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Full-Text Articles in Law

Building A Culture Of Scholarship With New Clinical Teachers By Writing About Social Justice Lawyering, Susan Bennett, Binny Miller, Michelle Assad, Maria Dooner, Mariam Hinds, Jessica Millward, Citlalli Ochoa, Charles Ross, Anne Schaufele, Caroline Wick Jan 2023

Building A Culture Of Scholarship With New Clinical Teachers By Writing About Social Justice Lawyering, Susan Bennett, Binny Miller, Michelle Assad, Maria Dooner, Mariam Hinds, Jessica Millward, Citlalli Ochoa, Charles Ross, Anne Schaufele, Caroline Wick

American University Journal of Gender, Social Policy & the Law

This Article is a collection of essays about teaching social justice lawyering, as seen through the eyes of eight practitioners-in-residence in the clinical program at American University’s Washington College of Law (“WCL”). They include: Michelle Assad, Maria Dooner, Mariam Hinds, Jessica Millward, Citlalli Ochoa, Charles Ross, Anne Schaufele, and Caroline Wick. They teach in seven clinics, including the Civil Advocacy Clinic, the Criminal Justice Clinic, the Community Economic and Equity Development Clinic, the Disability Rights Law Clinic, the Immigrant Justice Clinic, the International Human Rights Law Clinic, and the Janet R. Spragens Federal Income Tax Clinic. We use the terms …


Arkansas Law Review's 75th Anniversary Remarks, Steve Caple, Erron Smith Apr 2022

Arkansas Law Review's 75th Anniversary Remarks, Steve Caple, Erron Smith

Arkansas Law Review

It is an exciting time for the Arkansas Law Review, the School of Law, and the University of Arkansas. The journal is celebrating its 75th anniversary, the law school is approaching its 100th year of existence, and the university recently celebrated its 150th birthday.


The Writing’S On The Wall: Using Multimedia Presentation Principles From The Museum World To Improve Law School Pedagogy, Cecilia A. Silver Jan 2022

The Writing’S On The Wall: Using Multimedia Presentation Principles From The Museum World To Improve Law School Pedagogy, Cecilia A. Silver

Dickinson Law Review (2017-Present)

Law school pedagogy is a relic. Nearly 150 years after Christopher Langdell pioneered the case method, the typical doctrinal course remains predominantly a verbal domain, featuring lectures, Socratic dialogue, and final exams. But the visual disconnect between legal education and legal practice does students a disservice. Under the proliferating influence of laptops, iPads, smartphones, and Zoom, students now read, work, and study electronically more than they ever have before. So instead of business as usual, it’s time to embrace “visualization”—using multimedia to enhance, or even supplant, the near-exclusive reliance on language—to build a more vibrant and inclusive learning environment.

Law …


Research Across The Curriculum: Using Cognitive Science To Answer The Call For Better Legal Research Instruction, Tenielle Fordyce-Ruff Oct 2020

Research Across The Curriculum: Using Cognitive Science To Answer The Call For Better Legal Research Instruction, Tenielle Fordyce-Ruff

Dickinson Law Review (2017-Present)

The American Bar Association (ABA), law students, and employers are demanding that law schools do better when teaching legal research. Academic critics are demanding that law professors begin to apply the lessons from the science of learning to improve student outcomes. The practice of law is changing.

Yet, the data shows that law schools are not changing their legal research curriculum to respond to the need of their students or to address the ABA’s mandate. This stagnation comes at the same time as an explosion in legal information and a decrease in technical research skills among incoming students. This article …


The Drive To Advise: A Study Of Law Students At A Pro Bono Brief Advice Project, Linda F. Smith Apr 2020

The Drive To Advise: A Study Of Law Students At A Pro Bono Brief Advice Project, Linda F. Smith

St. Mary's Law Journal

Abstract forthcoming.


Connecting Prospective Law Students' Goals To The Competencies That Clients And Legal Employers Need To Achieve More Competent Graduates And Stronger Applicant Pools And Employment Outcomes, Neil W. Hamilton Aug 2019

Connecting Prospective Law Students' Goals To The Competencies That Clients And Legal Employers Need To Achieve More Competent Graduates And Stronger Applicant Pools And Employment Outcomes, Neil W. Hamilton

St. Mary's Journal on Legal Malpractice & Ethics

The author’s chapters in the 2018 professional responsibility hornbook, Legal Ethics, Professional Responsibility, and the Legal Profession, discuss the new data available to help law faculties and students understand the competencies that clients and legal employers want. The foundation for many of these competencies—like ownership over continuous professional development and the relational competencies with clients and teams—is the student’s professional identity or moral core. But students need help to understand these connections.

