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Full-Text Articles in Law

Why The Supreme Court Has Fashioned Rules Of Standing Unique To The Establishment Clause, Carl H. Esbeck Oct 2009

Why The Supreme Court Has Fashioned Rules Of Standing Unique To The Establishment Clause, Carl H. Esbeck

Faculty Publications

The U.S. Supreme Court will hear oral argument this fall in Salazar v. Buono, No. 08-472, a matter that involves a Latin cross located in the Mojave National Preserve located in Southeastern California and operated by the National Park Service. First placed there as a memorial to American’s who served in WWI, this Christian symbol is said to violated the Establishment Clause of the First Amendment. Before reaching the merits, however, the Court must first pass on the question of standing to sue. The plaintiff, Frank Buono, is a former employee of the National Park Service and objects ...


The Impact Of News Coverage On Conflict: Toward Greater Understanding, Richard C. Reuben Oct 2009

The Impact Of News Coverage On Conflict: Toward Greater Understanding, Richard C. Reuben

Faculty Publications

This article develops an approach for the empirical study of the news media’s impact on the conflict that it covers. While mass communications research has studied how the news media covers conflict, it has not taken the next step of assessing the impact of that coverage. This article contends that such an inquiry is necessarily an inter-disciplinary task, and joins conflict theory with mass communications research to identify the kinds of questions that may be empirically tested to determine whether the news media is having a constructive or destructive effect on the conflict that it covers.


Is Novelty Obsolete? Chronicling The Irrelevance Of The Invention Date In U.S. Patent Law, Dennis D. Crouch Oct 2009

Is Novelty Obsolete? Chronicling The Irrelevance Of The Invention Date In U.S. Patent Law, Dennis D. Crouch

Faculty Publications

This paper presents a normative study of patent applicant use of invention-date rights during ex parte prosecution.


In With The New, Out With The Old: Expanding The Scope Of Retroactive Amelioration, S. David Mitchell Oct 2009

In With The New, Out With The Old: Expanding The Scope Of Retroactive Amelioration, S. David Mitchell

Faculty Publications

The legislative decision to amend a statute and reduce a sentence but not to apply it retroactively to pending prosecutions or to finalized convictions is in accord with the principles of retroactivity, but contrary to legitimate goals of punishment, i.e. deterrence and retributivism. Genarlow Wilson, convicted at seventeen of aggravated child molestation, a felony, for consensual oral sex with a fifteen-year old classmate, was sentenced to a mandatory minimum of ten years. While his appeal was pending, the Georgia Legislature reclassified the conduct as a misdemeanor and reduced the sentence to a maximum of one year but decided not ...


Nil: The Value Of Patents In A Major Crisis Such As An Influenza Pandemic, Dennis D. Crouch Oct 2009

Nil: The Value Of Patents In A Major Crisis Such As An Influenza Pandemic, Dennis D. Crouch

Faculty Publications

This essay focuses on the role of patents in relation to a potential global crisis such as an influenza pandemic or other public health crisis. I argue that patent rights will be largely ignored during an epidemic and that any post-crisis compensation would likely be low when compared to traditional patent rewards or settlements entered under threat of injunctive relief. In some situations, such as use of a patented invention by a state or local government, a patentee may have no recourse. Part III of the essay raises a separate issue that stems from the relatively long time frame for ...


Longmeyer Exposes Or Creates Uncertainty About The Duty To Inform Remainder Beneficiaries Of A Revocable Trust, David M. English, Turney P. Berry, Dana G. Fitzsimons Jr. Oct 2009

Longmeyer Exposes Or Creates Uncertainty About The Duty To Inform Remainder Beneficiaries Of A Revocable Trust, David M. English, Turney P. Berry, Dana G. Fitzsimons Jr.

