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Faculty Publications

2011

Discipline
Institution
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Articles 1 - 30 of 307

Full-Text Articles in Law

Securing Sovereign State Standing, Katherine Mims Crocker Dec 2011

Securing Sovereign State Standing, Katherine Mims Crocker

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Hybridizing Jurisdiction, Scott Dodson Dec 2011

Hybridizing Jurisdiction, Scott Dodson

Faculty Publications

Federal jurisdiction – the “power” of the court – is seen as something separate and unique. As such, it has a litany of special effects that define jurisdictionality as the antipode of nonjurisdictionality. The resulting conceptualization is that jurisdictionality and nonjurisdictionality occupy mutually exclusive theoretical and doctrinal space. In a recent Article in Stanford Law Review, I refuted this rigid dichotomy of jurisdictionality and nonjurisdictionality by explaining that nonjurisdictional rules can be “hybridized” with any – or even all – of the attributes of jurisdictionality.

This Article drops the other shoe. Jurisdictional rules can be hybridized, too, and in myriad …


Card-Check Laws And Public-Sector Union Membership In The States, Rafael Gely, Timothy D. Chandler Dec 2011

Card-Check Laws And Public-Sector Union Membership In The States, Rafael Gely, Timothy D. Chandler

Faculty Publications

We examine the impact of state card-check legislation on public-sector union membership. Based on an empirical analysis of data from 2000 to 2009, a time during which eight states enacted card-check legislation for public employees, we find significantly higher levels of public-sector union membership for states that passed card-check legislation in years after the laws were enacted relative to states that did not pass such laws. Moreover, average public-sector union membership increased for the states that passed card-check legislation after the laws were passed relative to their precard-check law union-membership levels.


Presidential Power And Constitutional Responsibility, Thomas P. Crocker Nov 2011

Presidential Power And Constitutional Responsibility, Thomas P. Crocker

Faculty Publications

Some constitutional theorists defend unbounded executive power to respond to emergencies or expansive discretionary powers to complete statutory directives. Against these anti-Madisonian approaches, this Article examines how the textual assignment of republican virtues helps to constitute and constrain the president's power. The Madisonian solution for constitutional constraint both creates institutions for unenlightened statesmen and relies on virtue to make governing possible. Constitutional responsibility is a consistent textual theme found in the command to "take Care that the Laws be faithfully executed," the responsibility to remain faithful to the office of president, and the obligation to preserve the Constitution itself. Although …


Can A Password Stop Police From Searching Your Cell Phone Incident To Arrest?, Adam M. Gershowitz Nov 2011

Can A Password Stop Police From Searching Your Cell Phone Incident To Arrest?, Adam M. Gershowitz

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Crime-Severity Distinctions And The Fourth Amendment: Reassessing Reasonableness In A Changing World, Jeffrey Bellin Nov 2011

Crime-Severity Distinctions And The Fourth Amendment: Reassessing Reasonableness In A Changing World, Jeffrey Bellin

Faculty Publications

A growing body of commentary calls for the Supreme Court to recalibrate its Fourth Amendment jurisprudence in response to technological and social changes that threaten the traditional balance between public safety and personal liberty. This Article joins the discussion, highlighting a largely overlooked consideration that should be included in any modernization of Fourth Amendment doctrine—crime severity.

The Supreme Court emphasizes that “reasonableness” is the “touchstone” of Fourth Amendment analysis. Yet, in evaluating contested searches and seizures, current Fourth Amendment doctrine ignores a key determinant of reasonableness, the crime under investigation. As a result, an invasive search of a suspected murderer …


Rethinking Extraordinary Circumstances, Scott Dodson Nov 2011

Rethinking Extraordinary Circumstances, Scott Dodson

Faculty Publications

This short essay for Northwestern University Law Review's Colloquy seeks to rationalize the "extraordinary circumstances" doctrine of Rue 60(b)(6) of the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure. The usual rule is that a movant for Rule 60(b)(6) relief must show extraordinary circumstances for that relief. Under the Ackermann rule (so named after the Supreme Court decision that spawned it), courts have held that any extraordinary circumstances cannot have been caused by the movant's own litigation conduct. I argue that the Ackermann rule, at its broadest, would be unjust to those litigants most in need of Rule 60(b)(6) relief and would overserve …


Modern Police Practices: Arizona V. Gant's Illusory Restriction Of Vehicle Searches Incident To Arrest, Seth W. Stoughton Nov 2011