We have seen some very useful new data over the last few months that will help build bridges among the three major stakeholders in legal education: the …


Digital Pro Bono: Leveraging Technology To Provide Access To Justice, Kathleen Elliott Vinson, Samantha A. Moppett Feb 2019

Digital Pro Bono: Leveraging Technology To Provide Access To Justice, Kathleen Elliott Vinson, Samantha A. Moppett

St. John's Law Review

(Excerpt)

Part I of this Article explores the United States justice system’s failure to adequately serve all people irrespective of wealth and position. Next, Part II discusses the ABA’s call to leverage technology to increase access to justice. Part III explores ABA Free Legal Answers Online, the program that the ABA pioneered to help confront the justice gap in the United States. Subsequently, Part IV illustrates how law schools can leverage technology to increase access to justice for low-income communities while providing pro bono opportunities for attorneys and students in their state. This Part highlights Massachusetts as an example of …


Fake News, Alternative Facts, And Disinformation: The Importance Of Teaching Media Literacy To Law Students, Marin Dell Jan 2019

Fake News, Alternative Facts, And Disinformation: The Importance Of Teaching Media Literacy To Law Students, Marin Dell

Touro Law Review

No abstract provided.


De-Grading Assessment: Rejecting Rubrics In Favor Of Authentic Analysis, Deborah L. Borman Jun 2018

De-Grading Assessment: Rejecting Rubrics In Favor Of Authentic Analysis, Deborah L. Borman

Seattle University Law Review

Assigning grades is the least joyful duty of the law professor. In the current climate of legal education, law professors struggle with issues such as increased class size, providing “practice-ready” graduates, streamlining assignments, and accountability in assessment. In an effort to ease the burden of grading written legal analyses, individual professors or law school writing programs or both may develop articulated rubrics to assess students’ written work. Rubrics are classification tools that allow us to articulate our judgment of a written work. Rubrics may be as extensive as twenty categories and subcategories or may be limited to only a few …


“The Lost Lawyer” Regained: The Abiding Values Of The Legal Profession, Robert Maccrate Oct 2017

“The Lost Lawyer” Regained: The Abiding Values Of The Legal Profession, Robert Maccrate

Dickinson Law Review (2017-Present)

No abstract provided.


Finding Purpose: Perspective From A "Non-Elite" Journal, Jonathan F. Will Jan 2017

Finding Purpose: Perspective From A "Non-Elite" Journal, Jonathan F. Will

Touro Law Review

No abstract provided.


"I See And I Remember; I Do And Understand": Teaching Fundamental Structure In Legal Writing Through The Use Of Samples, Judith B. Tracy Dec 2014

"I See And I Remember; I Do And Understand": Teaching Fundamental Structure In Legal Writing Through The Use Of Samples, Judith B. Tracy

Touro Law Review

No abstract provided.


Increased Importance Of Legal Writing In The Era Of “The Vanishing Trial”, Edward D. Re Dec 2014

Increased Importance Of Legal Writing In The Era Of “The Vanishing Trial”, Edward D. Re

Touro Law Review

No abstract provided.


A Promising Beginning, Jeremiah A. Ho Apr 2014

A Promising Beginning, Jeremiah A. Ho

University of Massachusetts Law Review

When I began teaching at the University of Massachusetts in August 2012, one of my first encounters was with the newly-formed UMass Law Review. The editorial staff was wrapping up its initial preparations for publishing the inaugural volume. Now, over a year later, those nascent processes have since been refined; the inaugural year is over. We are excited to say that the UMass Law Review enters its sophomore year with this current issue, affectionately dubbed “9:1”.


Cat, Cause, And Kant, Richard J. Peltz-Steele Mar 2014

Cat, Cause, And Kant, Richard J. Peltz-Steele

University of Massachusetts Law Review

These are precarious times in which to launch a new law school and a new law review. Yet here we are. The University of Massachusetts is now in its first year of operation with provisional ABA accreditation. This text is a foreword to the first general-interest issue of the University of Massachusetts Law Review. Now marks an appropriate time to take stock of what these institutions mean to accomplish in our unsettled legal world.


Legal Education’S Perfect Storm: Law Students’ Poor Writing And Legal Analysis Skills Collide With Dismal Employment Prospects, Creating The Urgent Need To Reconfigure The First-Year Curriculum, James Etienne Viator Jan 2012

Legal Education’S Perfect Storm: Law Students’ Poor Writing And Legal Analysis Skills Collide With Dismal Employment Prospects, Creating The Urgent Need To Reconfigure The First-Year Curriculum, James Etienne Viator

Catholic University Law Review

No abstract provided.


True North: Navigating For The Transfer Of Learning In Legal Education, Tonya Kowalski Aug 2010

True North: Navigating For The Transfer Of Learning In Legal Education, Tonya Kowalski

Seattle University Law Review

As lifelong learners, we all know the feelings of discomfort and bewilderment that can come from being asked to apply existing skills in a completely new situation. As legal educators, we have also experienced the frustration that comes from watching our students struggle to identify and transfer skills from one learning environment to another. For example, a first-semester law student who learns to analogize case law to a fact pattern in a legal writing problem typically will not see the deeper applications for those skills in a law school essay exam several weeks later. Similarly, when law students learn how …


Advocating For Our Future, Sarah J. Mirsky Jan 2009

Advocating For Our Future, Sarah J. Mirsky

NYLS Law Review

No abstract provided.