Faculty Publications

This article discusses the surprising Longmeyer decision, handed down by the Supreme Court of Kentucky earlier this year in which a predecessor trustee was held to have a duty to give certain notifications to former remainder beneficiaries of a revocable trust. The authors then examine how Longmeyer might have been decided in other states and under other statutory schemes. The article concludes with observations concerning when certain notices to trust beneficiaries may be conducive to effective trust administration and suggestions to those who administer trusts on how best to comply with beneficiary notice requirements.


Legal Writing: Sense And Nonsense, Douglas E. Abrams Oct 2009

Legal Writing: Sense And Nonsense, Douglas E. Abrams

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Federal And State Judicial Selection In An Interest Group Perspective, Rafael Gely, Michael E. Solimine Jul 2009

Federal And State Judicial Selection In An Interest Group Perspective, Rafael Gely, Michael E. Solimine

Faculty Publications

The literature on judicial selection systems has given considerable attention to the role that politicians and their parties - through their legislative roles - have played in the adoption and operation of these judicial selection systems. Less attention, however, has been given to both the effect that interest groups, broadly defined, have in the creation and implementation of judicial selection systems and the effect that these systems have on the strategies adopted by interest groups to accomplish their goals. This Article seeks to fill this gap. Using the framework advanced by William M. Landes and Richard A. Posner in their seminal article ...


The Sounds Of Silence: Are U.S. Arbitrators Creating Internationally Enforceable Awards When Ordering Class Arbitration In Cases Of Contractual Silence Or Ambiguity?, S. I. Strong Jul 2009

The Sounds Of Silence: Are U.S. Arbitrators Creating Internationally Enforceable Awards When Ordering Class Arbitration In Cases Of Contractual Silence Or Ambiguity?, S. I. Strong

Faculty Publications

This article addresses a gap in the scholarly literature by comparing interpretive methodologies used by U.S. arbitrators to those used by international arbitrators to determine whether and to what extent U.S.-based class awards are enforceable outside the United States. Since many courts and arbitrators have claimed an analogy between consolidated and class arbitration, the article also considers whether such an analogy is appropriate as a matter of law and policy to identify whether the traditional disinclination to order consolidation can or should be extended to class proceedings. This second portion of the article is applicable to both ...


Forward: Sandra Day O'Connor, Earl F. Nelson, And State Judicial Selection And Retention Systems, R. Lawrence Dessem Jul 2009

Forward: Sandra Day O'Connor, Earl F. Nelson, And State Judicial Selection And Retention Systems, R. Lawrence Dessem

Faculty Publications

In difficult cases, in unpopular cases, in cases that may draw criticism from the executive branch of government, the legislature, the media, or the general populace, it is essential that judges be insulated from public pressure. However much we believe in the strength and integrity of the human spirit, we cannot expect judges to do justice without establishing an institutional framework that guarantees them that their next decision, however loathsome or unpopular, will not be their last.


How Not To Seek An Award Of Attorney's Fees, Douglas E. Abrams Jul 2009

How Not To Seek An Award Of Attorney's Fees, Douglas E. Abrams

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Personal Autonomy And Vacatur After Hall Street, Richard C. Reuben Apr 2009

Personal Autonomy And Vacatur After Hall Street, Richard C. Reuben

Faculty Publications

This article analyzes the implications of the U.S. Supreme Court’s landmark decision in Hall Street Associates v. Mattel, Inc., 128 S.Ct. 1396 (2008), in which the Court said that arbitration parties may not contract for substantive judicial review of arbitration under the Federal Arbitration Act. The article contends that Hall Street Associates was rightly decided as a matter of dispute resolution process characteristics and values theory because it preserves arbitration’s central virtue of finality. It further argues that the Court’s insistence on the exclusivity of the FAA’s statutory grounds for vacatur should spell the ...


