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Full-Text Articles in Law

Arbitral Justice: The Demise Of Due Process In American Law, Thomas E. Carbonneau Jan 1995

Arbitral Justice: The Demise Of Due Process In American Law, Thomas E. Carbonneau

Journal Articles

Arbitration consists of a process for resolving disputes in a final and binding manner outside the traditional court system. The rules that govern arbitration provide for flexible proceedings and do not require the strict application of legal rules.

Owing largely to the holdings of the U.S. Supreme Court, arbitration law and procedure have emerged from the obscurity of specialized practice and entered the adjudicatory mainstream.

In 1925, with the enactment of the U.S. Arbitration Act, the U.S. Congress declaredthe rehabilitation of arbitral justice and dispute resolution. These provisionsanticipated, in effect, the modern, world-wide legislative legitimization ofarbitration. Primarily ...


Reconsidering Flood V. Kuhn, Stephen F. Ross Jan 1995

Reconsidering Flood V. Kuhn, Stephen F. Ross

Journal Articles

Within the academia, two very different groups of legal scholars have devoted a great deal of attention to Flood v. Kuhn. Those specializing in sports law have either attached Flood as a ridiculous decision that improperly distinguished between baseball and other professional sports, or have praised it for waging guerrilla warfare on the idea that Section 1 of the Sherman Act should apply to intra-league arrangements by owners of the professional sports teams. Those viewing Flood through the lens of statutory interpretation perceive the decision as adhering rigidly to the principle of stare decisis; this rigidity has been both praised ...


The Modern Parol Evidence Rule And Its Implications For New Textualist Statutory Interpretation, Stephen F. Ross, Daniel Trannen Jan 1995

The Modern Parol Evidence Rule And Its Implications For New Textualist Statutory Interpretation, Stephen F. Ross, Daniel Trannen

Journal Articles

Part I of this article focuses on the history of parol evidence in contract interpretation, describing both Williston's and Corbin's definition and application of the parol evidence rule. With the adoption of the UCC and the Second Restatement, we suggest that Corbin's position-that expansion of admissibility of parol evidence will more accurately reflect the drafters' manifest intentions and minimize the judge's personal biases-has been accepted by experts and legislators alike. In Part II, we summarize the use of legislative history in statutory interpretation, focusing on the rise of the New Textualism and its critique of the ...


The Limited Relevance Of Plain Meaning, Stephen F. Ross Jan 1995

The Limited Relevance Of Plain Meaning, Stephen F. Ross

Journal Articles

In this essay, the author takes the position that linguists' principal expertise - ascertaining how language is used by ordinary speakers of English - is often of little value in interpreting controversial non-criminal federal statutes. Although linguistic techniques might still aid in understanding their meaning, the author's thesis is that extrinsic evidence that is known and accessible to this small sub-community - such as legislative history, established norms of construction, and other evidence about the context in which the legislation arose - is more likely than linguistic analysis to help an outside judge shed light on what Congress meant and how the statute ...


Rededication Panel Discussion On Gender Equality And Intercollegiate Athletics, Stephen F. Ross, Karol Kahrs, Fred Heinrich Jan 1995

Rededication Panel Discussion On Gender Equality And Intercollegiate Athletics, Stephen F. Ross, Karol Kahrs, Fred Heinrich

Journal Articles

This article is a transcript of a panel discussion in which Professor Stephen F. Ross, Associate Athletic Director Karol Kahrs, and Fred Heinrich participated entitled "Sports and the Law," at the Rededication of the University of Illinois College of Law. The panel discussion centered on the issue of gender equity in intercollegiate athletics. Title IX of the Education Amendments Act requires institutions receiving federal funding to provide equal educational opportunity for students regardless of gender. The panel discussion focused on the impact of Title IX and the University of Illinois's efforts to comply with the requirements.