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Full-Text Articles in Law

Getting At The Root Instead Of The Branch: Extinguishing The Stereotype Of Black Intellectual Inferiority In American Education, A Long-Ignored Transitional Justice Project, Camille Lamar Jan 2020

Getting At The Root Instead Of The Branch: Extinguishing The Stereotype Of Black Intellectual Inferiority In American Education, A Long-Ignored Transitional Justice Project, Camille Lamar

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Video: Nova Law Review Symposium: Shutting Down The School To Prison Pipeline, Nova Law Review Sep 2015

Video: Nova Law Review Symposium: Shutting Down The School To Prison Pipeline, Nova Law Review

NSU Law Seminar Series

NSU Law, the Nova Law Review, and a broad coalition of nonprofit organizations have come together to build a national platform to address the crisis of unnecessary incarceration for teens. Academics, practitioners, policy-makers, educators, community activists, and thought leaders are invited to exchange ideas, form effective strategies, and engage in meaningful dialogue about systemic change for educational reform and new approaches to school discipline.

To see photographs from the Symposium, please look at the Symposium Flickr group.


Education Rights And The New Due Process, Areto A. Imoukhuede Jan 2014

Education Rights And The New Due Process, Areto A. Imoukhuede

Faculty Scholarship

This Article argues for a human dignity-based, due process clause analysis to recognize the fundamental duty of government to provide high quality, public education. Access to public education is a fundamental duty, or positive fundamental right because education is a basic human need and a constituent part of all democratic rights.


Beg, Borrow, Or Steal: Ten Lessons Law Schools Can Learn From Other Educational Programs In Evaluating Their Curriculums, Debra Curtis Jan 2014

Beg, Borrow, Or Steal: Ten Lessons Law Schools Can Learn From Other Educational Programs In Evaluating Their Curriculums, Debra Curtis

Faculty Scholarship

INDISPUTABLY, LAW SCHOOLS are under attack.' Because of concerns about the legal field and legal education's responsibility in the crisis of new graduates without jobs, law schools are clamoring to respond by seeking and working toward curriculum change. Generally, higher education institutions acknowledge a "responsibility to endeavour to prepare graduates who are able to manage and respond effectively to change and its inherent demands challenges and tensions." However, there are questions about law schools' ability to do just that. There have been many years of repeated criticisms of the case method and active discussions regarding curriculum reform.


Freedom From Ignorance: The International Duty To Provide Public Education, Areto A. Imoukhuede Jan 2013

Freedom From Ignorance: The International Duty To Provide Public Education, Areto A. Imoukhuede

Faculty Scholarship

This paper argues that public education is an international human right that the U.S. ought to recognise and protect. Recognising a right to public education would correct a major inconsistency in U.S. law by bringing education rights docrtine more in line with international human rights law. This piece discusses how current U.S. education rights doctrine is inconsistent with U.S. tradition and legal precedent. It then demonstrates how international law recognises public education as a fundamental duty of government before arguing for why the U.S. is obligated to follow international law regarding the right to public ...


The Fifth Freedom: The Constitutional Duty To Provide Public Education, Areto Imoukhuede Jan 2011

The Fifth Freedom: The Constitutional Duty To Provide Public Education, Areto Imoukhuede

Faculty Scholarship

“The fifth freedom is freedom from ignorance. It means that every[one], everywhere, should be free to develop his [or her] talents to their full potential – unhampered by arbitrary barriers of race or birth or income.” Lyndon B. Johnson This article argues that education is a fundamental human right that the U.S. Supreme Court has failed to recognize because of the Court’s bias towards negative, rather than positive rights. Viewed from the limited perspective of rights as liberties, the concern with declaring a fundamental right to education is that education legislation would be strictly scrutinized, thus causing the ...


The Use Of Video-Conferencing Technology In Legal Education: A Practical Guide, Catherine Arcabascio Jan 2001

The Use Of Video-Conferencing Technology In Legal Education: A Practical Guide, Catherine Arcabascio

Faculty Scholarship

This article explores the use of advanced computer technologies to offer distance learning programs in United States law schools. It begins with an explanation of the original distance learning methods and differentiates them from current methods that incorporate computer-based technologies. The article also explains the different types of technologies available for use in distance learning and describes the model currently in use at the Shepard Broad Law Center at Nova Southeastern University ("Law Center"). Finally, it discusses the pedagogical and planning issues that arise when using this technology, the hardware that is required, and the costs associated with this type ...