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Series

Business Organizations Law

Law & Economics Working Papers

2013

Articles 1 - 2 of 2

Full-Text Articles in Law

Methods For Multicountry Studies Of Corporate Governance (And Evidence From The Brikt Countries), Bernard S. Black, Antonio Gledson De Carvalho, Vikramaditya Khanna, Woochan Kim, B. Burcin Yurtoglu Mar 2013

Methods For Multicountry Studies Of Corporate Governance (And Evidence From The Brikt Countries), Bernard S. Black, Antonio Gledson De Carvalho, Vikramaditya Khanna, Woochan Kim, B. Burcin Yurtoglu

Law & Economics Working Papers

We discuss the perils in multicountry studies of corporate governance (CG), focusing on emerging markets. The existing studies are massively multicountry studies, which cover many firms across many countries, but rely on the same limited governance elements in each countries, have few firm-level control variables, and use pure-cross-sectional data. This paper discusses the severe data and construct validity issues in these studies, proposes methods to respond to those issues, and applies those methods through a study of five major emerging markets (Brazil, India, Korea, Russia, and Turkey). We develop unique time-series datasets on governance in each country. We address construct …


'Quack Corporate Governance' As Traditional Chinese Medicine – The Securities Regulation Cannibalization Of China's Corporate Law And A State Regulator's Battle Against State Political Economic Power, Nicholas C. Howson Jan 2013

'Quack Corporate Governance' As Traditional Chinese Medicine – The Securities Regulation Cannibalization Of China's Corporate Law And A State Regulator's Battle Against State Political Economic Power, Nicholas C. Howson

Law & Economics Working Papers

From the start of the PRC’s “corporatization” project in the late 1980s, a Chinese corporate governance regime subject to increasingly enabling legal norms has been determined by mandatory regulations imposed by the PRC securities regulator, the CSRC. Indeed, the Chinese corporate law system has been cannibalized by allencompassing securities regulation directed at corporate governance, at least for companies with listed stock. This article traces the path of that sustained intervention, and makes a case – wholly contrary to the “quack corporate governance” critique much aired in the U.S. – that for the PRC this phenomenon is necessary and appropriate, and …