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Full-Text Articles in Law

Free Exercise In The Free State: Maryland's Role In Religious Liberty And The First Amendment, Kenneth Lasson Oct 1989

Free Exercise In The Free State: Maryland's Role In Religious Liberty And The First Amendment, Kenneth Lasson

All Faculty Scholarship

Maryland arguably holds the distinction of being the state whose early history most directly ensured, and whose citizenry was most directly affected by, the First Amendment's protection of religious freedom. Because of its relatively diverse religious population, Maryland stood out as both a champion of tolerance and a hotbed of discrimination for most of its colonial experience. Similarities have been pointed out between the first provincial government in St. Mary's, Maryland, and the American plan under the Constitution, particularly with respect to religious liberty.

This article offers a brief overview of the religious history of Maryland, focuses on ...


"Discrimination" On The Basis Of Religion: An Examination Of Attempted Value Neutrality In Employment, Laura S. Underkuffler Apr 1989

"Discrimination" On The Basis Of Religion: An Examination Of Attempted Value Neutrality In Employment, Laura S. Underkuffler

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Toward A Constitutional Jurisprudence Of Religious Group Rights, Frederick Mark Gedicks Jan 1989

Toward A Constitutional Jurisprudence Of Religious Group Rights, Frederick Mark Gedicks

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


The Problem Of Dirty Hands, Leslie C. Griffin Jan 1989

The Problem Of Dirty Hands, Leslie C. Griffin

Scholarly Works

This essay examines what Sartre called the problem of "dirty hands" as it applies to two issues in contemporary Catholic discussions of political morality. Beginning with Michael Walzer's work on dirty hands, the essay next identifies four approaches to this problem characteristic of Christian ethics. These four categories are then applied to analysis of two issues: conflicts of conscience that may confront Catholic politicians as a result of the responsibilities of public office and the church's exclusion of clergy and religious from holding public


Forum Juridicum: Church Autonomy In The Constitutional Order - The End Of Church And State?, Gerard V. Bradley Jan 1989

Forum Juridicum: Church Autonomy In The Constitutional Order - The End Of Church And State?, Gerard V. Bradley

Journal Articles

No abstract provided.


God Bless The Child?: The Use Of Religion As A Factor In Child Custody And Adoption Proceedings, 58 Fordham L. Rev. 383 (1989), Donald L. Beschle Jan 1989

God Bless The Child?: The Use Of Religion As A Factor In Child Custody And Adoption Proceedings, 58 Fordham L. Rev. 383 (1989), Donald L. Beschle

UIC Law Open Access Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Freedom Of Speech, Press And Assembly, And Freedom Of Religion Under The Illinois Constitution, 21 Loy. U. Chi. L.J. 91 (1989), Michael P. Seng Jan 1989

Freedom Of Speech, Press And Assembly, And Freedom Of Religion Under The Illinois Constitution, 21 Loy. U. Chi. L.J. 91 (1989), Michael P. Seng

UIC Law Open Access Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Comment On Church And State In Seventeenth And Eighteenth Century America, John H. Garvey Jan 1989

Comment On Church And State In Seventeenth And Eighteenth Century America, John H. Garvey

Scholarly Articles and Other Contributions

No abstract provided.


Developments In The Law Of Church-State Relations: The 1987 Term Of The United States Supreme Court, Robert A. Destro Jan 1989

Developments In The Law Of Church-State Relations: The 1987 Term Of The United States Supreme Court, Robert A. Destro

Scholarly Articles and Other Contributions

No abstract provided.


Legal Affinities, Joseph Vining Jan 1989

Legal Affinities, Joseph Vining

Articles

Not long ago, any question of the kind "How may theology serve as a resource in understanding law?" would have been hardly conceivable among lawyers. When Lon Fuller brought out his first book in 1940, The Law in Quest of Itself, he could think of no better way of tagging his adversary the legal positivist than to note a "parallel between theoretical theology and analytical jurisprudence." Two decades later, in the name of realism, Thurman Arnold dismissed Henry Hart's non-positivist jurisprudence in harsh terms. A master of the cutting phrase, he confidently entitled his attack "Professor Hart's Theology ...