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Full-Text Articles in Law

Bigotry, Civility, And Reinvigorating Civic Education: Government's Formative Task Amidst Polarization, Linda C. Mcclain Mar 2020

Bigotry, Civility, And Reinvigorating Civic Education: Government's Formative Task Amidst Polarization, Linda C. Mcclain

Faculty Scholarship

In the U.S. and around the globe, concerns over a decline in civility and tolerance and a surge in lethal extremist violence motivated by hatred of religious and racial groups make condemning—and preventing—hatred and bigotry seem urgent. What meaning can the ideal of e pluribus unum (“out of many one”) have in this fraught and polarized environment? Within the U.S., a long line of jurists, politicians, and educators have invoked civic education in public schools as vital to preserving constitutional democracy and a healthy pluralism. How can schools carry out such a civic role in times ...


Taming Title Ix Tensions, Naomi Mann Feb 2018

Taming Title Ix Tensions, Naomi Mann

Faculty Scholarship

The appropriate parameters for sexual assault disciplinary proceedings in public colleges and universities have historically been hotly contested. In recent years, the debate has focused on two competing sets of rights—the more established Title IX rights of the victim and the evolving constitutionally-based procedural due process rights of the accused. This debate over whose rights should be prioritized—those of the victim or those of the accused—is a classic civil rights enforcement dynamic. How can educational institutions effectuate the equality mandate of Title IX while not infringing on the constitutionally-based procedural due process rights of the accused? The ...


Patent Variation: Discerning Diversity Among Patent Functions, Jessica Silbey Jan 2013

Patent Variation: Discerning Diversity Among Patent Functions, Jessica Silbey

Faculty Scholarship

This Article describes and analyzes qualitative interview data collected over a five-year period. The goal of the interviews was to explore the roles of intellectual property (“IP”) in IP rich fields. Interviews were with diverse actors in a wide-range of industries: film, book publishing, visual arts, internet commerce, biology, engineering, chemistry, computer science. The data described and analyzed in this Article focuses on the specific question about the diverse functioning of patents in the subset of interviewees who are scientists and engineers, their lawyers and business partners. The Article proceeds in two parts. Part I describes the empirical dimension of ...


Dead Document Walking, Gary Lawson Jul 2012

Dead Document Walking, Gary Lawson

Faculty Scholarship

As this symposium commences, originalism is a hot topic to discuss and a cool position to advocate. Either portion of that statement would have been nearly inconceivable two decades ago when I started in academia. Originalism at that time was something of an intellectual backwater, with a very limited set of adherents and an even more limited set of critics who were willing to take originalist ideas seriously.1


Truth, Justice, And The Libertarian Way(S), Gary Lawson Jul 2011

Truth, Justice, And The Libertarian Way(S), Gary Lawson

Faculty Scholarship

More than twenty years ago, I was commissioned to write an article – my very first scholarly article – on “the ethics of insider trading” (this was hot on the heels of the Ivan Boesky insider-trading scandal of the mid-1980s).1 After tracing philosophical debates concerning the morality of exchanges based on unequal information from Cicero and Aquinas through Henry Manne and Frank Easterbrook,2 I had to decide what I could responsibly say in a scholarly work as a matter of substantive moral theory about the practice of insider trading – and derivatively what it would be appropriate to say normatively in ...


Panel I: Professor Brodley’S General Contributions To Antitrust Scholarship : Introduction, Keith Hylton Aug 2010

Panel I: Professor Brodley’S General Contributions To Antitrust Scholarship : Introduction, Keith Hylton

Faculty Scholarship

When I began teaching Antitrust, I was the junior colleague of a more senior antitrust scholar, teaching the course on opposite semesters to the relatively few students who were forced by scheduling conflicts to take the course with me as their teacher. After my senior colleague departed for another school – and after the departure of some other senior Law and Economics colleagues – I was for a brief period the senior antitrust scholar at the institution, and this was in only my fifth year of teaching law. Boston University soon approached me and my wife with the offer of appointments, and ...


