Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Law Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Articles 1 - 23 of 23

Full-Text Articles in Law

Note: The Lesson Of Lopez: The Political Dynamics Of Federalism's Political Safeguards, Daniel A. Lyons Dec 2005

Note: The Lesson Of Lopez: The Political Dynamics Of Federalism's Political Safeguards, Daniel A. Lyons

Boston College Law School Faculty Papers

No abstract provided.


Development Theory And Foundations Of Universal Access Policies, Caio M. Pereira Neto Aug 2005

Development Theory And Foundations Of Universal Access Policies, Caio M. Pereira Neto

Student Scholarship Papers

This article discusses the justifications to implement public policies towards widespread access to information and communications technologies (ICTs) in the context of developing countries. It argues that the so-called universal access policies can be seen as important pieces of broader development strategies. In this sense, there is a strong case for governments of developing countries to foster access to ICTs. The work is structured in three parts. Part I examines the theoretical arguments and empirical evidence supporting the positive impact of access to ICTs on economic growth. Part II discusses the impact of access to ICTs on the improvement of ...


Zoning Exemptions: Granting Immunity To Private Wireless Providers, John R. Nolon, Jessica A. Bacher Apr 2005

Zoning Exemptions: Granting Immunity To Private Wireless Providers, John R. Nolon, Jessica A. Bacher

Elisabeth Haub School of Law Faculty Publications

Contrary to the Telecommunications Act of 1996, the New York Court of Appeals in the Matter of Crown Communication New York, Inc. v. Department of Transportation of the State of New York, City of New Rochelle et al., held that, both private companies who contract with local governments to build towers on public land, and the private companies who build attached antennae to these towers, are immune from local zoning regulations. The court’s decision is due to the public nature and importance of the mass communication these structures will provide. Of particular importance, was public good to be served ...


Universal Service: Problems, Solutions, And Responsive Policies, Allen S. Hammond Iv Mar 2005

Universal Service: Problems, Solutions, And Responsive Policies, Allen S. Hammond Iv

Faculty Publications

Affordable access to telecommunications networks is extremely important to all Americans. The federal universal service policy is critical to ensuring affordable access for low income Americans and those living in rural and high cost areas, and on tribal lands. Consequently the nation’s commitment to preserving universal service has been longstanding and continues to this day.

While reform of the telecommunications universal service policy is clearly warranted, ignoring the impact of IP-enabled intermodal competition is counterproductive. In an era of IP-enabled convergence, ultimately, proposals and policies that solely focus on one technology platform will be less successful. Too often they ...


Sony, Tort Doctrines, And The Puzzle Of Peer-To-Peer, Alfred C. Yen Feb 2005

Sony, Tort Doctrines, And The Puzzle Of Peer-To-Peer, Alfred C. Yen

Boston College Law School Faculty Papers

This Article analyzes and reconstructs the law of third party copyright liability as it applies to providers of peer-to-peer technology. By doing so, the Article accomplishes three things. First, it identifies doctrinal tension between broad third party copyright liability endorsed by lower courts and the Supreme Court’s skepticism of such liability as expressed in Sony Corporation of America v. Universal City Studios. Second, it describes how existing interpretations of the law fail to direct judicial attention to important considerations that ought to influence the third party copyright liability of peer-to-peer providers. Third, it uses concepts borrowed from common law ...


Preemption Of State Spam Laws By The Federal Can-Spam Act, Roger Allen Ford Jan 2005

Preemption Of State Spam Laws By The Federal Can-Spam Act, Roger Allen Ford

Law Faculty Scholarship

Unsolicited bulk commercial email is an increasing problem, and though many states have passed laws aimed at curbing its use and abuse, for several years the federal government took no action. In 2003 that changed when Congress passed the CAN-SPAM Act. Though the law contains many different restrictions on spam messages, including some restriction of nearly every type that states had adopted, the Act was widely criticized as weak. Many of the CAN-SPAM Act's provisions are weaker than corresponding provisions of state law, and the Act preempts most state spam laws that would go farther, including two state laws ...