Modern Police Practices: Arizona V. Gant's Illusory Restriction Of Vehicle Searches Incident To Arrest, Seth W. Stoughton

Faculty Publications

In 2009, the Supreme Court overturned thirty years of precedent with a decision that purported to dramatically cut back on the ability of law enforcement officers to conduct warrantless vehicle searches incident to the arrest of a vehicle occupant. Scholars and commentators celebrated Arizona v. Gant’s constraint of police, and subsequent scholarship has focused exclusively on peripheral concerns such as alternative justifications for warrantless searches and Gant’s effect on non-vehicle searches. This Note challenges the core assumption that Gant will substantially limit vehicle searches incident to arrest, contending that Gant is far more permissive than it appears. In most cases, …


The Judicial Power And The Inferior Federal Courts: Exploring The Constitutional Vesting Thesis, A. Benjamin Spencer Oct 2011

The Judicial Power And The Inferior Federal Courts: Exploring The Constitutional Vesting Thesis, A. Benjamin Spencer

Faculty Publications

Although the Constitution vests the "Judicial Power" of the United States in the Supreme Court and in any inferior courts that Congress establishes, both Congress and the Court have long propounded the traditional view that the inferior courts may be deprived cognizance of some of the cases and controversies that fall within that power. Is this view fully consonant with the history and text of Article III? One possible reading of those sources suggests that the Constitution vests the full Judicial Power of the United States in the inferior federal courts, directly extending to them jurisdiction over matters that Congress …


Lochner V. New York (1905) And Kennedy V. Louisiana (2008): Judicial Reliance On Adversary Argument, Douglas E. Abrams Oct 2011

Lochner V. New York (1905) And Kennedy V. Louisiana (2008): Judicial Reliance On Adversary Argument, Douglas E. Abrams

Faculty Publications

Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist called Lochner v. New York (1905) “one of the most ill-starred decisions that [the Supreme Court ever rendered.” The Justices’ deliberations preceding the 5-4 decision demonstrate the courts’ reliance on advocacy in the adversary system of civil and criminal justice. The stark imbalance between the state’s “incredibly sketchy” brief and Joseph Lochner’s sterling submission may have determined Lochner’s outcome, and thus may have changed the course of constitutional history, by leading two Justices to join the majority on the central question of whether New York’s maximum-hours law for bakery workers was a reasonable public health …


Back To The Drawing Board: Reexamining Accepted Criteria For Regional Structure Of The Courts Of Appeals, Martha Dragich Oct 2011

Back To The Drawing Board: Reexamining Accepted Criteria For Regional Structure Of The Courts Of Appeals, Martha Dragich

Faculty Publications

This article aims to determine which of the accepted structural features of the courts of appeals are essential by demonstrating that the federal courts are designed to assure the supremacy and uniformity of federal law, and that regional organization was intended to foster, not to negate, uniformity.


Uses And Abuses Of Textualism And Originalism In Establishment Clause Interpretation, Carl H. Esbeck Oct 2011

Uses And Abuses Of Textualism And Originalism In Establishment Clause Interpretation, Carl H. Esbeck

Faculty Publications

This article takes up the curious tale as to why the text and drafting record in the House and Senate were ignored by the Court in Everson, as well as what the text and debate can tell us about contemporary theories making the rounds. One theory of conservatives is that the Establishment Clause was not intended to prohibit support for religion so long as no religion is preferred.


Engaging The Legal Academy In Disaster Response, Susan Kuo, Davida Finger, Laila Hlass, Anne Hornsby, Rachel Van Cleave Oct 2011

Engaging The Legal Academy In Disaster Response, Susan Kuo, Davida Finger, Laila Hlass, Anne Hornsby, Rachel Van Cleave

Faculty Publications

This article discusses three models of law school engagement that have been used to respond to natural disasters. The three models discussed are a disaster law clinic, a course on disaster law, and a student-led initiative featuring non-credit, pro bono placements. Each model offers a conceptual approach for integrating community-based, justice-oriented initiatives into academic and clinical teaching. Taken as templates for a more permanent model of engagement in the area of post-disaster law and social justice, these models demonstrate that the legal academy can meet its service obligation to the community while training lawyers to better appreciate the central tenets …


Diagnosing Liability : The Legal History Of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, Deirdre M. Smith Oct 2011

Diagnosing Liability : The Legal History Of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, Deirdre M. Smith