Autism In The Us: Social Movement And Legal Change, Daniela Caruso Jan 2010

Autism In The Us: Social Movement And Legal Change, Daniela Caruso

Faculty Scholarship

The social movement surrounding autism in the US has been rightly defined a ray of light in the history of social progress. The movement is inspired by a true understanding of neuro-diversity and is capable of bringing about desirable change in political discourse. At several points along the way, however, the legal reforms prompted by the autism movement have been grafted onto preexisting patterns of inequality in the allocation of welfare, education, and medical services. In a context most recently complicated by economic recession, autism-driven change bears the mark of political contingency and legal fragmentation. Distributively, it yields ambivalent results ...


Reconsidering Gobitis: An Exercise In Presidential Leadership, Robert L. Tsai Jan 2008

Reconsidering Gobitis: An Exercise In Presidential Leadership, Robert L. Tsai

Faculty Scholarship

In June of 1940, the Supreme Court ruled 8-1 in Minersville School District v. Gobitis that the First Amendment posed no barrier to the punishment of two school age Jehovah's Witnesses who refused to pay homage to the American flag. Three years later, the Justices reversed themselves in West Virginia State Board of Education v. Barnette. This sudden change has prompted a host of explanations. Some observers have stressed changes in judicial personnel in the intervening years; others have pointed to the wax and wane of general anxieties over the war; still others have emphasized the sympathy-inspiring acts of ...


Democracy's Handmaid, Robert L. Tsai Jan 2006

Democracy's Handmaid, Robert L. Tsai

Faculty Scholarship

Democratic theory presupposes open channels of dialogue, but focuses almost exclusively on matters of institutional design writ large. The philosophy of language explicates linguistic infrastructure, but often avoids exploring the political significance of its findings. In this Article, I draw from the two disciplines to reach new insights about the democracy enhancing qualities of popular constitutional language. Employing examples from the founding era, the struggle for black civil rights, the religious awakening of the last two decades, and the search for gay equality, I present a model of constitutional dialogue that emphasizes common modalities and mobilized vernacular. According to this ...


For Whom Does The Bell Toll: The Bell Tolls For Brown?, Angela Onwuachi-Willig May 2005

For Whom Does The Bell Toll: The Bell Tolls For Brown?, Angela Onwuachi-Willig

Faculty Scholarship

This review essay analyzes Derrick Bell's provocative new book, Silent Covenants: Brown v. Board of Education and the Unfulfilled Hopes for Racial Reform (2004). In Silent Covenants, Professor Bell reviews Brown v. Board of Education, and inquires "whether another approach than the one embraced by the Brown decision might have been more effective and less disruptive in the always-contentious racial arena." Specifically, Professor Bell joins black conservatives in critiquing what he describes as a misguided focus on achieving racial balance in schools and argues that the quality of education for minority children, in particular Blacks, would have been better ...


Bargaining And Distribution In Special Education, Daniela Caruso Jan 2005

Bargaining And Distribution In Special Education, Daniela Caruso

Faculty Scholarship

The problem of unequal access to educational services in the US has received the attention of courts and legislators for several decades. A traditional source of inequality, increasingly addressed by scholars and law-makers, is the discrimination against students with disabilities, who were once deprived tout court of real educational opportunities.' In this field, legislative intervention has been momentous and political forces across ideological lines have converged to provide children with disabilities proper access to public learning. The reform of special education has achieved tangible results in the last thirty years and has provided children with unprecedented opportunities.


The Republic Of Choice, The Pledge Of Allegiance, The American Taliban, Pnina Lahav Jan 2005

The Republic Of Choice, The Pledge Of Allegiance, The American Taliban, Pnina Lahav

Faculty Scholarship

In two important books, The Republic of Choice and The Horizontal Society, published in 1990 and 1999 respectively, Lawrence M. Friedman presents his theories of a massive social transformation which occurred in the last century. I wish to examine these theories through the prism of two cases: Elk Grove Unified School District v. Newdow3 and Hamdi v. Rumsfeld,4 both decided in the spring of 2004. Both Newdow and Hamdi have been at the center of public controversy for many months; each case carries many of the ingredients presented in Friedman's The Republic of Choice and The Horizontal Society ...