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Articles 1 - 9 of 9

Full-Text Articles in Law

Taxation And Doing Business In Indian Country, Erik M. Jensen Jan 2008

Taxation And Doing Business In Indian Country, Erik M. Jensen

Faculty Publications

Furthering investment in Indian country (a term that includes, but is not limited to, reservations) is an important goal, but potential investors are hesitant - and with reason. One disincentive to invest is uncertainty about tax liability. Understanding taxation in Indian country requires knowledge not only of traditional tax law, but also of American Indian law principles dating from the early nineteenth century, and not many practitioners are up to that task. This article tries to make sense, as much as is possible, of the doctrines that have developed over the centuries.

The article first discusses some basics: the concept of ...


Indian Gaming On Newly Acquired Lands, Erik M. Jensen Jan 2008

Indian Gaming On Newly Acquired Lands, Erik M. Jensen

Faculty Publications

This symposium article examines the meaning of the term Indian lands - the lands that might become sites for Indian gaming-in the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act of 1988. At its core, the term is unambiguous: it includes reservations and other lands that, at the time of IGRA's enactment, were held in trust by the United States for the benefit of American Indian nations. But Indian lands can include much more. Indeed, it is possible for real estate having only the most tenuous historical connections with a tribe (perhaps having no connections at all) to become Indian lands. The treatment of ...


Chickasaw Nation: Interpreting A Broken Statute, Erik M. Jensen Feb 2006

Chickasaw Nation: Interpreting A Broken Statute, Erik M. Jensen

Faculty Publications

This report discusses the Supreme Court's 2001 decision in Chickasaw Nation v. United States, in which the Supreme Court interpreted a provision of the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act that contained contradictory phrases - one suggesting that Indian tribes were exempt from some occupational and excise taxes and one suggesting the contrary. The statute on its face made no sense, and the legislative history was of little help in resolving the ambiguity. Although the statute was clearly broken, the Court concluded that no ambiguity existed and that Congress did not intend to exempt tribes from those various wagering taxes. The author ...


American Indian Tribes And Secession, Erik M. Jensen Jan 2006

American Indian Tribes And Secession, Erik M. Jensen

Faculty Publications

Critics of American Indian law have often complained about federal interference in the internal affairs of American Indian nations. The author ponders how independent the critics really want American Indian nations to be and whether secession theory might help us think about the theory and practice of really independent American Indian nations.


Monroe G. Mckay And American Indian Law: In Honor Of Judge Mckay’S Tenth Anniversary On The Federal Bench, Erik M. Jensen Jan 2006

Monroe G. Mckay And American Indian Law: In Honor Of Judge Mckay’S Tenth Anniversary On The Federal Bench, Erik M. Jensen

Faculty Publications

This essay, written in honor of Judge Monroe G. McKay's tenth anniversary as a member of the United States Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit, considers the difficulty of justifying a separatist policy for the American Indian; examines the opinions authored by Judge McKay in American Indian law cases; and discusses the McKay opinions and the issue of separation.


Doing Business In Indian Country: Introduction To American Indian Law Concepts Affecting Taxation, Erik M. Jensen Jan 2003

Doing Business In Indian Country: Introduction To American Indian Law Concepts Affecting Taxation, Erik M. Jensen

Faculty Publications

This article describes some of the issues that will affect whether national, state, and tribal governments can tax investors who do business, or who invest in doing business, within Indian country (a term generally meaning American Indian reservations, although it can be broader than that).

Absent treaty language or express statutory language to the contrary, tribal members are subject to federal taxes of general application, such as the income tax. The Internal Revenue Code does contain some specific provisions exempting certain sorts of income, such as that from fishing-rights related activities, from taxation. In general, nonmembers of a tribe who ...


The Continuing Vitality Of Tribal Sovereignty Under The Constitution, Erik M. Jensen Jan 1999

The Continuing Vitality Of Tribal Sovereignty Under The Constitution, Erik M. Jensen

Faculty Publications

This article discusses James A. Porres III's essay, The Constitution of the United States Applies to Indian Tribes.


American Indian Law Meets The Internal Revenue Code: Warbus V. Commissioner, Erik M. Jensen Jan 1998

American Indian Law Meets The Internal Revenue Code: Warbus V. Commissioner, Erik M. Jensen

Faculty Publications

This article examines a 1998 Tax Court decision, Warbus v. Commissioner, that has implications for both American Indian law and federal tax law. Section 7873 of the Internal Revenue Code exempts from taxation amounts derived by American Indian tribal members from fishing-rights related activit[ies] of their tribes. Taxpayer Warbus claimed that discharge of indebtedness income from the foreclosure of his fishing boat qualified for the exclusion; the Tax Court said no. The author argues that Warbus was wrongly decided for two reasons: the court failed to take account of basic principles of American Indian law, and the court misapplied ...


American Indian Tribes And 401(K) Plans, Erik M. Jensen Jan 1995

American Indian Tribes And 401(K) Plans, Erik M. Jensen

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.