The Fcc's New Indecency Enforcement Policy And Its European Counterparts: A Cautionary Tale, Michael Botein, Adamski Dariusz Jan 2005

The Fcc's New Indecency Enforcement Policy And Its European Counterparts: A Cautionary Tale, Michael Botein, Adamski Dariusz

Articles & Chapters

No abstract provided.


The Fcc’S New Indecency Enforcement Policy And Its European Counterparts: A Cautionary Tale, Michael Botein, Dariusz Adamski Jan 2005

The Fcc’S New Indecency Enforcement Policy And Its European Counterparts: A Cautionary Tale, Michael Botein, Dariusz Adamski

Articles & Chapters

No abstract provided.


On The Regulation Of Networks As Complex Systems: A Graph Theory Approach, Daniel F. Spulber, Christopher S. Yoo Jan 2005

On The Regulation Of Networks As Complex Systems: A Graph Theory Approach, Daniel F. Spulber, Christopher S. Yoo

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.


Towards A Differentiated Products Theory Of Copyright, Christopher S. Yoo Jan 2005

Towards A Differentiated Products Theory Of Copyright, Christopher S. Yoo

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

The well-known “access-incentives” tradeoff that lies at the heart of the standard economic analysis of copyright follows largely from the assumption that copyright turns authors into monopolists. If one instead analyzes copyright through a framework that allows for product differentiation and entry, the access-incentives tradeoff becomes less significant. By increasing producer appropriability and profit, increased copyright protection can stimulate entry of competitors producing similar works, which in turn results in lower prices, increased product variety, and increased access. This approach would also broaden set of available policy instruments, although disentangling the effects of one from another can be quite complicated.


Architectural Censorship And The Fcc, Christopher S. Yoo Jan 2005

Architectural Censorship And The Fcc, Christopher S. Yoo

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.


Advertising And Intermediaries In Provision Of Legal Services: Bates In Retrospect And Prospect, Geoffrey C. Hazard Jr. Jan 2005

Advertising And Intermediaries In Provision Of Legal Services: Bates In Retrospect And Prospect, Geoffrey C. Hazard Jr.

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.


Playing Hide And Seek: How To Protect Virtual Pornographers And Actual Children On The Internet, Audrey Rogers Jan 2005

Playing Hide And Seek: How To Protect Virtual Pornographers And Actual Children On The Internet, Audrey Rogers

Elisabeth Haub School of Law Faculty Publications

This Article considers the Supreme Court's suggestion and recommends a mechanism to regulate the virtual pornography market in a manner that balances the rights of virtual pornographers with the prosecution of actual child pornographers. Part II traces the events leading up to the Free Speech decision, commencing with the enactment of the Child Pornography Prevention Act of 1996 (CPPA). Part III discusses the Free Speech opinion and the post-Free Speech cases. Part IV examines the PROTECT Act--the legislative response to the Supreme Court's decision. Part V concludes that regulation of the virtual pornography industry is the most effective ...


Talk Show Torts Turn Deaf Ear To Plaintiffs, Joseph A. Tomain Jan 2005

Talk Show Torts Turn Deaf Ear To Plaintiffs, Joseph A. Tomain

Articles by Maurer Faculty

No abstract provided.


Fcc’S Crackdown On Broadcast Indecency, Michael Botein Jan 2005

Fcc’S Crackdown On Broadcast Indecency, Michael Botein

Other Publications

No abstract provided.


Prometheus Radio Project V. Fcc: The Persistence Of Scarcity, Aaron K. Perzanowski Jan 2005

Prometheus Radio Project V. Fcc: The Persistence Of Scarcity, Aaron K. Perzanowski

Faculty Publications

Part I traces the history of broadcast regulation, emphasizing the development of the scarcity doctrine and the subsequent deregulatory trend. Part II examines the FCC's 2003 rule changes and the Third Circuit's analysis of those modifications in Prometheus Radio Project v. FCC. Part III analyzes the assumptions underlying the FCC's proffered explanation for its rule changes, ultimately concluding that they lack justification, and offers suggestions for responsible ownership deregulation. Part IV calls on Congress to reassert itself as the final arbiter of media policy.


