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Articles 1 - 5 of 5

Full-Text Articles in Law

The Trial Brief, Edson R. Sunderland Jan 1909

The Trial Brief, Edson R. Sunderland

Book Chapters

Professor Sunderland writes in introduction to his chapter: "As this is not a book of practice, an extended discussion of the general subject of 'Preparation for Trial' would manifestly be out of place.... The purpose of this part is to outline a course of investigation suitable in preparing a case for trial and to suggest methods for making the materials so obtained readily available." [p.207]


Process, Edson R. Sunderland Jan 1909

Process, Edson R. Sunderland

Book Chapters

Professor Sunderland's chapter on Process: "Process, in the sense in which it is employed in the present title, means the writ, notice, or other formal writing, issued by authority of law, for the purpose of bringing defendant into a court of law to answer plaintiff's demands in civil action, although in a more technical and limited sense the term is frequently applied only to those writs or writings which issue out of a court." The chapter features an 8-page outline introductory.


Pleading, Edson R. Sunderland Jan 1909

Pleading, Edson R. Sunderland

Book Chapters

Professor Sunderland's 780-page chapter on Pleadings: "Pleadings are statements, in logical and legal form, of causes of action and grounds of defense, terminating in a single proposition affirmed on one side and denied on the other. They are intended to form the foundation of the proof to be submitted on the trial, and should advise the parties to an action what the opposite party relies upon either as a cause of action or defense or objection as the case may be." Preceded by a 41-page outline.


Prosecuting And District Attorneys, Henry M. Bates Jan 1909

Prosecuting And District Attorneys, Henry M. Bates

Book Chapters

Professor Bates defines his subject matter "Prosecuting and district attorneys are judicial officers of the state, within their respective districts, although not officers of the state at large. Under some statutes they are county officers, while under others they are not, but are circuit or district officers.... Like other attorneys, prosecuting and district attorneys are officers of the court; but they are not a part of the court because of their office." A two-page outline precedes the entry.


Principal And Agent, Edwin C. Goddard, Louis Lougee Hammon Jan 1909

Principal And Agent, Edwin C. Goddard, Louis Lougee Hammon

Book Chapters

Prof. Goddard's 500-page entry under the subject, co-authored with Louis L. Hammon. Preceded by a 15-page outline.