Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Law Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Series

Articles

1978

University of Minnesota Law School

Articles 1 - 5 of 5

Full-Text Articles in Law

In Pursuit Of Excellence -- A History Of The University Of Minnesota Law School, Part Iii: The Fraser Years -- A Time Of Excellence And Innovation, Robert Stein Jan 1978

In Pursuit Of Excellence -- A History Of The University Of Minnesota Law School, Part Iii: The Fraser Years -- A Time Of Excellence And Innovation, Robert Stein

Articles

The first two articles in this series described the development of the University of MinnesotaLaw School under Deans William S. Pattee' and William Reynolds Vance.2 Dean Pattee had provided thesteady andaccommodatingleadershipneeded to lay theground- work for the years of ascendancy under Dean Vance. During his eight-year tenure at Minnesota, the most important of the many improvements Dean Vance had made was in the quality of the fac- ulty. Withatalentforrecognizingtheearlymanifestationsofscho- lastic excellence, Vance had attracted to the law school professors who developed into some of the leading scholars of their day. The work of Vance and these professorsmade the stillyoung ...


In Pursuit Of Excellence -- A History Of The University Of Minnesota Law School, Part Ii: The Vance Years -- A Time Of Ascendancy, Robert Stein Jan 1978

In Pursuit Of Excellence -- A History Of The University Of Minnesota Law School, Part Ii: The Vance Years -- A Time Of Ascendancy, Robert Stein

Articles

The first article in this series described the first two decades of the University of Minnesota Law School as a period marked by an accommodating and cautious regime.' The next decade, in contrast, was marked by a demanding and ambitious administration whose reforms altered the face of the school at a pace that remains unparalleled in the history of the institution. The first dean, William S. Pattee, had provided a firm foundation for legal education at the University but had sometimes compromised the quality of his vision because of the exigencies of the moment.


United States Ratification Of The Human Rights Covenants, David Weissbrodt Jan 1978

United States Ratification Of The Human Rights Covenants, David Weissbrodt

Articles

On October 5, 1977, President Carter signed the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, I and the Interna- tional Covenant on Civil and Political Rights.2 On that day, the Presi- dent promised to promptly transmit the two treaties to the Senate for ratification. In so doing, he drew a parallel between the "lofty standard of liberty and equality" embodied in the American Declara- tion of Independence and the principles of international human rights reflected in the United Nations Charter. 3


Reference Of Juvenile Offenders For Adult Prosecution: The Legislative Alternative To Asking Unanswerable Questions, Barry C. Feld Jan 1978

Reference Of Juvenile Offenders For Adult Prosecution: The Legislative Alternative To Asking Unanswerable Questions, Barry C. Feld

Articles

DRAWING ON SOCIAL SCIENCE RESEARCH AND EMPIRICAL EVALUATIONS OF JUDICIAL WAIVER ADMINISTRATION IN MINNESOTA AND ELSEWHERE, IT IS ARGUED THAT JUDICIAL WAIVER STATUTES REQUIRE JUVENILE COURTS TO MAKE INDIVIDUALIZED DETERMINATIONS AS TO A YOUTH'S AMENABILITY TO TREATMENT AND THE DANGER TO SOCIETY POSED BY THE YOUTH'S RETENTION WITHIN THE JUVENILE SYSTEM THAT, USING CURRENT METHODS OF CLINICAL PREDICTION, SIMPLY CANNOT BE MADE WITH AN ACCEPTABLE DEGREE OF ACCURACY. HOWEVER, IT IS BELIEVED THAT ACTUARIAL METHODS BASED ON PRESENT OFFENSE AND PAST RECORD CAN BE USED TO IDENTIFY IN ROUGH TERMS THOSE JUVENILES LIKELY TO RECIDIVATE AND, ACCORDINGLY, POSE ...


In Pursuit Of Excellence -- A History Of The University Of Minnesota Law School, Part I: The Pattee Years -- A Time Of Accommodation, Robert Stein Jan 1978

In Pursuit Of Excellence -- A History Of The University Of Minnesota Law School, Part I: The Pattee Years -- A Time Of Accommodation, Robert Stein

Articles

In September 1888, William S. Pattee, the newly elected dean of the University of Minnesota's infant law department,' began, with the help of lecturers from the practicing bars of Minneapolis and St. Paul, to educate some 67 '"young gentlemen of zeal and promise' 2 in the law. Ninety years later, the University of Minnesota Law School continues this mission, with 62 full-or part-time faculty members, for the benefit of about 750 students. During this period, the school has been shaped by the administrations of six deans, has conferred over 7,500 J.D. or LL.B. degrees,3 has ...