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Series

Contracts

2001

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Articles 1 - 30 of 37

Full-Text Articles in Law

Tortious Interference And The Law Of Contract: The Case For Specific Performance Revisited, Deepa Varadarajan Dec 2001

Tortious Interference And The Law Of Contract: The Case For Specific Performance Revisited, Deepa Varadarajan

Faculty Publications By Year

No abstract provided.


Trade Secrets, Non-Competes, And Unfair Competition, Office Of Continuing Legal Education At The University Of Kentucky College Of Law Oct 2001

Trade Secrets, Non-Competes, And Unfair Competition, Office Of Continuing Legal Education At The University Of Kentucky College Of Law

Continuing Legal Education Materials

Materials from the conference on Trade Secrets, Non-Competes, and Unfair Competition held by UK/CLE in October 2001.


Contract Reconceived, Peter A. Alces Oct 2001

Contract Reconceived, Peter A. Alces

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Restitution And Equity: An Analysis Of The Principle Of Unjust Enrichment, Emily Sherwin Jun 2001

Restitution And Equity: An Analysis Of The Principle Of Unjust Enrichment, Emily Sherwin

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


3rd Annual Computer & Technology Law Institute, Office Of Continuing Legal Education At The University Of Kentucky College Of Law Mar 2001

3rd Annual Computer & Technology Law Institute, Office Of Continuing Legal Education At The University Of Kentucky College Of Law

Continuing Legal Education Materials

Materials from the 3rd Annual Computer & Technology Law Institute held by UK/CLE in March 2001.


When Do Rights Arise Under The Contracts (Rights Of Third Parties) Act 1999 (Uk)?, Tiong Min Yeo Mar 2001

When Do Rights Arise Under The Contracts (Rights Of Third Parties) Act 1999 (Uk)?, Tiong Min Yeo

Research Collection Yong Pung How School Of Law

There are two aspects to the common law doctrine of privity of contract. The first, that a contract cannot impose liabilities on a third party, is not very controversial. The second, that in general a contract can only confer rights on parties to the contract even if it is clearly the intention of the contracting parties to benefit a third party, is highly controversial, and has been the subject of much judicial criticism.


The Written Contract As Safe Harbor For Dishonest Conduct, Lawrence Solan Jan 2001

The Written Contract As Safe Harbor For Dishonest Conduct, Lawrence Solan

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


New Horizons In Cartel Detection, Jonathan Baker Jan 2001

New Horizons In Cartel Detection, Jonathan Baker

Articles in Law Reviews & Other Academic Journals

No abstract provided.


Payment Methods For Consumer-To-Consumer Online Transactions, 35 Akron L. Rev. 1 (2001), David E. Sorkin Jan 2001

Payment Methods For Consumer-To-Consumer Online Transactions, 35 Akron L. Rev. 1 (2001), David E. Sorkin

UIC Law Open Access Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Downtown Code: A History Of The Uniform Commercial Code 1949-1954, 49 Buff. L. Rev. 359 (2001), Allen R. Kamp Jan 2001

Downtown Code: A History Of The Uniform Commercial Code 1949-1954, 49 Buff. L. Rev. 359 (2001), Allen R. Kamp

UIC Law Open Access Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Quantum Meruit For The Subcontractor: Has Restitution Jumped Off Dawson's Dock?, Doug Rendleman Jan 2001

Quantum Meruit For The Subcontractor: Has Restitution Jumped Off Dawson's Dock?, Doug Rendleman

Scholarly Articles

No abstract provided.


Reinventing The Deal: A Sequential Approach To Analyzing Claims For Enforcement Of Modified Sales Contracts, Irma S. Russell Jan 2001

Reinventing The Deal: A Sequential Approach To Analyzing Claims For Enforcement Of Modified Sales Contracts, Irma S. Russell

Faculty Law Review Articles

This article considers whether providing additional content to the concept of good faith in the area of contract modification is possible or desirable. The article explores the modification puzzle and the issues of erratic justice that result from the nebulous nature of the UCC test, and evaluates an alternative test (the sequential approach) that scrutinizes each step of the modification process and imports the standard of reasonable grounds into this context.

