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Series

Contracts

1998

Research Collection Yong Pung How School Of Law

Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Law

Is There A Duty To Negotiate In Good Faith?, Michael Philip Furmston Jul 1998

Is There A Duty To Negotiate In Good Faith?, Michael Philip Furmston

Research Collection Yong Pung How School Of Law

One of the most interesting questions concerning modern contract lawyers is whether, and if so when, there may be a duty on parties to a contract to negotiate in good faith? This may seem an odd question for an English lawyer to raise, granted the refusal of the House of Lords in Walford v. Miles [1992] 2 A.C. 128 to recognise even the effectiveness of an agreement to negotiate in good faith but this case has not escaped cogent criticism (Neill (1992) 108 L.Q.R. 405) and it rests on an axiom (that this is a duty which cannot be enforced) …


Commentary On 'The Renegotiation Of Contracts', Howard Hunter Jan 1998

Commentary On 'The Renegotiation Of Contracts', Howard Hunter

Research Collection Yong Pung How School Of Law

Professor John Carter has identified a theme of growing importance in commercial transactions, especially as the number of those that are long in duration and that cross political or cultural lines increases. It is difficult under the best of circumstances ex ante to negotiate for all contingencies in a dynamic economy. Allowing, or requiring, post hoc renegotiations every time there is a change in circumstances could reduce substantially the utility of contract as a risk allocation device that provides some measure of privately ordered certainty unless the use of post hoc renegotiation is carefully circumscribed.


Commentary On 'Assignment Of Contractual Burdens', Howard Hunter Jan 1998

Commentary On 'Assignment Of Contractual Burdens', Howard Hunter

Research Collection Yong Pung How School Of Law

Professor Michael Furmston begins his fine paper with the statement that ‘Contract textbooks treat it as axiomatic that contractual burdens cannot be assigned’. This commentary can begin with the equally forceful statement that contract textbooks in the United States treat as axiomatic the proposition that most contractual burdens can be freely assigned.