Faculty Publications

This Article examines the origins of the unique relationship between the psychiatric diagnosis Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and the law and considers the implications of that relationship for contemporary uses of the diagnosis in legal settings. PTSD stands apart from all other diagnoses in psychiatry 's standard classification system, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM} , and is the focus of significant controversy within psychiatry, because its diagnostic criteria require a determination of causation. By diagnosing a person with PTSD, a clinician necessarily assigns responsibility to a specific event or agent for causing the person 's symptoms, …


Community Collateral Damage: A Question Of Priorities, Andrea Boyack Oct 2011

Community Collateral Damage: A Question Of Priorities, Andrea Boyack

Faculty Publications

Today’s soaring mortgage default rate and the uncertainty and delay associated with mortgage foreclosure proceedings threatens to cause financial tragedies of the commons in condominiums and homeowner associations across the country. Assessment defaults in privately governed communities result in an inequitable allocation of upkeep costs, and current law provides no way to prevent this spillover effect. But the collateral damages caused by delayed foreclosures and insufficient recoveries can be minimized by gradually increasing the priority position of the association lien.

In a majority of states, association liens are completely subordinate to the first mortgage lien. At foreclosure of the mortgage …


No Exception To The Rule: The Unconstitutionality Of State Immigration Enforcement Laws, Pratheepan Gulasekaram Oct 2011

No Exception To The Rule: The Unconstitutionality Of State Immigration Enforcement Laws, Pratheepan Gulasekaram

Faculty Publications

This issue brief presents the argument that state immigration enforcement laws, like Arizona's SB 1070, are unconstitutional. The Supreme Court's recent Whiting decision, upholding Arizona's E-Verify and business licensing law, does not not alter the analysis or conclusion with regards to broader enforcement type schemes.


Is The Copyright Public Domain Irrevocable?: An Introduction To Golan V. Holder, Tyler T. Ochoa Oct 2011

Is The Copyright Public Domain Irrevocable?: An Introduction To Golan V. Holder, Tyler T. Ochoa

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Environmental Tort Litigation In China, Tseming Yang, Adam Moser Oct 2011

Environmental Tort Litigation In China, Tseming Yang, Adam Moser

Faculty Publications

This paper provides an introduction to environmental tort law and practice in China, and briefly reviews China's 2009 Tort Law and its chapter on environmental torts. This paper, one of several, was prepared for U.S. Department of Justice and Environmental Protection Agency officials participating in a set of roundtables and discussions on environmental law enforcement in China with senior officials from the Supreme People's Procuratorate, Supreme People's Court, Ministry of Environmental Protection, Guangzhou Maritime Court, and environmental law scholars.


Copyright Versus The Public Domain: Does The Constitution Allow Congress To Take Works From The Public Domain And Replace Those With Private Exclusive Rights?, Dennis D. Crouch, Ted Wright Oct 2011

Copyright Versus The Public Domain: Does The Constitution Allow Congress To Take Works From The Public Domain And Replace Those With Private Exclusive Rights?, Dennis D. Crouch, Ted Wright

Faculty Publications

This case arose out of U.S. treaty obligations to restore copyright to foreign authors who had failed to comply with the pre-1989 formalities in the law. Section 514 of the Uruguay Round Agreement Act (URAA) restores those copyrights and, in doing so, allowed thousands of widely disseminated works to be removed from the public domain. Petitioners challenge the law—arguing that the law overreaches constitutional authority and violates speech rights protected by the First Amendment.


Should Laptops Be Banned? Providing A Robust Classroom Learning Experience Within Limits, Robin A. Boyle Oct 2011

Should Laptops Be Banned? Providing A Robust Classroom Learning Experience Within Limits, Robin A. Boyle

Faculty Publications

(Excerpt)
Technology abounds today’s law students. Laptops, iPods, iPads, and BlackBerrys are just a few of the newly developed modes of communication, notetaking, and music-storing devices that creep into our vocabulary – and students’ backpacks. Given the competitive nature of law school, students understandably bring laptops to class hoping to maximize their performance. Unfortunately for all involved, students use their laptops beyond the task of note-taking. The distractions that present themselves in class have led law professors to complain on various fora about the frequency of laptop use in the classroom. Some posit that students’ inappropriate use of laptops in …


Remarks Of William Van Alstyne On The Brandenburg Panel, William W. Van Alstyne Oct 2011

Remarks Of William Van Alstyne On The Brandenburg Panel, William W. Van Alstyne

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


International Arbitration And The Republic Of Colombia: Commercial, Comparative And Constitutional Concerns From A U.S. Perspective, S. I. Strong Oct 2011