But 'Will It Write'? How Writing Sharpens Decision-Making, Douglas E. Abrams Apr 2009

But 'Will It Write'? How Writing Sharpens Decision-Making, Douglas E. Abrams

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Research In International Commercial Arbitration: Special Skills, Special Sources, S. I. Strong Jan 2009

Research In International Commercial Arbitration: Special Skills, Special Sources, S. I. Strong

Faculty Publications

Experts agree that international commercial arbitration relies far more heavily on written advocacy than litigation does, yet very few practitioners and arbitrators have ever received any specialized training in how to research and present written arguments in this unique area of law. Newcomers to the field are particularly disadvantaged, since the legal authorities used in international commercial arbitration are unique and novices often do not know how to find certain materials, if they are even aware that these items exist. This article helps deepen the understanding of the practice of international commercial arbitration by describing how experienced international advocates and ...


Learning From Cooperative Negotiators In Wisconsin, John M. Lande Jan 2009

Learning From Cooperative Negotiators In Wisconsin, John M. Lande

Faculty Publications

To negotiate constructively from the outset of a matter, some lawyers use a "Cooperative" process, giving parties an additional process option, especially if parties believe that mediation or Collaborative practice is not suitable. Cooperative practice offers parties the opportunity to have lawyers represent them in an interest-based process governed by a negotiation agreement-while retaining ready access to litigation if needed, without losing their lawyers as in Collaborative practice. Cooperative practice can increase interest-based negotiation in direct negotiation between lawyers, increase efficiency and satisfaction with negotiation, and influence the general legal culture to incorporate problem-solving in everyday practice more often.


Trading In The Marketplace Of Ideas: Letters-To-The-Editor And Op-Ed Articles (Part Ii), Douglas E. Abrams Jan 2009

Trading In The Marketplace Of Ideas: Letters-To-The-Editor And Op-Ed Articles (Part Ii), Douglas E. Abrams

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Protestant Dissent And The Virginia Disestablishment, 1776-1786, Carl H. Esbeck Jan 2009

Protestant Dissent And The Virginia Disestablishment, 1776-1786, Carl H. Esbeck

Faculty Publications

In Everson v. Board of Education (1947), the Supreme Court elevated the events surrounding the disestablishment of the Anglican Church in Virginia during and soon after the American Revolution as a principal guide for the meaning of the Establishment Clause. The rule to come out of the Virginia experience is that support for religion should be voluntary thus, no active support by the government. An in-depth examination of James Madison's Memorial and Remonstrance opposing Patrick Henry's Assessment Bill is undertaken here not only because of its role in the Virginia disestablishment, but because it is the most important ...


The Phases And Faces Of The Duke Lacrosse Controversy: A Conversation, James E. Coleman, Angela Davis, K.C. Johnson, Lyrissa Lidsky Jan 2009

The Phases And Faces Of The Duke Lacrosse Controversy: A Conversation, James E. Coleman, Angela Davis, K.C. Johnson, Lyrissa Lidsky

Faculty Publications

The genesis of this panel is an essay I wrote arguing that the single moniker "Duke lacrosse controversy" encapsulates a broad, multi-faceted legal, political, and social controversy that more accurately consists of five related seriatim sub-controversies. Initially, it was a sexual assault case. An African-American woman, hired as an exotic dancer at a party thrown by members of the Duke University men's lacrosse team, reported to Durham police that she had been sexually assaulted by several white team members. The allegations quickly became a national story, tinged with issues of race, class, gender, privilege, and at some level, the ...


Nonconsensual Nonbinding = Nonsensical? Reconsidering Court-Connected Arbitration Programs, Amy J. Schmitz Jan 2009

Nonconsensual Nonbinding = Nonsensical? Reconsidering Court-Connected Arbitration Programs, Amy J. Schmitz

Faculty Publications

Policymakers have adopted programs mandating parties to submit their disputes to court connected arbitration hoping to garner efficiency benefits commonly associated with contractual Federal Arbitration Act (FAA) arbitration. Mandatory nonbinding arbitration, however, is ill-equipped for this task because it lacks the consensual core and finality of FAA arbitration. Instead, it often adds an inefficient layer to the litigation process and may harm those least able to protect themselves from coerced settlements or burdens of protracted litigation.