Part II discusses terminology and fundamental concepts in this area of law, including the reasons for seeking a modification, the steps of a modification, and the typical defense to …


The Wharf (Holdings) Ltd. V. United International Holdings, Inc.: The Supreme Court Breaks Old Ground, Mark J. Loewenstein Jan 2001

The Wharf (Holdings) Ltd. V. United International Holdings, Inc.: The Supreme Court Breaks Old Ground, Mark J. Loewenstein

Publications

This article analyzes the Supreme Court's decision to decide only one federal securities law case, The Wharf (Holdings) Ltd. v. United International Holdings, Inc. On the face of it, the Court simply affirmed long-standing, uncontroversial tenets of Rule 10b-5. However, the article provides different explanations to the Court's decision.


Placid, Clear-Seeming Words: Some Realism About The New Formalism (With Particular Attention To Promissory Estoppel), Sidney Delong Jan 2001

Placid, Clear-Seeming Words: Some Realism About The New Formalism (With Particular Attention To Promissory Estoppel), Sidney Delong

Faculty Articles

This Article examines the recent doctrinal shift from realist jurisprudence to the “new formalism” as it arises in the creation of contract obligation. Many recent decisions involving promissory estoppel appear to display a trend away from reliance protection in the commercial world. While these decisions are formalist insofar as they favor textual forms over contextual forms, the Author argues that this trend is more properly characterized as a realist effort. This Article examines promissory estoppel in the commercial world and suggests that the “new formalism”, driven by the most “realist” of motives, will expunge liability for promissory estoppel in the …


Language And Formalities In Commercial Contracts: A Defense Of Custom And Conduct, David Snyder Jan 2001

Language And Formalities In Commercial Contracts: A Defense Of Custom And Conduct, David Snyder

Articles in Law Reviews & Other Academic Journals

This article defends the decision to retain usage of trade, course of performance, and course of dealing in the revision of Article 1 of the Uniform Commercial Code. The article responds to recent neoformalist criticisms of the incorporation approach and offers a theoretical justification. Usage of trade and course of dealing should be understood as part of the parties' language, following Wittgenstein's understanding of language. Course of performance, which presents a weaker case in terms of language, should be understood as a legal formality, following Fuller's explanation of formalities. Thus understood, custom and conduct can be as important as written …


The Influence Of Marvin V. Marvin On Housework During Marriage, Margaret F. Brinig Jan 2001

The Influence Of Marvin V. Marvin On Housework During Marriage, Margaret F. Brinig

Journal Articles

When Michelle Marvin was forced to leave the home she shared with what today we would call her partner, Lee Marvin, she had a number of problems. The first ones, of course, were legal: she had no marriage with Lee and no written contract that could distinguish their relationship from "mere cohabitation." Nor had she contributed directly to his career or other assets. What she alleged was his express promise to "take care of her" (for some time period that was not altogether clear) and, less obviously, a promise implied by all she had done with and for him during …


Contracting With Electronic Agents, Anthony J. Bellia Jan 2001

Contracting With Electronic Agents, Anthony J. Bellia

Journal Articles

Established contract doctrine provides no clear answer to the question whether exchanges arranged by the interaction of electronic agents are enforceable. This Article explores whether the law should enforce exchanges arranged by the interaction of electronic agents. It examine how normative theories of contractual obligation inform the issue, with an eye toward the strengths and weaknesses of each theory. The theories that most strongly support the enforcement of exchanges arranged by electronic agents, this Article explains, are those that ground contractual obligation in protecting the ability of individuals to pursue their reasonable objectives through reliable arrangements.


