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Series

Education Law

2001

Articles 1 - 18 of 18

Full-Text Articles in Law

Censorship Tsunami Spares College Media: To Protect Free Expression On Public Campuses, Lessons From The "College Hazelwood" Case, Richard J. Peltz-Steele Jan 2001

Censorship Tsunami Spares College Media: To Protect Free Expression On Public Campuses, Lessons From The "College Hazelwood" Case, Richard J. Peltz-Steele

Faculty Publications

Since the advent of journalism schools in the college academy, student publications have taken their place as a vital component of campus life. As counterparts to the Fourth Estate in the society at large, college journalists act as watchdogs on student government, ensuring that student money is wisely spent and student justice equitably administered. As an outpost of the Fourth Estate, college journalism serves all the public by monitoring the administration of higher education. In September 1999, a decision from the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit threatened to radically distort the face of college journalism by ...


Common Schools And The Common Good: Reflections On The School-Choice Debate, Richard W. Garnett Jan 2001

Common Schools And The Common Good: Reflections On The School-Choice Debate, Richard W. Garnett

Journal Articles

No abstract provided.


Students And Due Process In Higher Education: Of Interests And Procedures, Fernand N. Dutile Jan 2001

Students And Due Process In Higher Education: Of Interests And Procedures, Fernand N. Dutile

Journal Articles

No abstract provided.


The Use Of Video-Conferencing Technology In Legal Education: A Practical Guide, Catherine Arcabascio Jan 2001

The Use Of Video-Conferencing Technology In Legal Education: A Practical Guide, Catherine Arcabascio

Faculty Scholarship

This article explores the use of advanced computer technologies to offer distance learning programs in United States law schools. It begins with an explanation of the original distance learning methods and differentiates them from current methods that incorporate computer-based technologies. The article also explains the different types of technologies available for use in distance learning and describes the model currently in use at the Shepard Broad Law Center at Nova Southeastern University ("Law Center"). Finally, it discusses the pedagogical and planning issues that arise when using this technology, the hardware that is required, and the costs associated with this type ...


Religion At A Public University, Gerard V. Bradley Jan 2001

Religion At A Public University, Gerard V. Bradley

Journal Articles

No abstract provided.


Testing Multiple Intelligences: Comparing Evaluation By Simulation And Written Exam , Ian Weinstein Jan 2001

Testing Multiple Intelligences: Comparing Evaluation By Simulation And Written Exam , Ian Weinstein

Faculty Scholarship

Written examinations play a key role in legal education. The LSAT is the most important factor in law school admissions. Once students enroll in law school, exams are used to evaluate and sort first year students. At most American law schools, a single, end of semester or end of year, timed, written, in class exam determines the grade in each first year class.' Although exams continue to play a major role throughout law school, once students are sorted at the end of first year it is often difficult for them to significantly change their place in the law school hierarchy ...


The Supreme Court 2000 Term--Leading Cases, Good News Club V. Milford Central School, 121 S. Ct. 2093 (2001), Emily Gold Waldman Jan 2001

The Supreme Court 2000 Term--Leading Cases, Good News Club V. Milford Central School, 121 S. Ct. 2093 (2001), Emily Gold Waldman

Elisabeth Haub School of Law Faculty Publications

After the Supreme Court held in Widmar v. Vincent that state universities could not constitutionally deny religious groups access to facilities generally available to student groups, a number of school districts authored access policies that were designed to create “limited public forums.” These policies delineated the categories of activities for which school property could be used, and indicated that religious activities were not among them. In Lamb's Chapel v. Center Moriches Union Free School District, however, the Supreme Court struck a blow to the notion that school districts could employ the limited public forum approach to exclude religious activities ...


The Academic Support Student In The Year 2010, Leslie Yalof Garfield Jan 2001

The Academic Support Student In The Year 2010, Leslie Yalof Garfield

Elisabeth Haub School of Law Faculty Publications

Academic support professionals have long recognized the benefits of imparting a greater knowledge of learning skills to law students as a way to enhance their ability to learn the law. Consequently, the science and pedagogy of academic support have become a staple of legal education. However, while the need for academic support remains a constant, the identification of those in need of academic support programs continues to be in flux. Growing social awareness of an expanded definition of diversity, recent decisions such as Hopwood v. Texas and the proliferation of academic support programs have expanded the definition of the academic ...


"A" For Effort: Evaluating Recent State Education Reform In Response To Judicial Demands For Equity And Adequacy, Erin E. Buzuvis Jan 2001

"A" For Effort: Evaluating Recent State Education Reform In Response To Judicial Demands For Equity And Adequacy, Erin E. Buzuvis

Faculty Scholarship

In this Note, the Author examines measures recently enacted by New Hampshire and Vermont in response to judicial mandates for education reform. By implementing district reform measures in demographically similar environments, the reform efforts of these two states provide a valuable perspective from which to examine the education finance reform. Evaluating the experiences of these two New England states, as well as those of other states committed to education finance reform, the author contends that successful reform measures must incorporate elements of both equity and adequacy. Specifically, the Author proposes that both states' implementation of a statewide property tax is ...


