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National Security Law

2009

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Articles 1 - 30 of 37

Full-Text Articles in Law

Cyber Warfare And Precautions Against The Effects Of Attacks, Eric Talbot Jensen Dec 2009

Cyber Warfare And Precautions Against The Effects Of Attacks, Eric Talbot Jensen

Faculty Scholarship

Ninety-eight percent of all U.S. government communications travel over civilian-owned-and-operated networks. Additionally, the government relies almost completely on civilian providers for computer software and hardware products, services, and maintenance. This near-complete intermixing of civilian and military computer infrastructure makes many of those civilian objects and providers legitimate targets under the law of armed conflict. Other civilian networks, services, and communications may suffer collateral damage from legitimate attacks on government targets. To protect those civilian objects and providers from the effects of attacks, the law of armed conflict requires a state to segregate its military assets from the civilian population and …


Digital Forensics: Everything Leaves A Trace In Cyberspace, Gary C. Kessler Oct 2009

Digital Forensics: Everything Leaves A Trace In Cyberspace, Gary C. Kessler

Applied Aviation Sciences - Daytona Beach

"What is cyberforensics • Legal issues • The computer/network forensics process • Where does the data go ‐- Some examples • Locard's Principle"--Overview


Digital Forensics: Everything Leaves A Trace In Cyberspace, Gary C. Kessler Oct 2009

Digital Forensics: Everything Leaves A Trace In Cyberspace, Gary C. Kessler

Security Studies & International Affairs - Daytona Beach

"What is cyberforensics • Legal issues • The computer/network forensics process • Where does the data go ‐- Some examples • Locard's Principle"--Overview


National Security Policy And Ratification Of The Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty, Winston P. Nagan, Erin K. Slemmens Oct 2009

National Security Policy And Ratification Of The Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty, Winston P. Nagan, Erin K. Slemmens

UF Law Faculty Publications

While no legal obstacles prevent the U.S. Senate's reconsideration of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT), lingering doubts (about the effectiveness of the international treaty) and partisan politics (founded upon outdated ideologies of national sovereignty) may again foreclose the opportunity for the United States to lead a just and thorough regime of international arms control. By closely examining the U.S. Senate's previous rejection (and, by implication, the nation's non-ratification) of the CTBT, we assess the political process that failed to realize the security values now imperative to U.S. national defense. To this appraisal, we join analysis of the contemporary law, policy, …


Jews In Jail, Kenneth Lasson Sep 2009

Jews In Jail, Kenneth Lasson

All Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Legal Obligations: The Proper Role Of White House Lawyers, William Michael Treanor Aug 2009

Legal Obligations: The Proper Role Of White House Lawyers, William Michael Treanor

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

An opinion issued on Aug. 1, 2002, by Assistant Attorney General Jay S. Bybee of the Department of Justice’s Office of Legal Counsel held that the federal statute that makes it a crime to commit torture outside the United States should not be read to “apply to the President’s detention and interrogation of enemy combatants pursuant to his Commander-in-Chief authority.” The opinion further concluded that if the statute did criminalize interrogations ordered by the president, it was unconstitutional.

The memorandum, which has become known as the “torture memo,” figures prominently in the ongoing public debate about whether there should be …


A Law Library Development Project In Iraq: Looking Back Two Years Later, Kimberli Kelmor Jul 2009

A Law Library Development Project In Iraq: Looking Back Two Years Later, Kimberli Kelmor

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

Sometimes you get a chance to work on a project so complex, even you don't come to fully understand its impact until years later. At least that has been the experience for me regarding the opportunity I had to work in Iraq with the International Human Rights Law Institute (IHRLI) from February 2004 to January 1, 2006. As I reported in a previous essay, IHRLI, an institute of the DePaul University College of Law headed by Cherif Bassiouni, received a United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Higher Education and Development (HEAD) contract to work with three Iraqi law schools.' …


The Perilous Dialogue, Laura K. Donohue Apr 2009

The Perilous Dialogue, Laura K. Donohue

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

The master metaphor in the national security dialogue is, indeed, “security or freedom”. It dominates the counterterrorist discourse both in the United States and abroad. Transcripts from debates in Ireland’s Dáil Éireann, Turkey’s Büyük Millet Meclisi, and Australia’s Parliament are filled with reference to the need to weigh the value of liberty against the threat posed by terrorism. Perhaps nowhere is this more pronounced than in the United Kingdom, where, for decades, counterterrorist debates have turned on this framing. Owing in part, though, to different constitutional structures, what “security or freedom” means in America differs from what it means in …


Development Of The Organised Crime Threat Assessment (Octa) And Internal Security Architecture, Benjamin J. Goold Mar 2009

Development Of The Organised Crime Threat Assessment (Octa) And Internal Security Architecture, Benjamin J. Goold