Doctors, Hmos, Erisa, And The Public Interest After Pegram V. Herdrich, Jeffrey W. Stempel, Nadia Von Magdenko Jan 2001

Doctors, Hmos, Erisa, And The Public Interest After Pegram V. Herdrich, Jeffrey W. Stempel, Nadia Von Magdenko

Scholarly Works

The Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 was enacted in the wake of highly publicized pension disasters in order to protect employee pension rights. Born as a piece of pro-worker legislation, it initially was criticized by business groups as a cause of bureaucratic arteriosclerosis that was worse than the disease of pension failures. Even worse, it prompted many employers to consider dispensing with pension plans altogether rather than struggle with the administrative and financial obligations of ERISA. Business, labor, and the public all complained about the law's complexity. It even became something of a national joke as regulators took …


Recent Case Developments, Jeffrey W. Stempel Jan 2001

Recent Case Developments, Jeffrey W. Stempel

Scholarly Works

Recent case developments in Insurance Law in the years 2000 and 2001.


Ohio: A Microcosm Of Tort Reform Versus State Constitutional Mandates, Stephen J. Werber Jan 2001

Ohio: A Microcosm Of Tort Reform Versus State Constitutional Mandates, Stephen J. Werber

Law Faculty Articles and Essays

Tort reform emanates, for our purposes, from two primary bodies: state judicial and legislative branches. The vast panoply of congressional and regulatory federal action that bears on the protections afforded and rights to recover for persons within their ambit is a subject for another day. Similarly, the rare areas in which the Supreme Court of the United States establishes federal common law are subjects for another day. On a national scale, the impetus for state legislative reform action can be found in a series of landmark decisions that were soon adopted, in largely similar form, by almost all state supreme …


Rationalising Restitutionary Damages In Contract Law: An Elusive Or Illusory Ques, Andrew Phang, Pey Woan Lee Jan 2001

Rationalising Restitutionary Damages In Contract Law: An Elusive Or Illusory Ques, Andrew Phang, Pey Woan Lee

Research Collection Yong Pung How School Of Law

The present article surveys various issues in the law relating to the award of restitutionary damages in contract law, utilising as its point of focus the recent House of Lords decision in Attorney-General v Blake. It explores, in particular, two possible (albeit quite different) routes towards the recovery of such damages; the first based on the (more traditional) compensatory basis and the second on the (more controversial) restitutionary basis for disgorgement of the defendant's gain. While we argue that there is, on a more general level, no overriding objection in principle to the award of restitutionary damages for cynical breach …


What's My Copy Right?, Michael J. Madison Jan 2001

What's My Copy Right?, Michael J. Madison

Articles

This piece consists of an early 21st century whimsy, a dialogue that borrows and blends history and humor to illustrate some puzzles of copyright law in the context of digital technology (with references to Folsom v. Marsh and Abbott & Costello).


An Inconsistently Sensitive Mind: Richard Posner's Celebration Of Insurance Law And Continuing Blind Spots Of Econominalism, Jeffrey W. Stempel Jan 2001

An Inconsistently Sensitive Mind: Richard Posner's Celebration Of Insurance Law And Continuing Blind Spots Of Econominalism, Jeffrey W. Stempel

Scholarly Works

Seventh Circuit Judge Richard Posner is well known for bringing economic analysis to bear on a host of issues, including infamously controversial notions such the market for baby sale. Not surprisingly, Posner's insurance law opinions reflect economics, but perhaps not to the degree one would expect. A review of Posner's 20 years of opinions relating to insurance issues reviews his pragmatic jurisprudence as well. Decisions frequently reflect not only economics but also situational context and considerations of business reality as well as a sophisticated grasp of basic insurance doctrine and contract law. As a general matter, Posner also displays considerably …


Recent Case Developments, Jeffrey W. Stempel Jan 2001

Recent Case Developments, Jeffrey W. Stempel

Scholarly Works

Recent case developments in Insurance Law in the years 2000 and 2001.


