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Full-Text Articles in Law

Business Insolvency And The Irish Debt Crisis, Paul B. Lewis Sep 2016

Business Insolvency And The Irish Debt Crisis, Paul B. Lewis

Paul Lewis

No abstract provided.


Debt-Buyer Lawsuits And Inaccurate Data, Peter A. Holland Mar 2014

Debt-Buyer Lawsuits And Inaccurate Data, Peter A. Holland

Peter A. Holland

Pursuant to secret purchase and sale agreements (also known as forward flow agreements), the accounts that banks sell to debt buyers are often sold “as is,” with explicit and emphatic disclaimers that the debts may not be owed, the amounts claimed may not be accurate, and documentation may be missing. Despite their full knowledge that the accuracy and completeness of the data has been specifically disclaimed by the bank, when they sue consumers, debt buyers tell courts that the information obtained from the bank is inherently reliable and accurate. In order to avoid a fraud on the courts, the contents …


Hidden In Plain View: The Pension Shield Against Creditors, Patricia E. Dilley Jun 2013

Hidden In Plain View: The Pension Shield Against Creditors, Patricia E. Dilley

Patricia E Dilley

No abstract provided.


Bankruptcy And The Myth Of "Uniform Laws", Daniel Austin May 2012

Bankruptcy And The Myth Of "Uniform Laws", Daniel Austin

Daniel A. Austin

The Bankruptcy Clause of the Constitution empowers Congress to enact “uniform Laws on the subject of bankruptcies.” Common definitions of the word uniform include “always the same” and “not variable.” Yet the rights and remedies of debtors and creditors in a bankruptcy case vary significantly depending upon the state and federal jurisdiction in which the case is filed. Rather than a single uniform law of bankruptcy, the U.S. has multiple bankruptcy laws and regimes based upon geography.

The cause of bankruptcy nonuniformity lies in the structure of our bankruptcy system. Many sections of the Bankruptcy Code incorporate state law, which …


State Laws, Court Splits, Local Practice Make Consumer Bankruptcy Anything But "Uniform", Daniel Austin Dec 2010

State Laws, Court Splits, Local Practice Make Consumer Bankruptcy Anything But "Uniform", Daniel Austin

Daniel A. Austin

The Bankruptcy Clause allows Congress to establish “uniform Laws on the subject of Bankruptcies throughout the United States.” Pursuant to this authority, the Bankruptcy Code, 11 U.S.C. §101 et seq., governs consumer bankruptcy in the U.S. As a federal statute, it might be expected that the Code would be applied in a relatively uniform manner throughout the U.S. However, state laws, judicial interpretation, and local practice can vary so significantly, that the relief and procedures available to a debtor in one state can be entirely different from what is available in another state.