The Uniform Collaborative Law Act's Contribution To Informed Client Decision Making In Choosing A Dispute Resolution Process, John M. Lande, Forrest Steven Mosten Jan 2009

The Uniform Collaborative Law Act's Contribution To Informed Client Decision Making In Choosing A Dispute Resolution Process, John M. Lande, Forrest Steven Mosten

Faculty Publications

This Article describes how lawyers can implement the requirements of the Uniform Collaborative Law Act to obtain clients’ informed consent. The Act requires lawyers to obtain clients’ informed consent before undertaking a Collaborative representation but does not specify the information that lawyers must discuss with prospective Collaborative parties. To flesh out the Act’s requirements, this Article describes how lawyers should analyze the facts and parties’ interests, screen the appropriateness of dispute resolution processes, analyze the reasonably available dispute resolution options, and discuss the Collaborative process with clients. It specifically addresses privacy issues including privilege, confidentiality, and full disclosure requirements ...


A Downwind View Of The Cathedral: Using Rule Four To Allocate Wind Rights, Troy A. Rule Jan 2009

A Downwind View Of The Cathedral: Using Rule Four To Allocate Wind Rights, Troy A. Rule

Faculty Publications

The rapid pace of U.S. wind energy development is generating a growing number of conflicts over competing wind rights. The “wake” of a commercial wind turbine creates turbulence and unsteady wind flow that can reduce the productivity of other wind turbines situated downwind. Existing law is unclear as to whether a landowner who installs a wind turbine on its property is liable for the lost productivity of a downwind neighbor’s turbine resulting from such wake effects. Legal uncertainty as to how competing wind rights are shared among neighbors can induce wind energy developers to abandon otherwise lucrative turbine ...


A Middle Ground On Insider Trading, Thomas A. Lambert Jan 2009

A Middle Ground On Insider Trading, Thomas A. Lambert

Faculty Publications

For more than four decades, corporate law scholars have debated whether government should prohibit insider trading, commonly defined as stock trading on the basis of material, nonpublic information. Participants in this long-running debate have generally assumed that trading that decreases a stock's price should be treated the same as trading that causes the price to rise: either both forms of trading should be regulated or neither should. I argue for a middle-ground position in which "price-decreasing insider trading" (sales, short sales, and purchases of put options on the basis of negative information) is deregulated, while "price-increasing insider trading" (purchases ...


A New History And Discussion Of 180-Day Exclusivity, Erika Lietzan, David E. Korn, Shaw W. Scott Jan 2009

A New History And Discussion Of 180-Day Exclusivity, Erika Lietzan, David E. Korn, Shaw W. Scott

Faculty Publications

This is the third in a series of articles on 180-day exclusivity. The first article traced the history of 180-day exclusivity from 1984 through its amendment in 2003 and court cases in 2004. A second article, published by two of the authors in 2007, updated the earlier piece through the end of 2006 but was arranged by issue rather than in a chronology. This article, which includes a third author, provides a comprehensive resource on 180-day exclusivity for old abbreviated new drug applications (ANDAs) (but less detail in some places where the 2007 article may be referenced) and focuses more ...


Stories Of Crime, Trials, And Appeals In Civil War Era Missouri, Frank O. Bowman Iii Jan 2009

Stories Of Crime, Trials, And Appeals In Civil War Era Missouri, Frank O. Bowman Iii

Faculty Publications

This paper explores criminal appellate practice in Missouri from the time of statehood in 1821 until the 1870s, with particular focus on the decades before and after the Civil War. The article uses the stories of three trials in and around Columbia, Missouri - an attempted rape case against a slave that resulted in a lynching, a murder case against a white farmer that ended in his execution, and another murder case successfully appealed - to explore the legal culture of the period. All three trials involved two prominent central Missouri lawyers, James S. Rollins and Odon Guitar, who were also important ...


