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Articles 1 - 17 of 17

Full-Text Articles in Law

Should Students Have Constitutional Rights? Keeping Order In The Public Schools, Anne Proffitt Dupre Nov 1996

Should Students Have Constitutional Rights? Keeping Order In The Public Schools, Anne Proffitt Dupre

Scholarly Works

This Article focuses on how the Supreme Court's conception of the public school as either an institution of social reproduction or reconstruction, a conflict Professor Dupre maintains is deeply rooted in intellectual history, has affected the power that public schools have been afforded in matters of discipline and order. Professor Dupre argues that the Court -- by allowing the reconstruction model to influence its opinion for almost thirty years -- paved the way for the decline in school order and educational quality. Although Professor Dupre contends that the Court's recent repudiation of the reconstruction model in Vernonia School District 47J ...


Public Law And Legal Education In The Nineteenth Century: The Founding Of Burgess' School Of Political Science At Columbia, Alexa S. Bator Oct 1996

Public Law And Legal Education In The Nineteenth Century: The Founding Of Burgess' School Of Political Science At Columbia, Alexa S. Bator

Student Legal History Papers

This paper discusses the founding of the School of Political Science at Columbia University by John W. Burgess in 1880. Burgess established the political science school after failing in his attempts to introduce a program of coursework in political science and public law at Columbia's School of Law. He hoped that the new school would supplement the private-law curriculum of the law school, with the particular aim of preparing students for a career in public service.


A Feminist Revisit To The First-Year Curriculum, Anita Bernstein Jun 1996

A Feminist Revisit To The First-Year Curriculum, Anita Bernstein

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


At Loggerheads: The Supreme Court And Racial Equality In Public School Education After Missouri V. Jenkins, Roberta M. Harding Apr 1996

At Loggerheads: The Supreme Court And Racial Equality In Public School Education After Missouri V. Jenkins, Roberta M. Harding

Law Faculty Scholarly Articles

June 12th of 1995 marked a somber occasion in the annals of school desegregation litigation. On that day, the United States Supreme Court sent disturbing messages in its opinion in Missouri v. Jenkins. The Court's decision hinders achievement of the objective of school desegregation litigation—providing equal educational opportunities for African-American public school children—and detrimentally impacts other substantive areas of civil rights litigation. This article examines what I believe are several important general consequences of Jenkins's the impairment of a trial judge's discretionary equitable remedial powers; the Court's establishment of a new agenda that sacrifices ...


Free Speech Faces Hostile Environment: An Aggressive Hunt For Sex Harassment Leaves Plenty Of Wreckage, Kenneth Lasson Feb 1996

Free Speech Faces Hostile Environment: An Aggressive Hunt For Sex Harassment Leaves Plenty Of Wreckage, Kenneth Lasson

All Faculty Scholarship

Take the case of James Maas, who has been teaching at Cornell University for more than 30 years and whose Psychology 101 is perhaps the largest undergraduate course in the country (attracting about 1,000 students every semester). He was won numerous teaching awards. In 1994, Mr. Maas was called before Cornell's "Professional Ethics Committee" to defend himself against charges of sexual harassment. The allegations centered around his "overly friendly and affectionate behavior" - which, it turns out, were hugs and occasional social kisses, most often in front of class or family.

The most notable example of a professor who ...


An Evidentiary Framework For Diversity As A Compelling Interest In Higher Education, Kimberly J. Robinson Jan 1996

An Evidentiary Framework For Diversity As A Compelling Interest In Higher Education, Kimberly J. Robinson

Law Faculty Publications

This Note argues that if courts choose to reexamine evidence on the value of diversity in higher education, they should not apply the evidentiary requirements that the Supreme Court has applied to cases involving questions of past discrimination. Rather, courts should consider the unique nature of diversity in higher education and the protection afforded the academic context in which the evidence is considered and modify their review of the evidence presented accordingly. Furthermore, this Note argues that the interest of an institution of higher education16 in diversity is "compelling" in light of the evidence that a racially diverse student body ...


When A Kiss Isn't Just A Kiss: Title Ix And Student-To-Student Harassment, Verna L. Williams Jan 1996

When A Kiss Isn't Just A Kiss: Title Ix And Student-To-Student Harassment, Verna L. Williams

Faculty Articles and Other Publications

This article discusses peer hostile environment sexual harassment. It examines the circuit court caselaw on the issue and the legislative history of Title IX, provides an overview of the Supreme Court precedent interpreting Title IX, outlines the Department of Education’s interpretation of Title IX’s requirements concerning peer hostile environment sexual harassment, and discusses analogous legal principles underlying the analysis of student-to-student hostile environment sexual harassment.