All Faculty Publications

This briefing paper provides an overview of the existing European Union approach to issues of security, counter-terrorism, and organised crime. In particular, it focuses on the role of the European Security Strategy (ESS) in the formation of policy and in the development of new institutions and institutional arrangements within the EU, and the influence of the Organised Crime Threat Assessment (OCTA). The paper argues that steps should be taken to streamline and rationalise the existing structures concerned with security, counter-terrorism and organised crime, and strongly recommends that a “Committee on Internal Security” be established to act as a single point …


Pollard Languishes, Kenneth Lasson Feb 2009

Pollard Languishes, Kenneth Lasson

All Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Terrorist Detention: Directions For Reform, Benjamin Priester Jan 2009

Terrorist Detention: Directions For Reform, Benjamin Priester

Journal Publications

Counterterrorism efforts by the U.S. government since 2001 have produced numerous legal controversies. One of the most controversial subjects has been the detention of individuals allegedly involved with terrorist organizations or activities. Unlike traditional criminal detainees, such persons are not held pursuant to indictment on charges pending trial or to a verdict of conviction. Unlike traditional military detainees, they are not battlefield captives from combat in a war zone against the military forces of another nation. Rather, terrorist detainees are held based on the individual's alleged connections to terrorist organizations and activities, without more. Terrorist detention, so defined, is an …


American Hegemony And The Foreign Affairs Constitution, Robert Knowles Jan 2009

American Hegemony And The Foreign Affairs Constitution, Robert Knowles

Law Faculty Publications

This Article uses insights from international relations theory to challenge the received wisdom that U.S. courts are incompetent to decide .foreign affairs issues. Since September 11, 2001, in particular, proponents of broad executive power have argued that the Judiciary lacks the Executive's expertise, speed, flexibility, uniformity, and political savvy necessary in foreign affairs. For these reasons, legal doctrine has long called for especially strong foreign affairs deference to the Executive. This Article argues that special deference is grounded in an outmoded version of the popular theory of international relations known as realism. Realism views the world as anarchic, nations as …


United States V. Benkahla: Illustrating The Need For Reform - The Fourth Circuit's Unprecedented Application Of The United States Sentencing Guideline Terrorism Enhancement To An Obstruction Of Justice Conviction, Steven A. Book Jan 2009

United States V. Benkahla: Illustrating The Need For Reform - The Fourth Circuit's Unprecedented Application Of The United States Sentencing Guideline Terrorism Enhancement To An Obstruction Of Justice Conviction, Steven A. Book

Maryland Law Review Online

No abstract provided.


House Of Wisdom Or A House Of Cards? Why Teaching Islam In U.S. Foreign Detention Facilities Violates The Establishment Clause, Scott Thompson Jan 2009

House Of Wisdom Or A House Of Cards? Why Teaching Islam In U.S. Foreign Detention Facilities Violates The Establishment Clause, Scott Thompson

Publications

In an attempt to erase Islamic-fundamentalist sentiments held by detainees apprehended in the course of the "war on terror," the United States government began teaching and preaching a more moderate version of the Qur'an and Islam to detainees in Iraq. One such detention program in Iraq was dubbed the House of Wisdom. But the wisdom of such a practice is highly suspect--both because it likely runs afoul of the Establishment Clause of the First Amendment and because it may be doing more harm than good to the American effort to defuse Islamic-extremism and anti-American sentiment. This Article examines the practice …


Title Vi Disparate Impact Claims Would Not Harm National Security - A Response To Paul Taylor, 46 Harv. J. On Legis. 503 (2009), Michael T. Kirkpatrick, Margaret B. Kwoka Jan 2009

Title Vi Disparate Impact Claims Would Not Harm National Security - A Response To Paul Taylor, 46 Harv. J. On Legis. 503 (2009), Michael T. Kirkpatrick, Margaret B. Kwoka

UIC Law Open Access Faculty Scholarship

As Paul Taylor recognizes in the previous issue of this volume of the Harvard Journal on Legislation, Congress is considering amendments to Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 to explicitly allow private plaintiffs to use the disparate impact theory to prove discrimination by recipients of federal financial assistance. This Article responds to Taylor's assertion that allowing such disparate impact claims could harm national security programs. The authors explore the history of the disparate impact theory under both Title VI and Title VII, explain that use of the theory is consistent with Congress's original intent, and argue that …


An Overt Turn On Covert Action, Afsheen John Radsan Jan 2009

An Overt Turn On Covert Action, Afsheen John Radsan

Faculty Scholarship

Long past the soul-searching of Watergate, very few people question the need for covert action as a part of American foreign policy. The world is so dangerous after 9/11 that it would be irresponsible to suggest that our intelligence agencies should be disbanded or that our government should acknowledge everything it does on the dark side. Today the question is not whether we should engage in covert action at all, but how often and under what circumstances.

