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Articles 1 - 14 of 14

Full-Text Articles in Law

Factitious Disorders And Trauma-Related Diagnoses, Daniel Brown, Alan Scheflin Oct 1999

Factitious Disorders And Trauma-Related Diagnoses, Daniel Brown, Alan Scheflin

Faculty Publications

The recent plethora of lawsuits involving allegations of iatrogenically implanted memories of satanic ritual abuse and other traumas has highlighted the existence of a unique group of psychiatric patients. Although these patients are often successful at deceiving therapists (and sometimes juries), the case studies in this special issue reveal the chronic nature of their propensity to invent traumatic identities and past histories. The core clinical features of affect dysregulation, somatization, and impaired object relations, together with frequent histories of alcohol and substance abuse, parallel the psychiatric co-morbidity frequently found in genuine trauma victims. These case studies also point to early ...


The Erotics Of Virtue, Kenneth Anderson Jun 1999

The Erotics Of Virtue, Kenneth Anderson

Book Reviews

(Obituary Essay on Dominique Aury/Pauline Reage, Author of Story of O)This essay originally appeared in the LA Times book review as an obituary essay on Dominique Aury, author (under the name Pauline Reage) of the pornographic classic Story of O. The essay argues that Story of O is a fairy tale in which the heroine, O, seeks to escape from modernity's enforced virtues of equality, freedom, and choice into a world of the virtues of hierarchy - the eroticized analogues of religious submission. The novel is driven forward by a downward spiral in which O seeks to surrender ...


Undergraduate Education In Legal Psychology, Solomon F. Fulero, Edith Greene, Valerie P. Hans, Michael T. Nietzel, Mark A. Small, Lawrence S. Wrightsman Feb 1999

Undergraduate Education In Legal Psychology, Solomon F. Fulero, Edith Greene, Valerie P. Hans, Michael T. Nietzel, Mark A. Small, Lawrence S. Wrightsman

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

The purpose of this article is to describe ways that legal psychology can be introduced into the undergraduate curriculum. The extent to which undergraduate "psychology and law" courses are currently part of the curriculum is described, and a model is proposed for coursework in a Psychology Department that might adequately reflect coverage of the legal area. The role of legal psychology in interdisciplinary programs and Criminal Justice departments is discussed. Sources for teaching aids and curricular materials are described.


Herd Behavior In Designer Genes, Peter H. Huang Jan 1999

Herd Behavior In Designer Genes, Peter H. Huang

Articles

The ability of individuals to choose their children's genes has increased over time and may ultimately culminate in a world involving free market reprogenetic technologies. Reprogenetic technologies combine advances in reproductive biology and genetics to provide humans increased control over their children's genes. This Article offers economic perspectives that are helpful in understanding the possibly unexpected ethical, legal, and social issues at stake in using reprogenetic technologies for trait enhancement selection. The Appendix analyzes two competitive games that might arise in such a biotechnological society. Specifically, the Article focuses on herd behavior, caused by either a popularity contest ...


The Confusion Of Causes And Reasons In Forensic Psychology: Deconstructing Mens Rea And Other Mental Events, 33 U. Rich. L. Rev. 107 (1999), Joel R. Cornwell Jan 1999

The Confusion Of Causes And Reasons In Forensic Psychology: Deconstructing Mens Rea And Other Mental Events, 33 U. Rich. L. Rev. 107 (1999), Joel R. Cornwell

UIC Law Open Access Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


The Juvenile Justice Counterrevolution: Responding To Cognitive Dissonance In The Law's View Of The Decision-Making Capacity Of Minors, 48 Emory L. J. 65 (1999), Donald L. Beschle Jan 1999

The Juvenile Justice Counterrevolution: Responding To Cognitive Dissonance In The Law's View Of The Decision-Making Capacity Of Minors, 48 Emory L. J. 65 (1999), Donald L. Beschle

UIC Law Open Access Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


The False Litigant Syndrome: "Nobody Would Say That Unless It Was The Truth", Alan Scheflin, Daniel Brown Jan 1999

The False Litigant Syndrome: "Nobody Would Say That Unless It Was The Truth", Alan Scheflin, Daniel Brown

Faculty Publications

In this article we intend to focus on the narrow but increasingly more signif icant issue of retractors in malpractice actions against therapists. It is generally believed that people do not make confessions unless they are actually guilty. It is also generally believed that retractors who recant their earlier statements must now be telling the truth. Courts have allowed expert testimony to be admitted on the issue of why people will falsely confess. In this paper we argue that expert testimony on why people falsely recant should also be admissible.


