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Can International Law Provide Extra-Constitutional Protection For Excludable Aliens?, Louis B. Sohn Dec 1991

Can International Law Provide Extra-Constitutional Protection For Excludable Aliens?, Louis B. Sohn

Scholarly Works

This paper focuses on the problems of those who do not qualify for a regular admission as refugees, but are detained at the entrance point, or are detained in the United States after being released on temporary parole or pending repatriation. The thesis I shall try to defend is that these persons must be treated according to basic rules of humanitarian law; that they are entitled to be treated as human beings, regardless of any particular legislation or administrative regulations depriving them of basic legal protection granted to citizens and regular residents of the country.


Mindlessness And The Law, Paul J. Heald, James E. Heald Sep 1991

Mindlessness And The Law, Paul J. Heald, James E. Heald

Scholarly Works

No less an authority than Milton Friedman has argued that improving the realism of assumptions in economic theory, although hardly essential to establishing the absolute validity of the theory (purely an empirical question), may offer several benefits. First, a “restructuring” (to use Posner's term) of an assumption may help explain divergences between predicted and observed results. Second, an explanation of why a seemingly unrealistic assumption does not destroy the predictive value of a theory may strengthen the theory by connecting it to “a more general theory that applies to a wider variety of phenomena . . . and has failed to be ...


A Slave's Marriage: Dowry Or Deposit, Alan Watson Sep 1991

A Slave's Marriage: Dowry Or Deposit, Alan Watson

Scholarly Works

This articles examines the concept of dowry among marriage of slaves in ancient Rome.


The Georgia Jury And Negligence: The View From The Bench, R. Perry Sentell Jr. Sep 1991

The Georgia Jury And Negligence: The View From The Bench, R. Perry Sentell Jr.

Scholarly Works

It is virtually impossible to think seriously about torts and not think of negligence; it is virtually impossible to think seriously about negligence and not think of the jury. The staples of the common-law negligence system--striking a liability profile, and assessing a causal loss--are the staples of the civil jury province. The historic inevitableness of the fact, however, has never put the matter beyond reflection, scrutiny, reconsideration, challenge, nor controversy. Assuredly, controversy.


Behind The Parity Debate: The Decline Of The Legal Process Tradition In The Law Of Federal Courts, Michael L. Wells Jul 1991

Behind The Parity Debate: The Decline Of The Legal Process Tradition In The Law Of Federal Courts, Michael L. Wells

Scholarly Works

Whether there is parity between federal and state courts has become a central question in the law of federal courts, dividing judges and commentators into two well-defined camps. Although the issue rarely arose thirty years ago, it now enters into virtually every discussion of the rules concerning access to federal court for constitutional claims. On one side of the debate, advocates of broad federal jurisdiction over constitutional challenges to state action claim that federal courts are better than state courts at adjudicating these controversies. On the other side, advocates of state court jurisdiction insist that state courts are fully adequate ...


Federal Intellectual Property Law And The Economics Of Preemption, Paul J. Heald Jul 1991

Federal Intellectual Property Law And The Economics Of Preemption, Paul J. Heald

Scholarly Works

In the Sears/Compco decisions, the United States Supreme Court established that federal patent law preempts state prohibitions on the mere copying of unpatented product configurations. After years of harsh criticism by commentators, apparent rejection by the lower courts, and allegedly inconsistent treatment by the Court itself, most had proclaimed this principle far beyond resuscitation. The Court, however, miraculously resurrected the principle in Bonito Boats, Inc. v. Thunder Craft Boats, Inc., which unanimously reaffirmed that intentional copying often should be privileged under federal law. In so doing, the Court provided an expressly economic rationale to be used in future determinations ...


Experimenting With The "Right To Die" In The Laboratory Of The States, Thomas A. Eaton, Edward J. Larson Jul 1991

Experimenting With The "Right To Die" In The Laboratory Of The States, Thomas A. Eaton, Edward J. Larson

Scholarly Works

The purposes of this Article are twofold. Our first purpose is to reexamine the legal foundations of a patient's right to refuse treatment. The Court's equivocal handling of the federal constitutional issues in Cruzan v. Director, Missouri Department of Health invites a closer look at state constitutional, statutory and common law. The source of the underlying right will affect state experimentation with substantive and procedural rules in this area. Our second purpose is to describe the current status of the states' experiments with the right to die. That is, we elaborate in more detail on the state constitutional ...


