coverage of high-profile trials necessarily focuses on emotionally-overwrought, attention-grabbing information disseminated to a public having little ability to process that information critically. The public’s capacity for empathy is likewise reduced, making it harder for trial processes to overcome the unfair prejudice created by the high-profile trial. Market forces magnify these changes. Free speech concerns limit the ability of the law to alter media coverage directly, and the tools available ...


High Expectations And Some Wounded Hopes: The Policy And Politics Of A Uniform Statute On Videotaping Custodial Interrogations, Andrew E. Taslitz Jun 2015

High Expectations And Some Wounded Hopes: The Policy And Politics Of A Uniform Statute On Videotaping Custodial Interrogations, Andrew E. Taslitz

School of Law Faculty Publications

Much has been written about the need to videotape the entire process of police interrogating suspects. Videotaping discourages abusive interrogation techniques, improves police training in proper techniques, reduces frivolous suppression motions because facts are no longer in dispute, and improves jury decision making about the voluntariness and accuracy of a confession. Despite these benefits, only a small, albeit growing, number of states have adopted legislation mandating electronic recording of the entire interrogation process. In the hope of accelerating legislative adoption of this procedure and of improving the quality of such legislation, the Uniform Law Commission (ULC), formerly the National Conference ...


Confessing In The Human Voice: A Defense Of The Privilege Against Self-Incrimination, Andrew E. Taslitz Jun 2015

Confessing In The Human Voice: A Defense Of The Privilege Against Self-Incrimination, Andrew E. Taslitz

School of Law Faculty Publications

ABSTRACT OF CONFESSING IN THE HUMAN VOICE: A DEFENSE OF THE PRIVILEGE AGAINST SELF-INCRIMINATION

By Andrew E. Taslitz

The privilege against self-incrimination has fallen on hard times. Miranda rights shrink, as do those more traditional “core” aspects of the privilege. Partly this is due to an implicit skepticism by the courts about the value of the privilege, despite their occasional explicit words of praise for its role in our constitutional scheme. Scholars largely, though not uniformly, agree that the privilege cannot be justified as a philosophical matter, viewing it as an unfortunate burden we are stuck with because of its ...


In Defense Of Disparate Impact: An Opportunity To Realize The Promise Of The Fair Housing Act, Valerie Schneider Jun 2015

In Defense Of Disparate Impact: An Opportunity To Realize The Promise Of The Fair Housing Act, Valerie Schneider

School of Law Faculty Publications

Abstract:

Twice in the past three years, the Supreme Court has granted certiorari in Fair Housing cases, and, each time, under pressure from civil rights leaders who feared that the Supreme Court might narrow current Fair Housing Act jurisprudence, the cases settled just weeks before oral argument. Settlements after the Supreme Court grants certiorari are extremely rare, and, in these cases, the settlements reflect a substantial fear among civil rights advocates that the Supreme Court’s recent decisions in cases such as Shelby County v. Holder and Fisher v. University of Texas are working to dismantle many of the protections ...


Mutual Recognition Based On Substituted Compliance: An Integral Component Of The Sec’S Mandate, Cheryl C. Nichols Jun 2015

Mutual Recognition Based On Substituted Compliance: An Integral Component Of The Sec’S Mandate, Cheryl C. Nichols

School of Law Faculty Publications

The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) must utilize mutual recognition based on substituted compliance to maintain American preeminence in the global securities market. In fact, mutual recognition based on substituted compliance facilitates the SEC’s ability to fulfill its statutory mandate-- to protect investors; maintain fair, orderly, and efficient markets; and facilitate capital formation. Currently, all US investors may have access to foreign exchanges in the global securities market without the protection of the U.S. federal securities laws; at a minimum, the SEC must take action to fulfill the first prong of its statutory mandate--to protect investors ...


Ferguson, The Rebellious Law Professor, And The Neoliberal University, Harold A. Mcdougall Iii Jun 2015

Ferguson, The Rebellious Law Professor, And The Neoliberal University, Harold A. Mcdougall Iii

School of Law Faculty Publications

Neoliberalism, a business-oriented ideology promoting corporatism, profit-seeking, and elite management, has found its way into the modern American university. As neoliberal ideology envelops university campuses, the idea of law professors as learned academicians and advisors to students as citizens in training, has given way to the concept of professors as brokers of marketable skills with students as consumers. In a legal setting, this concept pushes law students to view their education not as a means to contribute to society and the professional field, but rather as a means to make money. These developments are especially problematic for minority students and ...


