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Full-Text Articles in Law

Recruiting The Right Candidate, Cynthia Bassett Jan 2024

Recruiting The Right Candidate, Cynthia Bassett

Faculty Publications

The market for hiring a law librarian has changed significantly over the last few years. Those on both sides of the equation are a little uncertain about the whole process, wondering when the job search should start, how much to expect in pay, and what aspects of a position are up for discussion. The challenge of a limited pipeline of law librarians requires new approaches to recruiting.


No-Poach Agreements: An Overview Of Us, Eu, And National Case Law, Donald J. Polden Jan 2024

No-Poach Agreements: An Overview Of Us, Eu, And National Case Law, Donald J. Polden

Faculty Publications

The United States, European Union, and many other international jurisdictions have antitrust and competition laws that seek to prevent anticompetitive conduct concerning labor and employment relationships. However, for many years these prohibitions on restraints of trade in labor markets and employment relationships were not routinely and rigorously enforced by those jurisdictions. The lack of governmental attention to these labor market practices has changed in important ways in recent years. Across many jurisdictions, we are now seeing more intense attention to conduct that suppresses wages of workers and their freedom of job mobility to other comparable positions. From an international perspective, …


Appealing Magna Carta, Thomas J. Mcsweeney Dec 2023

Appealing Magna Carta, Thomas J. Mcsweeney

Faculty Publications

In 1999, Professor Richard Helmholz published Magna Carta and the Ius Commune, in which he argued that some of the ideas and language found in Magna Carta provide evidence that the early common law was engaging with the ius commune, the ancestor of modern civil law traditions. This Essay examines one piece of evidence highlighted by Helmholz and more recently by Professor Charles Donahue: that the Articles of the Barons, a preparatory document for Magna Carta, uses a phrase borrowed from canon law, appellatione remota (without possibility of appeal). Helmholz and Donahue pointed to its use as evidence that …


Laundering Police Lies, Adam Gershowitz, Caroline E. Lewis Dec 2023

Laundering Police Lies, Adam Gershowitz, Caroline E. Lewis

Faculty Publications

Police officers—like ordinary people—are regularly dishonest. Officers lie under oath (testilying), on police reports (reportilying), and in a myriad of other situations. Despite decades of evidence about police lies, the U.S. Supreme Court regularly believes police stories that are utterly implausible. Either because the Court is gullible, willfully blind, or complicit, the justices have simply rubber-stamped police lies in numerous high-profile cases. For instance, the Court has accepted police claims that a suspect had bags of cocaine displayed in his lap at the end of a police chase (Whren v. United States), that officers saw marijuana through a …


The Independent Agency Myth, Neal Devins, David E. Lewis Nov 2023

The Independent Agency Myth, Neal Devins, David E. Lewis

Faculty Publications

Republicans and Democrats are fighting the wrong fight over independent agencies. Republicans are wrong to see independent agencies as anathema to hierarchical presidential control of the administrative state. Democrats are likewise wrong to reflexively defend independent agency expertise and influence. Supreme Court Justices also need to break free from this trap; the ongoing struggle over independent agencies should be about facts, not partisan rhetoric.

This Article seeks to reframe the fight over independent agencies. By surveying executive branch and independent agency department heads and supervisors during the Obama (2014) and Trump (2020) administrations, we have assembled unique and expansive data …


Second Amendment Exceptionalism: Public Expression And Public Carry, Timothy Zick Nov 2023

Second Amendment Exceptionalism: Public Expression And Public Carry, Timothy Zick

Faculty Publications

In New York State Rifle & Pistol Ass’n v. Bruen, the Supreme Court recognized a right to carry firearms in public places. The scope of that right will depend on where, why, and how governments regulated public carry during the eighteenth and perhaps nineteenth centuries. The Court claimed that its turn to history for determining the scope of Second Amendment rights “accords with” and “comports with” how the Court has interpreted First Amendment rights. This Article examines and rejects that claim, both in general and specifically as it applies to the public exercise of Second Amendment rights. Although Bruen …


The Superfluous Rules Of Evidence, Jeffrey Bellin Nov 2023

The Superfluous Rules Of Evidence, Jeffrey Bellin

Faculty Publications

There are few American legal codifications as successful as the Federal Rules of Evidence. But this success masks the project’s uncertain beginnings. The drafters of the Federal Rules worried that lawmakers would not adopt the new rules and that judges would not follow them. As a result, they included at least thirty rules of evidence that do not, in fact, alter the admissibility of evidence. Instead, these rules: (1) market the rules project, and (2) guide judges away from anticipated errors in applying the (other) nonsuperfluous rules.