Should Michigan Rule Of Evidence 703 Be Revised?, Brian Benner, Ronald L. Carlson Jun 1991

Should Michigan Rule Of Evidence 703 Be Revised?, Brian Benner, Ronald L. Carlson

Popular Media

Technical witnesses regularly assist the fact-finding process in Michigan trials. Jury or bench trials in federal and state courts routinely feature the appearance of experts. Properly policed by our courts, few forms of testimony hold more promise for advancing the truth-seeking function of American litigation. The expanding presence of experts raises hard questions. Are the Michigan rules in turn with modern needs? Should the state rule controlling the basis for expert opinion be aligned with the federal pattern? If Michigan Rule of Evidence 703 could stand revision, does proper alteration require significant additions not presently contained in either state or ...


Justice Scalia And The Commerce Clause: Reflections Of A State Tax Lawyer, Walter Hellerstein Jun 1991

Justice Scalia And The Commerce Clause: Reflections Of A State Tax Lawyer, Walter Hellerstein

Scholarly Works

This paper considers Justice Scalia's substantive views of the restraints that the commerce clause imposes on state taxation. My purpose is to examine critically Justice Scalia's dormant or "negative" commerce clause analysis of the state tax issues on which he has opined and to draw from that examination some general conclusions about Justice Scalia's commerce clause jurisprudence.


The Finnigan Case: A Reply To Vogelenzang's Second Stage Apportionment Of Unitary Income, Walter Hellerstein, Jerome R. Hellerstein May 1991

The Finnigan Case: A Reply To Vogelenzang's Second Stage Apportionment Of Unitary Income, Walter Hellerstein, Jerome R. Hellerstein

Scholarly Works

In this article J. Hellerstein and W. Hellerstein take issue with arguments made by Pierre Vogelenzang in a special report in Tax Notes that California’s second-stage apportionment of the income of a unitary business amounts to unconstitutional extraterritorial taxation. In the Finnigan case, the California State Board of Equalization held that sales made into California by a corporation that is not itself taxable in California, but is a member of a unitary group that is taxable there, are includable in the numerator of the state’s sales factor in apportioning income. The authors defend this result, arguing that the ...


The Constitutional Case Against Intracircuit Nonacquiescence, Dan T. Coenen May 1991

The Constitutional Case Against Intracircuit Nonacquiescence, Dan T. Coenen

Scholarly Works

A cornerstone of the United States Constitution is its separation of powers among the legislative, executive, and judicial branches of the national government. The Framers of the Constitution reasoned that separated powers would guard against tyranny by blocking the undue concentration of authority in any single governmental department. In crafting the Constitution, however, the Framers could not anticipate every dispute their scheme of separated powers might engender. One modern separation-of-powers conflict not specifically anticipated by the constitutional text involves so-called "intracircuit nonacquiescence.”

Intracircuit nonacquiescence occurs when executive-branch decision makers refuse to follow a circuit court's precedents even when acting ...


Advocate, Spring 1991, Vol. 26, No. 2, Office Of Communications And Public Relations Apr 1991

Advocate, Spring 1991, Vol. 26, No. 2, Office Of Communications And Public Relations

News @ UGA School of Law

INSIDE

Coif Inducts Class of 1990

First Verner Chaffin Scholar Named

LL.M. Alumni Group Organized

Moot Court Victories

King & Spalding Fund Scholarship

Calendar

Class Notes


Broken Promises Revisited: The Window Of Vulnerability For Surviving Spouses Under Erisa, Camilla E. Watson Mar 1991

Broken Promises Revisited: The Window Of Vulnerability For Surviving Spouses Under Erisa, Camilla E. Watson

Scholarly Works

While there are pervasive problems with the current ERISA legislation, this Article will focus only on survivor benefits and will concentrate in particular on the short-term marriage provision. This Article will maintain that facial neutrality notwithstanding, the short-term marriage provision is discriminatory in effect, grounded in dubious logic, and unsupportable from a historical perspective. In order to demonstrate this, this Article will delve thoroughly into the historical development of ERISA, with particular emphasis on the survivor benefit provisions. The depth to which this Article plumbs the general development of ERISA is intended to demonstrate the weak historical foundation on which ...