Emergency Alert: This Is Not A Test! An International Disaster Relief Plan For Protecting Children And Families, Cynthia R. Mabry Jun 2015

Emergency Alert: This Is Not A Test! An International Disaster Relief Plan For Protecting Children And Families, Cynthia R. Mabry

School of Law Faculty Publications

There are more than 132,000,000 orphans worldwide. As a result of recent natural disasters in the United States and other countries, the number of orphans has increased. Recent events in the Gulf Coast in the United States, Haiti and Japan showed that thousands of children become separated from their parents or guardians when disasters strike. Family members were scattered during these tragedies. Many children were reunited with their families; but some children were sent to orphanages while others waited in classrooms for their family members to come for them. Many Haitian children were sent to foreign countries far ...


Once More Unto The Breach: An Analysis Of Legal, Technological And Policy Issues Involving Data Breach Notification Statutes, Dana J. Lesemann Jun 2015

Once More Unto The Breach: An Analysis Of Legal, Technological And Policy Issues Involving Data Breach Notification Statutes, Dana J. Lesemann

School of Law Faculty Publications

Once More Unto the Breach: An Analysis of Legal, Technological, and Policy Issues Involving Data Breach Notification Statutes

Dana J. Lesemann

Companies facing the loss of a laptop or a compromised server have long waged battles on several fronts: investigating the source of the breach, identifying potentially criminal behavior, retrieving or replicating lost or manipulated data, and putting better security in place, to name a few generalized steps. As recently as seven years ago, the broader consequences of a data breach were largely deflected from the party on whose resource the data resided and instead rested essentially on those whose ...


Social Change Requires Civic Infrastructure, Harold A. Mcdougall Iii Apr 2013

Social Change Requires Civic Infrastructure, Harold A. Mcdougall Iii

School of Law Faculty Publications

Article explores how civil society might become sufficiently organized to hold business accountable beyond consumer choice, and government beyond merely voting.


Judging Jena's Da: The Prosecutor And Racial Esteem, Andrew E. Taslitz Jun 2009

Judging Jena's Da: The Prosecutor And Racial Esteem, Andrew E. Taslitz

School of Law Faculty Publications

In the Jena 6 case, six African-American high school students were arrested for assault charges allegedly arising out of a series of confrontations between black and white students stemming from a black student's sitting under the "white tree" on school grounds. The Jena prosecutor successfully arranged for one of the Jena 6 to be tried as an adult, where he was convicted and exposed to the potential of a very harsh sentence. The prosecutor did not, however, proceed, or not proceed as harshly, against several white students who were purportedly involved in violence or threats of violence against black ...


Wrongly Accused Redux: How Race Contributes To Convicting The Innocent: The Informants Example, Andrew E. Taslitz Jan 2008

Wrongly Accused Redux: How Race Contributes To Convicting The Innocent: The Informants Example, Andrew E. Taslitz

School of Law Faculty Publications

This article analyzes five forces that may raise the risk of convicting the innocent based upon the suspect's race: the selection, ratchet, procedural justice, bystanders, and aggressive-suspicion effects. In other words, subconscious forces press police to focus more attention on racial minorites, the ratchet makes this focus every-increasing, the resulting sense by the community of unfair treatment raises its involvment in crime while lowering its willingness to aid the police in resisting crime, innocent persons suffer when their skin color becomes associated with criminality, and the police use more aggressive techniques on racial minorities in a way that raises ...


Bullshitting The People: The Criminal Procedure Implications Of A Scatalogical Term, Andrew E. Taslitz Aug 2007

Bullshitting The People: The Criminal Procedure Implications Of A Scatalogical Term, Andrew E. Taslitz

School of Law Faculty Publications

When, if ever, is it appropriate for the police to lie to members of the American People about their constitutional rights, mislead them about the rights' content, fail to mention them at all, or discourage their exercise? This paper seeks to answer that question by drawing on the philosophical literature on the nature and social value (or harm) of bullshit and on psychological research relevant to the same concept to craft what is ultimate a political position on the question.


Interstate Rendition And Illegal Return Of Fugitives, Herbert O. Reid Jan 1956

Interstate Rendition And Illegal Return Of Fugitives, Herbert O. Reid

School of Law Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.