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Whatever Did Happen To The Antitrust Movement?, Herbert J. Hovenkamp Dec 2018

Whatever Did Happen To The Antitrust Movement?, Herbert J. Hovenkamp

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

Antitrust in the United States today is caught between its pursuit of technical rules designed to define and implement defensible economic goals, and increasing calls for a new antitrust “movement.” The goals of this movement have been variously defined as combating industrial concentration, limiting the economic or political power of large firms, correcting the maldistribution of wealth, control of high profits, increasing wages, or protection of small business. High output and low consumer prices are typically unmentioned.

In the 1960s the great policy historian Richard Hofstadter lamented the passing of the antitrust “movement” as one of the “faded passions of ...


The Classical American State And The Regulation Of Morals, Herbert J. Hovenkamp Feb 2013

The Classical American State And The Regulation Of Morals, Herbert J. Hovenkamp

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

The United States has a strong tradition of state regulation that stretches back to the Commonwealth ideal of Revolutionary times and grew steadily throughout the nineteenth century. But regulation also had more than its share of critics. A core principle of Jacksonian democracy was that too much regulation was for the benefit of special interests, mainly wealthier and propertied classes. The ratification of the Fourteenth Amendment after the Civil War provided the lever that laissez faire legal writers used to make a more coherent Constitutional case against increasing regulation. How much they actually succeeded has always been subject to dispute ...


Tracking Berle's Footsteps: The Trail Of The Modern Corporation's Law Chapter, William W. Bratton, Michael L. Wachter Jan 2010

Tracking Berle's Footsteps: The Trail Of The Modern Corporation's Law Chapter, William W. Bratton, Michael L. Wachter

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.


The Immigration Paradox: Alien Workers And Distributive Justice, Howard F. Chang Jul 2008

The Immigration Paradox: Alien Workers And Distributive Justice, Howard F. Chang

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

The immigration of relatively unskilled workers poses a fundamental problem for liberals. While from the perspective of the economic welfare of natives, the optimal policy would be to admit these aliens as guest workers, this policy would violate liberal ideals. These ideals would treat these workers as equals, entitled to access to citizenship and to the full set of public benefits provided to citizens. If the welfare of incumbent residents determines admissions policies, however, and we anticipate the fiscal burden that the immigration of the poor would impose, then our welfare criterion would preclude the admission of relatively unskilled workers ...


The Disadvantages Of Immigration Restriction As A Policy To Improve Income Distribution, Howard F. Chang Jan 2008

The Disadvantages Of Immigration Restriction As A Policy To Improve Income Distribution, Howard F. Chang

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

In this Article, I argue that tax and transfer policies are more efficient than immigration restrictions as instruments for raising the after tax incomes of the least skilled native workers. Policies to protect these native workers frol1'l immigrant competition in the labor market do no better at promoting distributive justice and are likely to impose a greater economic burden on natives in the country of immigration than the tax alternative. These immigration restrictions are especially costly given the disproportionate burden that they place on households with working women, which discourages fel1'wle participation in the labor force. This burden ...


Wealth, Utility, And The Human Dimension, Jonathan Klick, Francesco Parisi Jan 2005

Wealth, Utility, And The Human Dimension, Jonathan Klick, Francesco Parisi

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

Functional law and economics, which draws its influence from the public choice school of economic thought, stands in stark contrast to both the Chicago and Yale schools of law and economics. While the Chicago school emphasizes the inherent efficiency of legal rules, and the Yale school views law as a solution to market failure and distributional inequality, functional law and economics recognizes the possibility for both market and legal failure. That is, while there are economic forces that lead to failures in the market, there are also structural forces that limit the law’s ability to remedy those failures on ...


Econometric Analysis Of U.S. Abortion Policy: A Critical Review, Jonathan Klick Jan 2004

Econometric Analysis Of U.S. Abortion Policy: A Critical Review, Jonathan Klick

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.


Pari Passu And A Distressed Sovereign's Rational Choices, William W. Bratton Jan 2004

Pari Passu And A Distressed Sovereign's Rational Choices, William W. Bratton

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.


Functional Law And Economics: The Search For Value-Neutral Principles Of Lawmaking, Francesco Parisi, Jonathan Klick Jan 2004

Functional Law And Economics: The Search For Value-Neutral Principles Of Lawmaking, Francesco Parisi, Jonathan Klick

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.


Preferences And Rational Choice: Introduction, Claire Oakes Finkelstein, Matthew D. Adler, Peter H. Huang Jan 2003

Preferences And Rational Choice: Introduction, Claire Oakes Finkelstein, Matthew D. Adler, Peter H. Huang

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.


Liberal Ideals And Political Feasibility: Guest-Worker Programs As Second-Best Policies, Howard F. Chang Jan 2002

Liberal Ideals And Political Feasibility: Guest-Worker Programs As Second-Best Policies, Howard F. Chang

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.


A Liberal Theory Of Social Welfare: Fairness, Utility, And The Pareto Principle, Howard F. Chang Jan 2000

A Liberal Theory Of Social Welfare: Fairness, Utility, And The Pareto Principle, Howard F. Chang

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.


Nest Eggs And Stormy Weather: Law, Culture, And Black Women's Lack Of Wealth, Regina Austin Jan 1997

Nest Eggs And Stormy Weather: Law, Culture, And Black Women's Lack Of Wealth, Regina Austin

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.


"An Honest Living": Street Vendors, Municipal Regulation, And The Black Public Sphere, Regina Austin Jan 1994

"An Honest Living": Street Vendors, Municipal Regulation, And The Black Public Sphere, Regina Austin

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.


"A Nation Of Thieves": Securing Black People's Right To Shop And To Sell In White America, Regina Austin Jan 1994

"A Nation Of Thieves": Securing Black People's Right To Shop And To Sell In White America, Regina Austin

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.


Black, Brown, Poor & Poisoned: Minority Grassroots Environmentalism And The Quest For Eco-Justice, Regina Austin, Michael H. Schill Jul 1991

Black, Brown, Poor & Poisoned: Minority Grassroots Environmentalism And The Quest For Eco-Justice, Regina Austin, Michael H. Schill

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.


The Antitrust Movement And The Rise Of Industrial Organization, Herbert J. Hovenkamp Jan 1989

The Antitrust Movement And The Rise Of Industrial Organization, Herbert J. Hovenkamp

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

The modern science of industrial organization grew out of a debate among lawyers and economists in the waning years of the nineteenth century. For Americans, the emergent business "trust" provoked a dialogue about how the law should respond. Many of the formal theories of industrial organization, such as the ruinous competition doctrine, the potential competition doctrine, and the post-classical concern about vertical integration, were actually borrowed from the law.

Anglo-American and European economists disputed the proper domain of theory and description in economic analysis. The British approach was exemplified Alfred and Mary Paley Marshall's Economics of Industry, published in ...


Developments In Law - Toxic Waste Litigation, Howard F. Chang Jan 1986

Developments In Law - Toxic Waste Litigation, Howard F. Chang

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.


Structure Of Labor Relations, Howard Lesnick Jan 1982

Structure Of Labor Relations, Howard Lesnick

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.