A Brief History Of Anticipatory Repudiation In American Contract Law, Keith A. Rowley Jan 2001

A Brief History Of Anticipatory Repudiation In American Contract Law, Keith A. Rowley

Scholarly Works

This article traces the evolution of the doctrine of anticipatory repudiation from its foundations laid years before the landmark case of Hochster v. De la Tour, 118 Eng. Rep. 922 (Q.B. 1853), through Hochster, its growing acceptance by American courts in the late-1800s and early-1900s, its canonization in the first Restatement of Contracts (despite the Restatement's principal Reporter's personal objections to the doctrine), its codification in the Uniform Commercial Code, its standardization in the Restatement (Second) of Contracts, and its inclusion in the U.N. Convention on Contracts for the International Sale of Goods. This article devotes considerable attention not only …


The Uniform Computer Information Transactions Act: A Well Built Fence Or Barbed Wire Around The Intellectual Commons, Warigia M. Bowman Jan 2001

The Uniform Computer Information Transactions Act: A Well Built Fence Or Barbed Wire Around The Intellectual Commons, Warigia M. Bowman

Articles, Chapters in Books and Other Contributions to Scholarly Works

The Uniform Computer Information Transactions Act (UCITA) is a proposed state contract law developed to regulate transactions in intangible goods such as computer software, online databases and other digital products.' UCITA was intended to act as Article 2B of the Uniform Commercial Code (UCC). Article 2 comprises the law governing commercial transactions in the sale of goods and ensures consistent contract laws from state to state. The stated goal of UCITA is to provide clarity regarding computer information transactions.


Tortious Interference And The Law Of Contract: The Case For Specific Performance Revisited, Deepa Varadarajan Jan 2001

Tortious Interference And The Law Of Contract: The Case For Specific Performance Revisited, Deepa Varadarajan

Faculty Publications

What is the role of contract law in remedying breach? The question of the appropriate legal remedy, specific performance versus money damages, has provided adequate fodder for three decades of debate in the law and economics discourse. In the legal discipline at large, the topic has spurred centuries of debate, as illustrated by Oliver Wendell Holmes's famous line: “The only universal consequence of a legally binding promise is, that the law makes the promisor pay damages if the promised event does not come to pass.” Holmes's approach to contractual remedy would evolve during the latter half of the twentieth century …


Reinventing The Deal: A Sequential Approach To Analyzing Claims For Enforcement Of Modified Sales Contracts, Irma S. Russell Jan 2001

Reinventing The Deal: A Sequential Approach To Analyzing Claims For Enforcement Of Modified Sales Contracts, Irma S. Russell

Faculty Works

No abstract provided.


Comparing The General Good Faith Provisions Of The Pecl And The Ucc: Appearance And Reality, Harry Flechtner Jan 2001

Comparing The General Good Faith Provisions Of The Pecl And The Ucc: Appearance And Reality, Harry Flechtner

Articles

"Good faith" is a notoriously amorphous and variable concept. Thus it is the interpretation and application of the concept that provides the most important points of comparison for the good faith provisions of the Principles of European Contract Law ("PECL") and the Uniform Commercial Code ("UCC") . The UCC has been in force since the 1950's, and its good faith provisions have been applied in hundreds of cases. In contrast, the PECL is a new phenomenon and its good faith rules have not been applied to actual cases. The comment to PECL Article 1:201, however, includes five concrete illustrations of …


The Property/Contract Interface, Thomas W. Merrill, Henry E. Smith Jan 2001

The Property/Contract Interface, Thomas W. Merrill, Henry E. Smith

Faculty Scholarship

This Article explores the distinction between in personam contract rights and in rem property rights. It presents a functional explanation for why the legal system utilizes these two modalities of rights, grounded in the pattern of information costs associated with each modality. To test this theory, the Article examines four legal institutions that fall along the property/contract interface – bailments, landlord-tenant law, security interests, and trusts – in order to determine how the legal doctrine varies as the underlying situation shifts from in personam, to in rem, to certain relations intermediate between these poles. With respect to each institution, we …