Anonymity In Cyberspace: What Can We Learn From John Doe?, Lyrissa Lidsky Jan 2009

Anonymity In Cyberspace: What Can We Learn From John Doe?, Lyrissa Lidsky

Faculty Publications

This Article examines the evolution of the law governing libel suits against anonymous “John Doe” defendants based on Internet speech. Between 1999 and 2009, courts crafted new First Amendment doctrines to protect Internet speakers from having their anonymity automatically stripped away upon the filing of a libel action. Courts also adapted existing First Amendment protections for hyperbole, satire and other non-factual speech to protect the distinctive discourse of Internet message boards. Despite these positive developments, the current state of the law is unsatisfactory. Because the scope of protection for anonymous Internet speech varies greatly by jurisdiction, resourceful plaintiffs can make ...


Nobody's Fools: The Rational Audience As First Amendment Ideal, Lyrissa Lidsky Jan 2009

Nobody's Fools: The Rational Audience As First Amendment Ideal, Lyrissa Lidsky

Faculty Publications

Assumptions about audiences shape the outcomes of First Amendment cases. Yet the Supreme Court rarely specifies what its assumptions about audiences are, much less attempts to justify them. Drawing on literary theory, this Article identifies and defends two critical assumptions that emerge from First Amendment cases involving so-called "core" speech. The first is that audiences are capable of rationally assessing the truth, quality, and credibility of core speech. The second is that more speech is generally preferable to less. These assumptions, which I refer to collectively as the rational audience model, lie at the heart of the "marketplace of ideas ...


Dr. Miles Is Dead. Now What?: Structuring A Rule Of Reason For Minimum Resale Price Maintenance, Thom Lambert Jan 2009

Dr. Miles Is Dead. Now What?: Structuring A Rule Of Reason For Minimum Resale Price Maintenance, Thom Lambert

Faculty Publications

This article critiques six approaches that have been proposed for evaluating minimum RPM and offers an alternative approach. The six approaches critiqued are (1) the Brandeisian, unstructured rule of reason; (2) Judge Posner's rule of per se legality; (3) the approach advocated by 27 states in the recent Nine West case; (4) the approach adopted by the Federal Trade Commission in that case; (5) the approach advocated by economists William Comanor and F.M. Scherer; and (6) the approach proposed in the Areeda & Hovenkamp Antitrust Law treatise. Finding each of these approaches deficient, the article proposes an alternative evaluative ...


Between A Rock And A Hard Place: Landlords, Latinos, Anti-Illegal Immigrant Ordinances, And Housing Discrimination, Rigel C. Oliveri Jan 2009

Between A Rock And A Hard Place: Landlords, Latinos, Anti-Illegal Immigrant Ordinances, And Housing Discrimination, Rigel C. Oliveri

Faculty Publications

In the face of federal inability to effectively police our national borders and to remove unauthorized immigrants, many local governments have recently sought to take measures into their own hands by passing anti-illegal immigrant ("AII") ordinances. These ordinances usually contain a combination of provisions restricting housing, employment, and public benefits for unauthorized immigrants, among other things.This Article focuses on AII provisions that are targeted at private rental housing, which typically take the form of sanctions against landlords who rent to unauthorized immigrants.


Participation And The Right To Health: Lessons From Indonesia, Sam F. Halabi Jan 2009

Participation And The Right To Health: Lessons From Indonesia, Sam F. Halabi

Faculty Publications

The right to participation is the “the right of rights” — the basic right of people to have a say in how decisions that affect their lives are made. All legally binding international human rights treaties explicitly recognize the essential role of participation in realizing fundamental human rights. While the substance of the human right to health has been extensively developed, the right to participation as one of its components has remained largely unexplored. Should rights-based health advocacy focus on participation because there is a relationship between an individual’s or a community’s active involvement in health care decision-making and ...