Given the superfluous rules’ covert mission, it should not be surprising that the …


Leveraging Technology To Promote Access To Justice, Amy A. Emerson Oct 2023

Leveraging Technology To Promote Access To Justice, Amy A. Emerson

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Doctors’ Duty To Provide Abortion Information, Michelle Oberman, Lisa Soleymani Lehmann Aug 2023

Doctors’ Duty To Provide Abortion Information, Michelle Oberman, Lisa Soleymani Lehmann

Faculty Publications

With abortion remaining legal in over half of the country and a proliferation of websites offering information on how to access abortion medications, ending an unwanted early-stage pregnancy remains surprisingly easy. That is, easy for those who know where to look. But not all patients have equal access to reliable information. This Article addresses the urgent downstream harms caused by the lack of access to abortion information, particularly among the most vulnerable Americans, and argues that, in view of these consequences, regardless of abortion’s legal status, clinicians have a duty to provide their patients with abortion information.

We begin with …


Abortion Counseling, Liability, And The First Amendment, Michelle Oberman, Katie Watson Aug 2023

Abortion Counseling, Liability, And The First Amendment, Michelle Oberman, Katie Watson

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Against Silence: Why Doctors Are Obligated To Provide Abortion, Michelle Oberman Aug 2023

Against Silence: Why Doctors Are Obligated To Provide Abortion, Michelle Oberman

Faculty Publications

As a lawyer, I have long been interested in the gap between law and the books and law in practice. In 2008, this curiosity led me to Latin America, where I began studying the impact of the world's most restrictive abortion bans. My first stop was Chile, which at the time banned abortion under all conditions–– there was not even an exception to save women's lives. Raised on the history of what happened when abortion was illegal in the United States prior to Roe v. Wade, I knew asking doctors to share their experiences was one way to gauge the …


Marvin Claims At Death, Patricia A. Cain Aug 2023

Marvin Claims At Death, Patricia A. Cain

Faculty Publications

In 1976, the California Supreme Court handed down its decision in Marvin v. Marvin, recognizing the enforcement of contract and equitable claims that could be asserted when an unmarried partnership was dissolved. Most states have followed the basic holding in Marvin, although important differences in state law have developed over time. Recently, the Uniform Law Commission has approved a uniform act dealing with these issues, the Uniform Cohabitants' Economic Remedies Act (UCERA)

Much has been written about the rights that unmarried partners can assert against each other. Most of the scholarship has focused on the rights that arise …


Does The Community Choice Aggregation Approach Advance Distributed Generation Development? A Case Study Of Municipalities In California, Robin M. Rotman, Jun Deng Aug 2023

Does The Community Choice Aggregation Approach Advance Distributed Generation Development? A Case Study Of Municipalities In California, Robin M. Rotman, Jun Deng

Faculty Publications

Globally, decentralized energy systems are gaining popularity due to their potential for energy accessibility, energy resilience, and sustainability benefits. Existing research on an energy system decentralization approach, community choice aggregation (CCA), shows its ability to lower energy costs and increase renewable electricity consumption for U.S. communities. Nevertheless, research on the relationship between CCA and distributed electricity generation development is lacking. This paper fills this gap by investigating if the CCA approach associates with distributed generation capacity interconnection in California municipalities. The finding shows that although the average capacity has increased for all municipalities throughout the study period, contrary to proponents’ …


References To Beatles Songs In Advocacy And Judicial Opinions, Douglas E. Abrams Jul 2023

References To Beatles Songs In Advocacy And Judicial Opinions, Douglas E. Abrams

Faculty Publications

This article surveys the indelible mark that the Beatles (Paul McCartney, John Lennon, George Harrison, and Ringo Starr) continue to leave on courts in the United States more than half a century after the quartet burst onto the American scene with their three television appearances on the Ed Sullivan Show in February of 1964, six years before the band’s breakup.


The New Ali Restatement And The Doctrine Of Non-Self-Executing Treaties, David Sloss Jun 2023

The New Ali Restatement And The Doctrine Of Non-Self-Executing Treaties, David Sloss

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Preventing Vicarious Trauma And Encouraging Self-Care In Clinical Legal Teaching, Deeya Haldar, Sarah Katz Jun 2023

Preventing Vicarious Trauma And Encouraging Self-Care In Clinical Legal Teaching, Deeya Haldar, Sarah Katz