Neither Desert Nor Disease, Stephen J. Morse Jan 1999

Neither Desert Nor Disease, Stephen J. Morse

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.


Embracing Descent: The Bankruptcy Of A Business Paradigm For Conceptualizing And Regulating The Legal Profession, Jeffrey W. Stempel Jan 1999

Embracing Descent: The Bankruptcy Of A Business Paradigm For Conceptualizing And Regulating The Legal Profession, Jeffrey W. Stempel

Scholarly Works

Lawyers are said to travel in packs, or at least pairs, and in the popular parlance are often compared to hoards of locusts, herds of cattle, or unruly mobs. However, at least for purposes of assessing concerns with professionalism currently surrounding the bar and the public, whether attorneys are more or less social than other human animals does not matter. My point is simply that lawyers are social beings; like other human beings in social and occupational groups, lawyers behave largely in accordance with group norms, in much the same way peer pressure led Julian English toward juvenile delinquency in ...


Entrepreneurs And The Estate Tax, James R. Repetti Jan 1999

Entrepreneurs And The Estate Tax, James R. Repetti

Boston College Law School Faculty Papers

This article analyzes the claims of a recent commentary by Douglas Holtz-Eakin, The Death Tax: Investments, Employment and Entrepreneurs, in 84 Tax Notes 782 (Aug. 2, 1999) that the estate tax discourages entrepreneurs from investing their resources in their entrepreneurial activities. The article concludes that the effects of the estate tax on entrepreneurs investing their resources are minimal for two reasons. First, the effective federal estate tax rates applicable to the yield from an investment when the entrepreneur is under age 60 are quite small (0.3% for investors under age 60, 0.1% for investors under age 50). The ...


"Half-Wracked Prejudice Leaped Forth:" Sanism, Pretextuality, And Why And How Mental Disability Law Developed As It Did, Michael L. Perlin Jan 1999

"Half-Wracked Prejudice Leaped Forth:" Sanism, Pretextuality, And Why And How Mental Disability Law Developed As It Did, Michael L. Perlin

Articles & Chapters

Mental disability law jurisprudence is often incoherent Much of its incoherence can be explained by two concepts that dominate this area of the law: sanism (the irrational prejudices that cause, and are reflected in, prevailing social attitudes toward mentally disabled persons, and those so perceived) and pretextuality (the courts' acceptance -- either implicit or explicit -- of testimonial dishonesty and their decisions to engage in dishonest decisionmaking in mental disability law cases). Mental disability law is frequently premised on stereotypes and on prejudice, on typification and fear. These distortions reflect sanism; cases that sanction the use of such stereotypes and prejudice reflect ...


Sticks And Stones, Phoebe C. Ellsworth Jan 1999

Sticks And Stones, Phoebe C. Ellsworth

Articles

I believe that research should be refuted by research. More and more of our scarce journal space is being taken up by attacks, rebuttals, and rebuttals to the rebuttals, often ending with a whimper of recognition that the adversaries were not so very far apart to begin with, and that the only way (if possible) to resolve the disagreement is through empirical research. Communication of scientific disagreement does not require a published article. Grant proposals and manuscripts submitted to refereed journals like this one are sent out to reviewers, who provide written evaluations that are communicated to the author. Papers ...


Near Misses, William I. Miller Jan 1999

Near Misses, William I. Miller

Articles

I was recently invited to give a keynote address for a small academic conference whose advertised theme was "Near Misses, Contingencies, and Histories." I have a rough and ready understanding of the near miss, the same kind of understanding we have of most words and phrases that spill out effortlessly in normal conversation. I use it and have heard it used by myriad others to describe a certain style of disappointment and regret. It is a concept generally available to us all, but when coupled with contingencies and histories, as in the title of the conference with its vague suggestions ...


Crazy Reasons, Stephen J. Morse Jan 1999

Crazy Reasons, Stephen J. Morse

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.