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Articles 1 - 10 of 10

Full-Text Articles in Law

Remedies And The Psychology Of Ownership, Jeffrey J. Rachlinski, Forest Jourden Nov 1998

Remedies And The Psychology Of Ownership, Jeffrey J. Rachlinski, Forest Jourden

Cornell Law Faculty Publications



Dangers Of Monetary Commensurability: A Psychological Game Model Of Contagion, Peter H. Huang Jan 1998

Dangers Of Monetary Commensurability: A Psychological Game Model Of Contagion, Peter H. Huang

Articles

No abstract provided.


Capital Jury And Absolution: The Intersection Of Trial Strategy Remorse And The Death Penalty, Scott E. Sundby Jan 1998

Capital Jury And Absolution: The Intersection Of Trial Strategy Remorse And The Death Penalty, Scott E. Sundby

Articles

No abstract provided.


Hendricks And The Future Of Sex Offender Commitment Laws, Eric S. Janus Jan 1998

Hendricks And The Future Of Sex Offender Commitment Laws, Eric S. Janus

Faculty Scholarship

The Supreme Court's decision in Kansas v. Hendricks suggests that few constitutional limitations will be imposed. This article discusses the four elements imposed by the Court in Hendricks, and then discusses the likely implications of the decision, using civil commitment laws currently on the books and actual post-Hendricks decisions. The article concludes that the imbalance between commitments and discharges will cause commitment populations to grow over the foreseeable future. Eventually the huge costs of commitment schemes will force serious assessment of whether the facial logic of these programs hides seriously distorted resource allocation and anti-therapeutic side-effects.


The Clinton Chronicle: Diary Of A Political Psychologist, Aubrey Immelman Jan 1998

The Clinton Chronicle: Diary Of A Political Psychologist, Aubrey Immelman

Psychology Faculty Publications

Chronicle, from the perspective of political psychology, of events and controversies in the impeachment saga of President Bill Clinton, from the president’s August 17, 1998 testimony before the grand jury in the Starr investigation to his acquittal on February 12, 1999.


Where The Winds Hit Heavy On The Borderline: Mental Disability Law, Theory And Practice, Us And Them, Michael L. Perlin Jan 1998

Where The Winds Hit Heavy On The Borderline: Mental Disability Law, Theory And Practice, Us And Them, Michael L. Perlin

Articles & Chapters

No abstract provided.


There's No Success Like Failure/And Failure's No Success At All: Exposing The Pretextuality Of Kansas V. Hendricks, Michael L. Perlin Jan 1998

There's No Success Like Failure/And Failure's No Success At All: Exposing The Pretextuality Of Kansas V. Hendricks, Michael L. Perlin

Articles & Chapters

No abstract provided.


Ann Arbor, December 1997, William I. Miller Jan 1998

Ann Arbor, December 1997, William I. Miller

Articles

In a journal entry from Dec 1997, Miller describes his daily thoughts and activities. He recalls watching "Beauty and the Beast," contemplating his views on sex and being sick during the Christmas season.


Life Before The Modern Sex Offender Statutes , Deborah W. Denno Jan 1998

Life Before The Modern Sex Offender Statutes , Deborah W. Denno

Faculty Scholarship

This Article examines the social and legal developments that fueled the origins and recurring problems of sex offender laws. Part I of this Article discusses the primary precursors of the sexual psychopath statutes that encouraged the public's and politicians' acceptance of the concept of sexual psychopathy: the increasing sexualization of American society, changes in gender roles and relations, the valuation of children and the family unit, and the influx of psychiatry. Part II describes how the diagnosis of sexual psychopathy slowly developed as a result of the criminal justice system's growing tendency to explain criminal behavior in psychoanalytic ...


Objectivist Vs. Subjectivist Views Of Criminality: A Study In The Role Of Social Science In Criminal Law Theory, Paul H. Robinson, John M. Darley Jan 1998

Objectivist Vs. Subjectivist Views Of Criminality: A Study In The Role Of Social Science In Criminal Law Theory, Paul H. Robinson, John M. Darley

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

The authors use social science methodology to determine whether a doctrinal shift-from an objectivist view of criminality in the common law to a subjectivist view in modern criminal codes-is consistent with lay intuitions of the principles of justice. Commentators have suggested that lay perceptions of criminality have shifted in a way reflected in the doctrinal change, but the study results suggest a more nuanced conclusion: that the modern lay view agrees with the subjectivist view of modern codes in defining the minimum requirements of criminality, but prefers the common law's objectivist view of grading the punishment deserved. The authors ...