Not everything stays secret. Our Nation has been conducting covert action with greater transparency and more congressional participation than during the Cold War. …


Change Versus Continuity At Obama’S Cia, Afsheen John Radsan Jan 2009

Change Versus Continuity At Obama’S Cia, Afsheen John Radsan

Faculty Scholarship

Sweeping change is necessary at the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA). During President Barack Obama‘s transition into office, change should go deeper than usual between administrations. To restore the trust of the American people and to regain the confidence of the international community, the CIA needs to do better. I will outline three areas for legislative change relating to my former employer, the CIA. The first proposal is to have a national security court for the trials of terrorists. The second is to permit the CIA to continue to have an exception to pursue aggressive interrogations with a lot of oversight …


Due Process And Targeted Killing Of Terrorists, Richard Murphy, Afsheen John Radsan Jan 2009

Due Process And Targeted Killing Of Terrorists, Richard Murphy, Afsheen John Radsan

Faculty Scholarship

"Targeted killing" is extra-judicial, premeditated killing by a state of a specifically identified person not in its custody. States have used this tool, secretly or not, throughout history. In recent years, targeted killing has generated new controversy as two states in particular-Israel and the United States-have struggled against opponents embedded in civilian populations. As a matter of express policy, Israel engages in targeted killing of persons it deems members of terrorist organizations involved in attacks on Israel. The United States, less expressly, has adopted a similar policy against al Qaeda-particularly in the border areas of Afghanistan and Pakistan, where the …


Towards A Cyberspace Legal Regime In The Twenty-First Century: Considerations For American Cyber-Warriors, Charles J. Dunlap Jr. Jan 2009

Towards A Cyberspace Legal Regime In The Twenty-First Century: Considerations For American Cyber-Warriors, Charles J. Dunlap Jr.

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


In The Sweat Box: A Historical Perspective On The Detention Of Material Witnesses, Carolyn B. Ramsey Jan 2009

In The Sweat Box: A Historical Perspective On The Detention Of Material Witnesses, Carolyn B. Ramsey

Publications

After the September 11 terrorist attacks, the Justice Department detained scores of allegedly suspicious persons under a federal material witness statute--a tactic that provoked a great deal of controversy. Most critics assume that the abuse of material witness laws is a new development. Yet, rather than being transformed by the War on Terror, the detention of material witnesses is a coercive strategy that police officers across the nation have used since the nineteenth century to build cases against suspects. Fears of extraordinary violence or social breakdown played at most an indirect role in its advent and growth. Rather, it has …


Roles, Missions,And Equipment: Military Lessons From Experience In This Decade, Charles J. Dunlap Jr. Jan 2009

Roles, Missions,And Equipment: Military Lessons From Experience In This Decade, Charles J. Dunlap Jr.

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


United Nations Collective Security And The United States Security Guarantee In An Age Of Rising Multipolarity: The Security Council As The Talking Shop Of The Nations, Kenneth Anderson Jan 2009

United Nations Collective Security And The United States Security Guarantee In An Age Of Rising Multipolarity: The Security Council As The Talking Shop Of The Nations, Kenneth Anderson

Articles in Law Reviews & Other Academic Journals

This essay considers the respective roles of the United Nations and the United States in a world of rising multipolarity and rising new (or old) Great Powers. It asks why UN collective security as a concept persists, despite the well-known failures, both practical and theoretical, and why it remains anchored to the UN Security Council. The persistence is owed, according to the essay, to the fact of a parallel US security guarantee that offers much of the world (in descending degrees starting with NATO and close US allies such as Japan, but even extending to non-allies and even enemies who …


The Internet's Public Domain: Access To Government Information On The Internet, Susan Nevelow Mart Jan 2009

The Internet's Public Domain: Access To Government Information On The Internet, Susan Nevelow Mart

Publications

This article surveys the types and amounts of information that have been removed from the Internet since September 11th. Information has been removed in the name of national security as well as for reasons of seeming political expediency. After discussing the bases of some of the rationales for removing the information, and the legal underpinnings of continued access, the article suggests several forms of advocacy that could be used to return the information to the public's domain.


