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The Three Waves Of Married Women's Property Acts In The Nineteenth Century With A Focus On Mississippi, New York And Oregon, Joseph A. Custer Jan 2014

The Three Waves Of Married Women's Property Acts In The Nineteenth Century With A Focus On Mississippi, New York And Oregon, Joseph A. Custer

Faculty Publications

This paper concentrates on three states that enacted married women's property acts during the nineteenth century: Mississippi, New York, and Oregon. Each state, starting with Mississippi, enacted acts that reflect a different wave. While Chused's indexing and classification schema have been groundbreaking and extremely helpful in providing order and a basic understanding of what types of married women's property acts were passed and when in the nineteenth century, in my opinion he did not clearly provide any underlying explanation or "why" for the passage of the acts.

This is not taking anything away from Chusad's substantial ...


Water Rights, Markets, And Changing Ecological Conditions, Jonathan H. Adler Jan 2012

Water Rights, Markets, And Changing Ecological Conditions, Jonathan H. Adler

Faculty Publications

Conventional environmentalist thought is suspicious of private markets and property rights. The prospect of global climate change, and consequent ecological disruptions, has fueled the call for additional limitations on private markets and property rights. This essay, written for the Environmental Law Symposium on 21st Century Water Law, presents an alternative view. Specifically, this essay briefly explains why environmental problems generally, and the prospect of changing environmental conditions such as those brought about by climate change in particular, do not counsel further restrictions on private property rights and markets. To the contrary, the prospect of significant environmental changes strengthens the case ...


Property And The Public Forum: An Essay On Christian Legal Society V. Martinez, B. Jessie Hill Jan 2010

Property And The Public Forum: An Essay On Christian Legal Society V. Martinez, B. Jessie Hill

Faculty Publications

Christian Legal Society v. Martinez is situated at the intersection of various, and arguably conflicting, lines of doctrine. In ultimately holding that the Hastings College of Law could decline to recognize the student chapter of the Christian Legal Society due to the group’s refusal to accept members who did not conform their beliefs and conduct to the principles of CLS (particularly regarding homosexuality),the Supreme Court was required to sort through a tangle of precedents involving free speech limitations in nonpublic for a, religious groups’ rights of equal access to school facilities, and freedom of expressive association.

Perhaps less ...


Taking Property Rights Seriously: The Case Of Climate Change, Jonathan H. Adler Jan 2009

Taking Property Rights Seriously: The Case Of Climate Change, Jonathan H. Adler

Faculty Publications

The dominant approach to environmental policy endorsed by conservative and libertarian policy thinkers, so-called "free market environmentalism" (FME), is grounded in the recognition and protection of property rights in environmental resources. Despite this normative commitment to property rights, most self-described advocates of FME adopt a utilitarian, welfare-maximization, approach to climate change policy, arguing that the costs of mitigation measures could outweigh the costs of climate change itself. Yet even if anthropogenic climate change is decidedly less than catastrophic - indeed, even if it net beneficial to the globe as whole - human-induced climate change is likely to contribute to environmental changes that ...


Common Law Environmental Protection: Introduction, Jonathan H. Adler, Andrew P. Morriss Jan 2008

Common Law Environmental Protection: Introduction, Jonathan H. Adler, Andrew P. Morriss

Faculty Publications

Today there is widespread dissatisfaction with many aspects of federal environmental law. The apparent success of early environmental regulations notwithstanding, many analysts and academics have begun to reexamine the potential of common law causes of action to supplement, if not supplant, portions of the existing regulatory regime. Yet whatever the failings of the environmental regulatory state, the common law has failings of its own, including the failure to protect many ecological resources in the period before the enactment of federal environmental law. This essay is the introduction to a paper-only symposium on Common Law Environmental Protection, forthcoming in the Case ...


Anti-Conservation Incentives, Jonathan H. Adler Jan 2008

Anti-Conservation Incentives, Jonathan H. Adler

Faculty Publications

Several recent empirical studies have indicated that the Endangered Specifies Act (ESA) discourages species conservation on private land. This is because the law encourages landowners to shoot, shovel and shut up before federal authorities discover the species are present or may move onto the land. Most worrisome, the studies suggest that the net effect of the ESA on private land could be negative. Habitat loss and fragmentation represent the greatest threat to endangered species because private land is indispensable to environmental conservation.


Conservation Cartels: How Competition Policy Conflicts With Environmental Protection, Jonathan H. Adler Feb 2006

Conservation Cartels: How Competition Policy Conflicts With Environmental Protection, Jonathan H. Adler

Faculty Publications

The alleged purpose of antitrust law is to improve consumer welfare by proscribing actions and arrangements that reduce output and increase prices. Conservation seeks to improve human welfare by maximizing the long-term productive use of natural resources, a goal that often requires limiting consumption to sustainable levels. While conservation measures might increase prices in the short run, they enhance consumer welfare by increasing long-term production and ensuring the availability of valued resources over time. That is true whether the restrictions are imposed by a private conservation cartel or a government agency. Insofar as antitrust law fails to take this into ...


Free And Green: A New Approach To Environmental Protection, Jonathan H. Adler Feb 2006

Free And Green: A New Approach To Environmental Protection, Jonathan H. Adler

Faculty Publications

Most Americans consider themselves environmentalists, yet most experts are dissatisfied with existing environmental regulations, which are both inefficient and inequitable. Worse, many don't serve environmental goals. This article outlines an alternative approach to environmental policy based on market institutions and property rights rather than central-planning and bureaucratic control. The aim is both to improve environmental protection and lessen the costs ? Economic and otherwise ? Of achieving environmental goals. It seeks to ensure that Americans' environmental values are advanced without sacrificing the individual liberties the American government was created to protect.

The problem with current regulatory approaches is not merely that ...


Back To The Future Of Conservation: Changing Perceptions Of Property Rights & Environmental Protection, Jonathan H. Adler Jan 2005

Back To The Future Of Conservation: Changing Perceptions Of Property Rights & Environmental Protection, Jonathan H. Adler

Faculty Publications

Property rights hold a central place in our Constitutional design and provide the foundation for America's market economy. Admiration of private property has not been universal, however. Some environmental scholars and policymakers have been particularly critical of classical liberal conceptions of private property on both theoretical and practical grounds, suggesting that traditional, classical liberal notions of property rights are incompatible with the demands of environmental protection. These perspectives influenced the development of command-and-control environmental regulation in the 1960s and 1970s. In recent years, however, the perception of private property's role in environmental conservation has begun to change. Disregard ...