The Promise Of Internet Intermediary Liability, Ronald J. Mann, Seth R. Belzley Jan 2005

The Promise Of Internet Intermediary Liability, Ronald J. Mann, Seth R. Belzley

Faculty Scholarship

The Internet has transformed the economics of communication, creating a spirited debate about the proper role of federal, state, and international governments in regulating conduct related to the Internet. Many argue that Internet communications should be entirely self-regulated because such communications cannot or should not be the subject of government regulation. The advocates of that approach would prefer a no-regulation zone around Internet communications, based largely on the unexamined view that Internet activity is fundamentally different in a way that justifies broad regulatory exemption. At the same time, some kinds of activity that the Internet facilitates undisputedly violate widely shared ...


The Ghost Of Telecommunications Past, Philip J. Weiser Jan 2005

The Ghost Of Telecommunications Past, Philip J. Weiser

Articles

Paul Starr's The Creation of the Media presents modern policymakers with an important opportunity to consider the historical lessons of the telecommunications industry. This Book Review underscores how Starr's book richly explains some key components of U.S. information policy - such as relying on an integrated strategy of intellectual property, antitrust law, and telecommunications policy - and that some historical lessons are misplaced as to today's environment - such as a categorical skepticism of vertical integration. Moreover, Starr's account of telecommunications history explains that the U.S.'s success in promoting innovation in the information industries reflects our ...


Policing The Spectrum Commons, Philip J. Weiser, Dale N. Hatfield Jan 2005

Policing The Spectrum Commons, Philip J. Weiser, Dale N. Hatfield

Articles

One of the most contested questions in spectrum policy is whether bands of spectrum left as unlicensed will fall victim to the tragedy of the commons. Advocates of increased unlicensed spectrum often downplay what enforcement measures are necessary to minimize interference and to prevent the tragedy of the commons problem. Even imposing spectrum etiquette requirements in addition to the FCC's equipment certification program will fail to address this concern effectively, as the development of such measures - e.g., the requirement that devices listen before they talk - does not ensure that they will be followed. Indeed, if there are incentives ...


Rewriting The Telecom Act: An Introduction, Philip J. Weiser Jan 2005

Rewriting The Telecom Act: An Introduction, Philip J. Weiser

Articles

No abstract provided.


Lessons From The Nextwave Saga: The Federal Communications Commission, The Courts, And The Use Of Market Forms To Perform Public Functions, Rodger D. Citron, John A. Rogovin Jan 2005

Lessons From The Nextwave Saga: The Federal Communications Commission, The Courts, And The Use Of Market Forms To Perform Public Functions, Rodger D. Citron, John A. Rogovin

Scholarly Works

No abstract provided.


Beyond Cybersquatting: Taking Domain Name Disputes Past Trademark Policy, Jacqueline D. Lipton Jan 2005

Beyond Cybersquatting: Taking Domain Name Disputes Past Trademark Policy, Jacqueline D. Lipton

Articles

All good 'cyberlawyers' know that in the late 1990s, legal and regulatory measures were adopted, both at the domestic and international level to address the then-growing problem of 'cybersquatting': that is, the registration of often multiple domain names corresponding to valuable corporate trademarks with the intention of extorting high prices from the trademark owners for transferring the names to them. Since 1999, the Uniform Domain Name Dispute Resolution Policy ('UDRP') in particular, complemented by the Anti-Cybersquatting Consumer Protection Act ('ACPA'), has been very successful in combating this practice. Unfortunately, since the late 1990s, there has been little movement towards developing ...


Beyond Network Neutrality, Christopher S. Yoo Jan 2005

Beyond Network Neutrality, Christopher S. Yoo

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.