Le Développement De L’Évaluation De La Menace De La Criminalité Organisée Et L’Architecure De Sécurité Intérieure (Development Of The Organised Crime Threat Assessment (Octa) And Internal Security Architecture), Benjamin J. Goold Jan 2009

Le Développement De L’Évaluation De La Menace De La Criminalité Organisée Et L’Architecure De Sécurité Intérieure (Development Of The Organised Crime Threat Assessment (Octa) And Internal Security Architecture), Benjamin J. Goold

All Faculty Publications

Cette note propose une vue d’ensemble de l’approche européenne des questions de sécurité, de lutte contre le terrorisme et contre la criminalité organisée. Elle aborde plus particulièrement le rôle de la Stratégie européenne de sécurité (SES) dans l’élaboration des politiques et des dispositions institutionnelles, ainsi que l’influence de l’OCTA (Évaluation de la menace de la criminalité organisée). cette note recommande qu’un certain nombre de mesures soient prises pour recentrer et rationaliser les structures existantes attachées aux questions de sécurité et de lutte contre le terrorisme et le crime organisé. Le nombre d’agences directement ou indirectement impliquées dans le recueil d’informations, …


Surveillance And The Political Value Of Privacy, Benjamin J. Goold Jan 2009

Surveillance And The Political Value Of Privacy, Benjamin J. Goold

All Faculty Publications

The steady expansion in the use of surveillance technologies by the state and private sector represents a substantial threat to the privacy of ordinary individuals. Yet despite the best efforts of civil libertarians, many members of the public still struggle to understand why privacy is valuable and deserves to be protected as a basic right. In part, this is a result of the inherent complexity of the idea of privacy, but it is also due a tendency on the part of privacy advocates to focus on the individual - as opposed to the social and political dimensions - of privacy. …


Putting Surveillance On The Political Agenda – A Short Defence Of Surveillance: Citizens And The State, Benjamin J. Goold, Charles D. Raab Jan 2009

Putting Surveillance On The Political Agenda – A Short Defence Of Surveillance: Citizens And The State, Benjamin J. Goold, Charles D. Raab

All Faculty Publications

In February 2009 the House of Lords Constitutional Committee in the United Kingdom published the report Surveillance: Citizens and the State. Some have hailed this as a landmark document. Volume 6(3) of Surveillance & Society published 4 invited responses to this report written by prominent scholars. In the attached paper the two Specialist Advisers to this Committee set the context for the report and provide a brief rejoinder to the four responses. NOTE: The authors write in their academic and personal capacities, and not as representatives of the Committee.


International Human Rights Law And Security Detention, Douglass Cassel Jan 2009

International Human Rights Law And Security Detention, Douglass Cassel

Journal Articles

This article analyzes the grounds, procedures, and conditions required by International Human Rights Law for preventive detention of suspected terrorists as threats to security. Such detention is generally permitted, provided it is based on grounds and procedures previously established by law; is not arbitrary, discriminatory, or disproportionate; is publicly registered and subject to fair and effective judicial review; and the detainee is not mistreated and is compensated for any unlawful detention. In Europe, however, preventive detention for security purposes is generally not permitted. If allowed at all, it is permitted only when a State in time of national emergency formally …


Exceptional Engagement: Protocol I And A World United Against Terrorism, Michael A. Newton Jan 2009

Exceptional Engagement: Protocol I And A World United Against Terrorism, Michael A. Newton

Vanderbilt Law School Faculty Publications

This article challenges the prevailing view that U.S. "exceptionalism" provides the strongest narrative for the U.S. rejection of Additional Protocol I to the 1949 Geneva Conventions. The United States chose not to adopt the Protocol in the face of intensive international criticism because of its policy conclusions that the text contained overly expansive provisions resulting from politicized pressure to accord protection to terrorists who elected to conduct hostile military operations outside the established legal framework. The United States concluded that the commingling of the regime criminalizing terrorist acts with the jus in bello rules of humanitarian law would be untenable …


Human Dignity, Humiliation, And Torture, David Luban Jan 2009

Human Dignity, Humiliation, And Torture, David Luban

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

Modern human rights instruments ground human rights in the concept of human dignity, without providing an underlying theory of human dignity. This paper examines the central importance of human dignity, understood as not humiliating people, in traditional Jewish ethics. It employs this conception of human dignity to examine and criticize U.S. use of humiliation tactics and torture in the interrogation of terrorism suspects.


International Standards For Detaining Terrorism Suspects: Moving Beyond The Armed Conflict-Criminal Divide, Monica Hakimi Jan 2009

International Standards For Detaining Terrorism Suspects: Moving Beyond The Armed Conflict-Criminal Divide, Monica Hakimi

Articles

Although sometimes described as war, the fight against transnational jihadi groups (referred to for shorthand as the "fight against terrorism") largely takes place away from any recognizable battlefield. Terrorism suspects are captured in houses, on street corners, and at border crossings around the globe. Khalid Shaikh Mohammed, the high-level Qaeda operative who planned the September 11 attacks, was captured by the Pakistani government in a residence in Pakistan. Abu Omar, a radical Muslim imam, was apparently abducted by U.S. and Italian agents off the streets of Milan. And Abu Baker Bashir, the spiritual leader of the Qaeda-affiliated group responsible for …