Gender And Intercollegiate Athletics: Data And Myths, Julia C. Lamber Jan 2001

Gender And Intercollegiate Athletics: Data And Myths, Julia C. Lamber

Articles by Maurer Faculty

This Article explores what nondiscrimination means in the context of intercollegiate athletics. After reviewing the Department of Education's controversial Title IX Policy Interpretation, it critically examines the analytical framework used in Title IX athletic cases and concludes that commonly made analogies to litigation under Title VII of the 1964 Civil Rights Act are inapt. A major part of the Article is an empirical study, looking first at gender equity plans written by institutions of higher education for the National Collegiate Athletic Association and then at data collected from more than 325 institutions pursuant to the Equity in Athletics Disclosure ...


Academic Freedom Of Part-Time Faculty, J. Peter Byrne Jan 2001

Academic Freedom Of Part-Time Faculty, J. Peter Byrne

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

Everyone assumes that part-time faculty should enjoy a full measure of academic freedom. The American Association of University Professors (AAUP) has consistently argued for it. Martin Michaelson's draft "Academic Freedom Policy and Procedures," a touchstone for this symposium, accords academic freedom through contract to full-time and part-time faculty without distinction. A recent article in the Chronicle of Higher Education raised the alarm that "To Many Adjunct Professors, Academic Freedom Is a Myth;" nowhere did it question the normative claim that an adjunct should enjoy complete academic freedom.


Two Views Of The River: A Critique Of The Liberal Defense Of Affirmative Action, Charles R. Lawrence Iii Jan 2001

Two Views Of The River: A Critique Of The Liberal Defense Of Affirmative Action, Charles R. Lawrence Iii

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

In response to the attack on affirmative action at educational institutions, the argument that the benefits of diversity necessitate keeping affirmative action has emerged as the dominant defense of race-conscious admissions policies. Describing this argument as the “liberal defense of affirmative action,” Professor Lawrence critiques the liberal defense because it fails to challenge the manner in which traditional standards of merit perpetuate race and class privilege, and pushes aside more radically, substantive defenses of affirmative action which articulate the need to remedy past and ongoing discrimination. While recognizing the difficulties and ambivalence inherent in advancing a new vision for defending ...


Their Own Preposessions: The Establishment Clause 1999-2000, Leslie C. Griffin Jan 2001

Their Own Preposessions: The Establishment Clause 1999-2000, Leslie C. Griffin

Scholarly Works

No abstract provided.


When It's Not Apparent: Some Modest Advice To Parent Advocates For Students With Disabilities, Stephen A. Rosenbaum Jan 2001

When It's Not Apparent: Some Modest Advice To Parent Advocates For Students With Disabilities, Stephen A. Rosenbaum

Publications

In this article, I explore ways in which parents of children with disabilities can more effectively participate in educational decisionmaking and oversight. I begin by describing the federal special education statute, the IDEA (Individuals with Disabilities Education Act), as a set of procedural safeguards that are intended to result in meaningful educational benefit. IDEA's cornerstone is the individualized education program (IEP) for each child. The IEP, negotiated between school authorities and the child's family, is often an arduous and stressful process.

I first note the limitations of using litigation against local school districts as a tool to achieve ...


Note, If You Build It, They Will Come: Establishing Title Ix Compliance In Interscholastic Sports As A Foundation For Achieving Gender Equity, Amy Bauer Jan 2001

Note, If You Build It, They Will Come: Establishing Title Ix Compliance In Interscholastic Sports As A Foundation For Achieving Gender Equity, Amy Bauer

Articles

No abstract provided.


"There's No Crying In Baseball": Sports And The Legal And Social Construction Of Gender, Rhonda Reaves Jan 2001

"There's No Crying In Baseball": Sports And The Legal And Social Construction Of Gender, Rhonda Reaves

Journal Publications

This Article analyzes the view that to be taken seriously as an athlete, women must replicate the behaviors prevalent in male-dominated sports. The Article focuses on sports in the educational context as an important opportunity for legal intervention. Because the law involves the allocation of resources and the policing of behavior by the government, this discussion prompts us to ask how resources should be allocated and what kinds of behavior should be encouraged and discouraged in promoting gender equity. In particular, the analysis of sports within educational programs offers an opportunity for a critical examination of current models of athletic ...


School Liability For Peer Sexual Harassment After Davis: Shifting From Intent To Causation In Discrimination Law, Deborah L. Brake Jan 2001

School Liability For Peer Sexual Harassment After Davis: Shifting From Intent To Causation In Discrimination Law, Deborah L. Brake

Articles

This essay seeks to explain the Davis v. Monroe County Board of Education case as an interpretation of discrimination that notably and correctly focuses on how institutions cause sex-based harm, rather than on whether officials within chose institutions act with a discriminatory intent. In the process, I discuss what appears to be the implicit theory of discrimination underlying the Davis decision: that schools cause the discrimination by exacerbating the harm that results from sexual harassment by students. I then explore the significance of the deliberate indifference requirement in this context, concluding that the standard, for all its flaws, is distinct ...


The Struggle For Sex Equality In Sport And The Theory Behind Title Ix, Deborah Brake Jan 2001

The Struggle For Sex Equality In Sport And The Theory Behind Title Ix, Deborah Brake

Articles

Title IX's three-part test for measuring discrimination in the provision of athletic opportunities to male and female students has generated heated controversy in recent years. In this Article, Professor Brake discusses the theoretical underpinnings behind the three-part test and offers a comprehensive justification of this theory as applied to the context of sport. She begins with an analysis of the test's relationship to other areas of sex discrimination law, concluding that, unlike most contexts, Title IX rejects formal equality as its guiding theory, adopting instead an approach that focuses on the institutional structures that subordinate girls and women ...