The Children We Abandon: Religious Exemptions To Child Welfare And Education Law As Denials Of Equal Protection To Children Of Religious Objectors, James G. Dwyer Jan 1996

The Children We Abandon: Religious Exemptions To Child Welfare And Education Law As Denials Of Equal Protection To Children Of Religious Objectors, James G. Dwyer

Faculty Publications

The story of children who die because their parents, in observance of their own religious principles, withhold conventional medical treatment from them is a familiar one. In this Article, James G. Dwyer shows that the phenomenon of parents denying secular benefits to their children for religious reasons goes far beyond these few highly publicized cases, extending into the realm of education as well as medical care. Moreover, Dr. Dwyer shows that the federal and state governments endorse this practice by statutorily exempting 'religious objector' parents from otherwise generally applicable compulsory child care and education laws. He argues that courts addressing ...


Law, Governance, And Academic And Disciplinary Decisions In Australian Universities: An American Perspective, Fernand N. Dutile Jan 1996

Law, Governance, And Academic And Disciplinary Decisions In Australian Universities: An American Perspective, Fernand N. Dutile

Journal Articles

No abstract provided.


Assessing The Efficacy Of School Desegregation, Michael Heise Jan 1996

Assessing The Efficacy Of School Desegregation, Michael Heise

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Squaring Affirmative Action Admissions Policies With Federal Judicial Guidelines: A Model For The Twenty-First Century, Leslie Y. Garfield Jan 1996

Squaring Affirmative Action Admissions Policies With Federal Judicial Guidelines: A Model For The Twenty-First Century, Leslie Y. Garfield

Elisabeth Haub School of Law Faculty Publications

This article will highlight the legal limitations law schools confront when adopting diversity admission policies in light of the new judicial climate that disfavors considering non-traditional race criteria in the admission decision process. Part I highlights the difficulty law schools face when trying to admit a fully diverse class under the traditional application process. Part II discusses the judicial response to voluntary diversity admission policies and other race-based preference policies and defines the appropriate standard for court review. Part III proposes a model diversity admission policy. Part IV analyzes this model policy under the Court's strict scrutiny test.


The Promise Of State Constitutionalism: Can It Be Fulfilled In Shef V. O'Neill?, Gayl S. Westerman Jan 1996

The Promise Of State Constitutionalism: Can It Be Fulfilled In Shef V. O'Neill?, Gayl S. Westerman

Elisabeth Haub School of Law Faculty Publications

This Article reflects on the anomaly of the superior court's decision in Sheff in light of this recent history and recommends that the Connecticut Supreme Court use an alternative, analytical framework based on the Connecticut Constitution to decide the Sheff appeal. This independent approach is equally available to all state courts seeking to resolve fundamental issues under their own constitutions. Only by speaking in a clear, state voice can state courts balance the constitutional vision of the federal courts and fulfill the promise of the state constitutional law movement.


The Latest Home Education Challenge: The Relationship Between Home Schools And Public Schools, Lisa Lukasik Jan 1996

The Latest Home Education Challenge: The Relationship Between Home Schools And Public Schools, Lisa Lukasik

Scholarly Works

No abstract provided.


The Violence Against Women Act Project: Teaching A New Generation Of Public Interest Lawyers, Minna J. Kotkin Jan 1996

The Violence Against Women Act Project: Teaching A New Generation Of Public Interest Lawyers, Minna J. Kotkin

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Running The Gauntlet No More - Using Title Ix To End Student-To-Student Sexual Harassment, Verna L. Williams Jan 1996

Running The Gauntlet No More - Using Title Ix To End Student-To-Student Sexual Harassment, Verna L. Williams

Faculty Articles and Other Publications

Reports on the decision of the United States Supreme Court in Davis v. Monroe Board of Education which dealt with student-on-student sexual harassment.


Hopwood: Was This The African-American Nightmare Or The African-American Dream?, Kevin D. Brown Jan 1996

Hopwood: Was This The African-American Nightmare Or The African-American Dream?, Kevin D. Brown

Articles by Maurer Faculty

No abstract provided.


Reflections On The Limitations Of Rational Discourse, Empirical Data, And Legal Mandates As Tools For The Achievement Of Gender Equity In American Higher Education, Susan J. Scollay, Carolyn S. Bratt Jan 1996

Reflections On The Limitations Of Rational Discourse, Empirical Data, And Legal Mandates As Tools For The Achievement Of Gender Equity In American Higher Education, Susan J. Scollay, Carolyn S. Bratt

Law Faculty Scholarly Articles

Scholars and academicians implicitly accept and subscribe to the notion that reasoned discourse supported by empirical data is at the core of the academic enterprise. Theoretically, then, organizational change within the academy ought to be attainable through the use of rational processes based upon the systematic collection, analysis, and interpretation of data to define the scope of the problem and to identify logical solutions. However, the centuries-long attempt to achieve gender equity for women in institutions of higher education belies the truth of that belief in the power of reason as a catalyst for reforming American higher education.

Beginning with ...