Faculty Publications

Vicarious trauma, sometimes called “compassion fatigue” or “secondary trauma,” is a term for the effect that working with survivors of trauma may have on counselors, therapists, doctors, attorneys, and others who directly help them. Vicarious traumatisation refers to harmful changes that occur in professionals’ views of themselves, others, and the world as a result of exposure to the graphic or traumatic experiences of their clients. While it is unusual for law students to experience vicarious trauma in a clinical legal education setting, there are good reasons to introduce the concept of vicarious trauma and measures to prevent vicarious trauma through …


Adversarial Election Administration, Rebecca Green May 2023

Adversarial Election Administration, Rebecca Green

Faculty Publications

As Americans, we are conditioned to believe that involving partisans in the administration of elections is inherently problematic. Understandably. The United States is a major outlier; virtually every other developed democracy mandates nonpartisan election administration. Whether on the left or right— especially since the 2020 election—we are barraged with headlines about actual or feared partisanship on the part of those who run our elections. What this narrative misses, however, is a crucial and underrecognized fact: by design, partisans have always played central roles at every level of U.S. election administration. What is more, partisans are baked into the U.S. election …


What Lawyers Can Teach Their Employed Law Students About 'Impactful Legal Writing', Douglas E. Abrams May 2023

What Lawyers Can Teach Their Employed Law Students About 'Impactful Legal Writing', Douglas E. Abrams

Faculty Publications

This article concerns the value of teaching employed law students about the potency of “impactful legal writing” – legal writing that can have a substantial impact on someone other than the student writer. Much of the employer’s most instructive teaching about impactful legal writing occurs at the beginning of an assignment, rather than solely during review after the student has completed the assignment. This article identifies four ways an employed law student’s impactful writing when fulfilling assignments differs from the effect of students’ academic writing in law school. Each of the four ways enables the employer to deliver practical lessons …


Religion, Discrimination, And The Future Of Public Education, Derek W. Black May 2023

Religion, Discrimination, And The Future Of Public Education, Derek W. Black

Faculty Publications

The Supreme Court’s recent decisions regarding the free exercise of religion threaten fundamental changes to public education. On their face, these decisions are relatively narrow. They prohibit states from explicitly excluding religious schools from participating in states’ tuition subsidy programs, otherwise known as private school vouchers. But school choice advocates and some scholars argue that the rationale in these cases also extends to religious organizations that want to operate public charter schools.

While these changes would drain enormous resources from an already underfunded public education system, even more important interests are at stake: antidiscrimination and basic core curriculum. More specifically, …


Myth-Busting Restorative Justice: Uncovering The Past And Finding Lessons In Community, Aparna Polavarapu May 2023

Myth-Busting Restorative Justice: Uncovering The Past And Finding Lessons In Community, Aparna Polavarapu

Faculty Publications

A common narrative about modern restorative justice is that it is a revival of historic and indigenous justice practices that have been practiced around the world. Critics of this narrative call it a myth, arguing that the claim is overbroad and unsupported by existing evidence. Embedded in this conversation are questions about how to respect the contributions of indigenous traditions and avoid whitewashing. Such an overwhelmingly broad claim tends to lead to romanticization and whitewashing of indigenous traditions, serving the needs of largely white, Western advocates in yet another colonial endeavor. But ignoring the indigenous contribution to restorative justice altogether …


The Racialized Violence Of Police Canine Force, Madalyn K. Wasilczuk May 2023

The Racialized Violence Of Police Canine Force, Madalyn K. Wasilczuk

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Criminal Justice Reform And The Centrality Of Intent, Cynthia V. Ward May 2023

Criminal Justice Reform And The Centrality Of Intent, Cynthia V. Ward

Faculty Publications

The nationwide movement for criminal justice reform has produced numerous proposals to amend procedural and sentencing practices in the American criminal justice system. These include plans to abolish mandatory minimum schemes in criminal sentencing; address discrimination in charging, convicting, and sentencing; reform drug policy; rectify discriminatory policies and practices in policing; assist incarcerated individuals in re-entering society when released from prison; and reorganize our system of juvenile justice. But less attention has been given to reforming the substantive content of the criminal law—specifically, to addressing flaws in how the law defines the elements of criminal culpability and deploys them in …


Does Mitochondrial Replacement Therapy Violate Laws Against Human Cloning?, Kerry L. Macintosh Apr 2023

Does Mitochondrial Replacement Therapy Violate Laws Against Human Cloning?, Kerry L. Macintosh

Faculty Publications

All human beings have mitochondria within their cells that produce energy.1 Most of us inherit healthy mitochondria through the eggs of our mothers,2 but some of us are not so lucky. Mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) can cause these tiny organelles to function improperly and disrupt tissues that require a lot of energy, like the brain, kidney, liver, heart, muscle, and central nervous system.3 For example, a specific mtDNA mutation induces Leigh syndrome, a condition in which seizures and respiratory failure lead to decline in mental and motor skills, disabil- ity, and death.4 Mitochondrial replacement therapy (MRT) offers a solution …