Domestic Violence Against Women: A Comparative Analysis Of Remedies Under The American And Indian Legal Systems, Anita Elizabeth Jacob Ninan Jan 1991

Domestic Violence Against Women: A Comparative Analysis Of Remedies Under The American And Indian Legal Systems, Anita Elizabeth Jacob Ninan

LLM Theses and Essays

The purpose of this thesis is to compare the legal remedies available to women who are the victims of domestic violence in the United States and India and analyze whether the existing laws in the two systems are effective and sufficient in combating this growing problem. Domestic violence against women is a reality. It haunts the female species form the cradle to the grave, manifesting itself in sociocultural crime peculiar to some societies like India, such as female feticide, female infanticide, bride burning dowry deaths, and wife battering (both a developing country like India and an economically developed country like ...


United States Government Contract: The Unilateral Act Of Government Contracting, Sawvalak Chulpongstorn Jan 1991

United States Government Contract: The Unilateral Act Of Government Contracting, Sawvalak Chulpongstorn

LLM Theses and Essays

The debarment, suspension, and termination of the Government contract can cause a sudden financial ruin or bankruptcy of the contractor. Consequently, the question of whether the Government’s debarment, suspension, and termination is proper can be of vital importance. This thesis, in consequence, will focus on two major problem areas of the unilateral act of the government in contracting with the contractor. The first problem area is whether the debarment and suspension meet the requirement of due process of law. The second problem area is whether or not the government’s right to terminate the contract is proper or legal ...


A Comparison Of Civil Procedure Practices In Products Liability Actions Between The United States And Japan: Underlying Reasons For Basic Differences, Akio Hayashi Jan 1991

A Comparison Of Civil Procedure Practices In Products Liability Actions Between The United States And Japan: Underlying Reasons For Basic Differences, Akio Hayashi

LLM Theses and Essays

Both the U.S. and Japan are highly industrialized countries and many of the same products are used in both countries. So, why is there such a large difference in the number of products liability suits filed?

The present work explores the differences in the American and Japanese legal systems with a focus on products liability claims. The conclusion will show that it is the difference in the two countries applicable civil procedures that explain the disparity in suits.


The Regulation Of Medical Devices: A Comparative Study Of American And Eec Law, Martine Carliese Pijnappels Jan 1991

The Regulation Of Medical Devices: A Comparative Study Of American And Eec Law, Martine Carliese Pijnappels

LLM Theses and Essays

Part I of this thesis will describe the regulation of medical devices in the EEC. Before coming to the actual medical device legislation, a description of the legislative system in Europe will be given, to the extent that it is relevant for the Directives on medical devices. After dealing with the history of Directives and their current contents, the status of the Directives and their future prospects will be discussed. Part II will deal with the regulation of medical devices in the United States under the Food Drug & Cosmetic Act as amended by Medical Device Amendments of 1976. First, the ...


Time For A New Approach: Why The Judiciary Should Disregard The "Law Of The Circuit" When Confronting Nonacquiescence By The National Labor Relations Board, Rebecca H. White Jan 1991

Time For A New Approach: Why The Judiciary Should Disregard The "Law Of The Circuit" When Confronting Nonacquiescence By The National Labor Relations Board, Rebecca H. White

Scholarly Works

The National Labor Relations Board has been criticized for its nonacquiescence policy, under which the Board interprets the national Labor Relations Act, issues an order, and then defends this order before a circuit court that previously had rejected the Board's interpretation of the Act. In this Article, Professor Rebecca White begins by stating that the NLRB's nonacquiescence policy is both lawful and proper. From this basic premise, White then argues that courts of appeals should abandon the "law of the circuit" doctrine when confronting Board nonacquiescence. She contends the policy concerns that justify application of the "law of ...


