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Full-Text Articles in Law

Justice Frank Murphy And American Labor Law, Theodore J. St. Antoine Jan 2002

Justice Frank Murphy And American Labor Law, Theodore J. St. Antoine

Articles

Working people and disfavored groups were central concerns of Frank Murphy, the last Michigan Law School graduate to sit on the United States Supreme Court. In the pages of this Review, just over a half century ago, Archibald Cox wrote of him: "It was natural ...th at his judicial work should be most significant in these two fields [labor law and civil rights] and especially in the areas where they coalesce."' In this Essay, after a brief overview of Murphy the man, his days at the University of Michigan, and his career prior to the Court appointment, I shall review ...


A Footnote For Jack Dawson, James J. White, David A. Peters Jan 2002

A Footnote For Jack Dawson, James J. White, David A. Peters

Articles

Jack Dawson, known to many at Michigan as Black Jack, taught at the Law School from 1927 to 1958. Much of his work was published in the Michigan Law Review, where he served as a student editor during the 1923-24 academic year. We revisit his work and provide a footnote to his elegant writing on mistake and supervening events. In Part I, we talk a little about Jack the man. In Part II, we recite the nature and significance of his scholarly work. Part III deals briefly with the cases decided in the last twenty years by American courts on ...


Memorial: Beverley J. Pooley (1934-2001), Margaret A. Leary Jan 2002

Memorial: Beverley J. Pooley (1934-2001), Margaret A. Leary

Articles

Beverley J. Pooley died at the age of sixty-seven on August 23, 2001, of kidney failure due to complications from pancreatic cancer. His death came shockingly fast, for he had only learned how seriously ill he was the week before. The bare facts about Bev's life cannot begin to describe what he was to the local community, the University of Michigan, and the law school world. Born in England in 1934, he earned B.A. and LL.B. degrees from Cambridge University; and LL.M., S.J.D., and M.A. in Library Science degrees from the University of ...


This Is Gary (Ann C. Rosenfield Symposium In Tribute To Gary T. Schwartz), James E. Krier Jan 2002

This Is Gary (Ann C. Rosenfield Symposium In Tribute To Gary T. Schwartz), James E. Krier

Articles

The first time I met Gary, he fell asleep. This was in the spring of 1969. Gary and I were working as lawyers in Washington, D.C., and each of us had recently accepted offers to join the faculty of the UCLA School of Law. When I learned of our current shared location and future destination, I called Gary and invited him to dinner at my apartment in Georgetown. We ate and drank and talked long into the night, until Gary checked out. Later he woke up and left.


Chief Judge Proctor Hug, Jr. And The Split That Didn't Happen, Arthur D. Hellman Jan 2002

Chief Judge Proctor Hug, Jr. And The Split That Didn't Happen, Arthur D. Hellman

Articles

Judge Procter Hug, Jr. became Chief Judge of the Ninth Circuit on March 1, 1996. Nine months earlier, eight Senators from five western states had introduced Senate Bill 956. The purpose of the bill, as stated in its title, was "to divide the ninth judicial circuit of the United States into two circuits." If the bill had been enacted, it would have been only the third time in the 104-year history of the federal courts of appeals that a circuit was split. And it would have been the first time that Congress had divided a circuit without waiting for a ...