The Financial Impact Of Lost Licenses In Texas, Colleen Chien Apr 2023

The Financial Impact Of Lost Licenses In Texas, Colleen Chien

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


The Texas Second Chance Non-Disclosure/Sealing Gap, Colleen Chien Apr 2023

The Texas Second Chance Non-Disclosure/Sealing Gap, Colleen Chien

Faculty Publications

Texas Gov. Code Chap. 411 allows individuals whose criminal records meet certain conditions to non-disclose or seal their records. Ascertaining, then applying the law to the criminal profiles of Texans with convictions or deferred adjudications, as reflected in the Texas Computerized Criminal History System database (CCH) obtained from the Texas Department of Public Safety (described in Appendix B), as well as a sample of 2,362 criminal histories, and then 4 extrapolating to the estimated population of 4.8M individuals in the state with conviction records and estimated population of 7M individuals in the state with any record we estimate the share …


Legal Order At The Border, Evan J. Criddle Apr 2023

Legal Order At The Border, Evan J. Criddle

Faculty Publications

For generations, the United States has grappled with high levels of illegal immigration across the U.S.-Mexico border. This Article offers a novel theoretical framework to explain why legal order remains elusive at the border. Drawing inspiration from Lon Fuller’s “interactional view of law,” I argue that immigration law cannot attract compliance unless it is general, public, prospective, clear, consistent, and stable; obedience with its rules is feasible; and the law’s enforcement is congruent with the rules as enacted. The flagrant violation of any one of these principles could frustrate the development of a functional legal order. Remarkably, U.S. immigration law …


Intersectional Management: An Analysis Of Cooperation And Competition On American Public Lands, Robin M. Rotman, Abigail M. Hunt Apr 2023

Intersectional Management: An Analysis Of Cooperation And Competition On American Public Lands, Robin M. Rotman, Abigail M. Hunt

Faculty Publications

The United States government holds public lands in trust for the whole of the American people. This article focuses on National Monuments under the Antiquities Act. It argues that the federal government should renew its approach to the management of these lands by incorporating principles of environmental justice and long- term environmental viability. The article begins by examining the historical and legal foundations of federal lands in the United States, with a focus on the Antiquities Act. It then reflects on recent litigation and political controversy surrounding Bears Ears National Monument and Grand Staircase–Escalante National Monument, to illustrate how the …


Trading Nonenforcement, Ryan Snyder Apr 2023

Trading Nonenforcement, Ryan Snyder

Faculty Publications

In recent years, federal agencies have increasingly used nonenforcement as a bargaining chip—promising not to enforce a legal requirement in exchange for a regulated party’s promise to do something else that the law doesn’t require. This Article takes an in-depth look at how these nonenforcement trades work, why agencies and regulated parties make them, and the effects they have on social policy. The Article argues that these trades pose serious risks: Agencies often use trading to evade procedural and substantive limits on their power. The trades themselves present fairness problems, both because they tend to reward large, well-connected firms and …


The Clinic As A Site Of Grounded Pedagogy, Madalyn K. Wasilczuk Apr 2023

The Clinic As A Site Of Grounded Pedagogy, Madalyn K. Wasilczuk

Faculty Publications

Legal education tends to focus on teaching students federal law from hefty casebooks, inculcating the ability to "think like lawyers." In a sea of Socratic lectures and hypotheticals, students often take refuge in clinics as an island of practical skills-building, client centeredness, and individual fulfillment. Yet even clinics sometimes fail to highlight for students how the place where they practice, with its particular political context and history, shapes their clients' lives and legal problems. This Article describes the law school clinic as a site of grounded pedagogy: a teaching method that centers the con­nection between local history and the present …


Real Mediation Systems To Help Parties And Mediators Achieve Their Goals, John M. Lande Apr 2023

Real Mediation Systems To Help Parties And Mediators Achieve Their Goals, John M. Lande

Faculty Publications

This article argues that it is time for a paradigm shift in our current general mediation theory because of numerous problems. Our current theory is incomplete at best and seriously misleading at worst. The traditional mediation models are oversimplified, poorly mapping onto the reality of practice. They combine multiple elements that are not necessarily correlated. Many practitioners ignore them because they are confusing or not helpful. People do not understand the theoretical meanings because the terms are not consistent with commonly understood language. Arguments about what is or is not real or good mediation have spawned unhelpful ideological divisions in …