International Arbitration And The Republic Of Colombia: Commercial, Comparative And Constitutional Concerns From A U.S. Perspective, S. I. Strong

Faculty Publications

This article undertakes the first comparative analysis of Colombian arbitration law in English, setting Colombian statutory and case law side by side with international and U.S. law to provide U.S. parties with the information they need to (1) evaluate the risks and benefits associated with entering into an arbitration agreement with a Colombian party and (2) establish the kinds of procedures needed to provide optimal protection of the arbitral process and any resulting award. Not only does this research discuss important comparative and commercial matters, it also considers how a unique type of constitutional challenge - the acción de tutela …


Beginning To End Racial Profiling: Definitive Solutions To An Elusive Problem, Kami Chavis Simmons Oct 2011

Beginning To End Racial Profiling: Definitive Solutions To An Elusive Problem, Kami Chavis Simmons

Faculty Publications

Remedying an elusive practice such as racial profiling remains a challenging issue for the judiciary and reformers must rely on other avenues for a solution. For example, even where evidence demonstrates that minorities are disproportionately stopped and searched, courts rarely recognize the victim's claim or provide relief. Thus, it is clear that courts will not be the catalysts of change. This Article argues that while courts may be reluctant to provide judicial remedies, police departments themselves should not ignore [minorities'] perceptions [of racial discrimination] and should take measures to reduce any possible profiling and increase partnerships with communities. An indication …


Brutal Choices In Curricular Design … Going Live: The Pros And Cons Of Live Critiques, Alison E. Julien Oct 2011

Brutal Choices In Curricular Design … Going Live: The Pros And Cons Of Live Critiques, Alison E. Julien

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


When Delegation Begets Domination: Due Process Of Administrative Lawmaking, Evan J. Criddle Oct 2011

When Delegation Begets Domination: Due Process Of Administrative Lawmaking, Evan J. Criddle

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Why There Is No Duty To Pay Damages: Powers, Duties, And Private Law, Nathan B. Oman Oct 2011

Why There Is No Duty To Pay Damages: Powers, Duties, And Private Law, Nathan B. Oman

Faculty Publications

This Article was part of a symposium on the rise of civil recourse theory. It contributes to this debate by defending a simple but counterintuitive claim: There is no duty to pay damages in either tort or contract law. The absence of such a duty provides a reason for believing that civil recourse provides a better account of private law than does corrective justice. Corrective justice is committed to interpreting private law as creating duties for wrongdoers to compensate their victims. In contrast, civil recourse sees the law as empowering plaintiffs against defendants. My argument is that a careful analysis …


Civil Recourse As Social Equality, Jason M. Solomon Oct 2011

Civil Recourse As Social Equality, Jason M. Solomon

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Arbitration Ambush In A Policy Polemic, Amy J. Schmitz Oct 2011

Arbitration Ambush In A Policy Polemic, Amy J. Schmitz

Faculty Publications

Arbitration has been demonized in the media and consumer protection debates, often without empirical support or consideration of its attributes. This has led to renewed efforts to pass the Arbitration Fairness Action, which would bar enforcement of pre-dispute arbitration clauses in consumer, employment, and civil rights contexts. It also inspired Dodd-Frank’s preclusion of arbitration clauses in mortgage contracts, along with the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s charge to prohibit or limit enforcement of pre-dispute arbitration agreements in consumer financial products and services contracts. Some of this negativity toward arbitration is warranted, especially in the wake of the United Supreme Court’s recent …


Reason And Passion: Justice Jackson And The Second Flag Salute Case (Part Ii), Douglas E. Abrams Oct 2011

Reason And Passion: Justice Jackson And The Second Flag Salute Case (Part Ii), Douglas E. Abrams

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


The Honor Of Private Law, Nathan B. Oman Oct 2011

The Honor Of Private Law, Nathan B. Oman

Faculty Publications

While combativeness is central to how our culture both experiences and conceptualizes litigation, we generally notice it only as a regrettable cost. This Article offers a less squeamish vision, one that sees in the struggle of people suing one another a morally valuable activity: the vindication of insulted honor. This claim is offered as a normative defense of a civil recourse approach to private law. According to civil recourse theorists, tort and contract law should be seen as empowering plaintiffs to act against defendants, rather than as economically optimal incentives or as a means of enforcing duties of corrective justice. …