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Articles 1 - 8 of 8

Full-Text Articles in Law

Law, Culture, And Children With Disabilities: Educational Rights And The Construction Of Difference, David M. Engel Feb 1991

Law, Culture, And Children With Disabilities: Educational Rights And The Construction Of Difference, David M. Engel

Journal Articles

No abstract provided.


Foreword: Racist Speech On Campus, Kingsley R. Browne Jan 1991

Foreword: Racist Speech On Campus, Kingsley R. Browne

Law Faculty Research Publications

No abstract provided.


Doe V. University Of Michigan And Campus Bans On "Racist Speech": The View From Within, Robert A. Sedler Jan 1991

Doe V. University Of Michigan And Campus Bans On "Racist Speech": The View From Within, Robert A. Sedler

Law Faculty Research Publications

No abstract provided.


Judicial Enforcement Of The Right To An Equal Education In Illinois, 12 N. Ill. U. L. Rev. 45 (1991), Michael P. Seng, Michael R. Booden Jan 1991

Judicial Enforcement Of The Right To An Equal Education In Illinois, 12 N. Ill. U. L. Rev. 45 (1991), Michael P. Seng, Michael R. Booden

UIC Law Open Access Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Racial Insults And Free Speech Within The University, J. Peter Byrne Jan 1991

Racial Insults And Free Speech Within The University, J. Peter Byrne

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

This article examines the constitutionality of university prohibitions of public expression that insults members of the academic community by directing hatred or contempt toward them on account of their race. Several thoughtful scholars have examined generally whether the government can penalize citizens for racist slurs under the first amendment, but to the limited extent that they have discussed university disciplinary codes they have assumed that the state university is merely a government instrumentality subject to the same constitutional limitations as, for example, the legislature or the police. In contrast, I argue that the university has a fundamentally different relationship to ...


Comment On Preliminary Report On Freedom Of Expression And Campus Harassment Codes, Terrance Sandalow Jan 1991

Comment On Preliminary Report On Freedom Of Expression And Campus Harassment Codes, Terrance Sandalow

Articles

Campus harassment codes pose an unprecedented problem for the AAUP, not only because the issues of academic freedom they raise are novel, but also because the academic community is itself deeply divided over those issues. Historically, the major assaults upon academic freedom have come from outside the academy--from politicians, trustees, and donors who have sought to limit inquiry and restrict the expression of unpopular views. Ideas about academic freedom have been shaped in the course of repelling these assaults and in constructing barricades that will safeguard the freedoms to teach and to learn that are at the center of the ...


The Moral Responsibilities Of Universities, Terrance Sandalow Jan 1991

The Moral Responsibilities Of Universities, Terrance Sandalow

Book Chapters

IN THE YEARS SINCE the Second World War, "higher education" has emerged as one of the major influences in American life. Well over 50 percent of the age cohort now in its teens or early twenties will attend a college or university, more than a five-fold increase from the prewar period. Moreover, colleges and universities now engage in so broad a range of activities that the appellation "higher education" no longer seems entirely appropriate to describe the institutions. Community colleges, but also four-year colleges and universities, play a major role in training individuals for skilled and semiskilled occupations. Universities are ...


Voice, Not Choice, James S. Liebman Jan 1991

Voice, Not Choice, James S. Liebman

Faculty Scholarship

In John Chubb and Terry Moe's book, choice is hot; voice is not. As influential as their book has become in current policy debates, however, its data and reasoning may support policies the reverse of those that the authors and their "New Paradigm" disciples propose. In this review, voice is hot; choice is not.