Against An Elite Federal Judiciary: Comments On The Report Of The Federal Courts Study Committee, Michael L. Wells Jan 1991

Against An Elite Federal Judiciary: Comments On The Report Of The Federal Courts Study Committee, Michael L. Wells

Scholarly Works

No doubt some reform of the federal courts is essential if they are to cope with the proliferation of litigation over the past thirty years and the resulting "congestion, delay, expense, and expansion" in the federal courts. While the problem may not amount to an "impending crisis", the burgeoning caseload surely poses a threat, at least in the long run, to the ability of the federal courts to function effectively. The hard question is not whether something should be done, but what to do about it. There is no shortage of interesting ideas. Some of the ideas that clamor for ...


The Canons Of Construction In Georgia: "Anachronisms" In Action, R. Perry Sentell Jr. Jan 1991

The Canons Of Construction In Georgia: "Anachronisms" In Action, R. Perry Sentell Jr.

Scholarly Works

Two initial observations may be tendered concerning the canons of interpretations: The literature, almost uniformly, discredits them; the courts, almost uniformly, employ them. The purpose of this effort is to reflect some sense of background, and illustratively to marshal the Georgia experiences with what are perhaps the three most famous canons of interpretation.


Congress's Paramount Role In Setting The Scope Of Federal Jurisdiction, Michael L. Wells Jan 1991

Congress's Paramount Role In Setting The Scope Of Federal Jurisdiction, Michael L. Wells

Scholarly Works

Article III presents a conundrum for scholars seeking a coherent explanation of the federal courts' role in our system of government. On the one hand, the framers set up the judiciary as a separate branch with jurisdiction over federal law and other matters of federal interest. They granted federal judges life tenure and undiminishable salary in order to preserve judicial independence from executive and legislative pressure. It is evident from these provisions that the framers saw a need for a strong national judiciary. At the same time, article III explicitly leaves to Congress the decision whether to create any lower ...


The Vices Of Originality, Paul J. Heald Jan 1991

The Vices Of Originality, Paul J. Heald

Scholarly Works

Lately, the Constitution has become an unwelcome guest at the parties of those claiming rights lying on the periphery of intellectual property. Two terms ago, in Bonito Boats, Inc. v. Thunder Craft Boats Inc., the Court held that federal patent law preempted a Florida statute forbidding the reproduction of boat hulls by use of any direct molding process. The Court's decision effectively provided a limited constitutional right to copy unpatented product shapes and designs. Most recently, in Feist Publications, Inc. v. Rural Telephone Service, Inc. the Intellectual Property Clause was held to create positive restraints on Congress's ability ...


Protecting The Marine Environment From Vessel Source Pollution: Unclos Iii And Beyond, Daniel M. Bodansky Jan 1991

Protecting The Marine Environment From Vessel Source Pollution: Unclos Iii And Beyond, Daniel M. Bodansky

Scholarly Works

The vessel-source pollution provisions of UNCLOS III have become the reference point for virtually all discussions of marine environmental jurisdiction and, although the Convention is not yet in force, have arguably become norms of customary international law. Moreover, these environmental provisions are likely to come under increased scrutiny and assume even greater importance should the disputes over the seabed mining provisions of the Convention be resolved. Thus far, these disputes have stood in the way of ratification by many advanced industrialized countries, including the United States. The U.S. Congress recently rejected several international conventions dealing with oil spills on ...


Governmental Inaction As A Constitutional Tort: Deshaney And Its Aftermath, Thomas A. Eaton, Michael Wells Jan 1991

Governmental Inaction As A Constitutional Tort: Deshaney And Its Aftermath, Thomas A. Eaton, Michael Wells

Scholarly Works

DeShaney v. Winnebago County Department of Social Services is the Supreme Court's first major effort to define the scope of state and local governments' affirmative obligations under the fourteenth amendment. The Court rejected liability against a county welfare agency and a caseworker for failing to prevent a father from severely beating his four-year-old son. The Court intimated that constitutional affirmative duties exist only where the plaintiff is in the state's custody. Scholarly commentary reads the case as announcing a sweeping prohibition against the imposition of affirmative duties in other contexts. Professors Eaton and Wells demonstrate that the DeShaney ...