Researching Across The Curriculum: The Road Must Continue Beyond The First Year, Brooke J. Bowman Jan 2008

Researching Across The Curriculum: The Road Must Continue Beyond The First Year, Brooke J. Bowman

Oklahoma Law Review

No abstract provided.


Features: Taking Globalization Seriously: Michigan Breaks New Ground By Requiring The Study Of Transnational Law, Mathias Reimann Jan 2003

Features: Taking Globalization Seriously: Michigan Breaks New Ground By Requiring The Study Of Transnational Law, Mathias Reimann

Law Quadrangle (formerly Law Quad Notes)

Taking globalization seriously: Michigan breaks new ground by requiring the study of transnational law. The faculty acted on the conviction that a fundamental understanding of how law works in the global context must be part of every lawyer's toolkit.


A Computer-Assisted Legal Research And Writing Course, Jocelyn Downie, Michael Deturbide, Laura Fraser Oct 1998

A Computer-Assisted Legal Research And Writing Course, Jocelyn Downie, Michael Deturbide, Laura Fraser

Dalhousie Law Journal

In this paper, the authors describe and assess their experience with the use of WebCT (a computer program that facilitates the creation and management of courses using the Internet) in the Dalhousie Legal Research and Writing Program. They explain what WebCT is, why they decided to use it, and how they used it. They assess its inaugural use and conclude that, despite some difficulties, the pilot project was a success and WebCT can be a useful tool for other teachers of legal research and writing.


Legal Research In A Social Science Setting: The Problem Of Method, T Brettel Dawson May 1992

Legal Research In A Social Science Setting: The Problem Of Method, T Brettel Dawson

Dalhousie Law Journal

As part of its ongoing process of curriculum development, the Department of Law at Carleton University decided in 1988 that a compulsory course in legal research methods was long overdue in the B.A. Honours degree in Law. Fortified with interest nurtured by methodological debates in feminist scholarship,' experience devilling' for a barrister pending my call to the bar, and practice from instructing a course in legal research and writing while a graduate student, I set about developing the proposed course. No guidelines existed for such a course, beyond the logic that it should complement the socio-legal or legal studies focus …


Research In A Changing World Of Law And Technology, Morris L. Cohen May 1990

Research In A Changing World Of Law And Technology, Morris L. Cohen

Dalhousie Law Journal

As a long-time friend and admirer of legal education at Dalhousie, it is an honor and a pleasure for me to offer the Read lecture this year. It is particularly warming to have Mrs. Read and the next two generations of Reads here today, since Dean Read was the strongest proponent of the law library's development during his deanship here. One of the designated topics for these lectures has been legal education. With the dedication of the addition to the Weldon Building housing the restored Sir James Dunn Law Library, and the designation of a librarian, for the first time, …


The Public Dimension In Legal Education, Mark R. Macguigan Apr 1989

The Public Dimension In Legal Education, Mark R. Macguigan

Dalhousie Law Journal

Legal education, while always a subject of fascination to law students and professors, only periodically becomes a matter of more general interest. But that is what I believe has happened in Canada in the mid-1980s as the result of three publishing events.


On Reasons For Decanal Disenchantment And Their Wider Implications, Theodore J. St. Antoine Jan 1976

On Reasons For Decanal Disenchantment And Their Wider Implications, Theodore J. St. Antoine

Law Quadrangle (formerly Law Quad Notes)

Based on the Dean's Report to the President of the University for the Year 1974-75


On The State Of "The Word", Francis A. Allen Jan 1976

On The State Of "The Word", Francis A. Allen

Law Quadrangle (formerly Law Quad Notes)

Based on Professo Allen's comments at the dedication of the Baron de Hirsch Meyer Library Addition, University of Miami Law School, Coral Gables, Fla., December 17, 1975.


The Clinical Law Experiment: Michigan's First Five Years, Steven D. Pepe Jan 1975

The Clinical Law Experiment: Michigan's First Five Years, Steven D. Pepe

Law Quadrangle (formerly Law Quad Notes)

Many Michigan law alumni continue to inquire about the Clinical Law Program, now entering its fifth year of fulltime operation. Prof. Al Conard's "Letter from the Law Clinic" in the fall, 1973, Law Quadrangle Notes gave a perceptive and entertaining glimpse into some of the case situations at the clinic and the types of learning in which clinic students are engaged. This article will sketch the development and operation of our clinical experiment in legal education. A future article will explore the goals, methodology, and problems of clinical legal education. A third and final article will focus on a particular …


Comparative Legal Research, Some Remarks On "Looking Out Of The Cave", Hessel E. Yntema May 1956

Comparative Legal Research, Some Remarks On "Looking Out Of The Cave", Hessel E. Yntema

Michigan Law Review

Despite this risk and without limiting discussion of comparative legal research to a Platonic theory of knowledge-to which I for one would not accede-the text prompts first the inquiry, unavoidable in a constructive discussion of the matter, whether contemporary legal study in the United States is concerned with shadows in an intellectual cave-or in other words, whether it is true, as I was told years ago, partly perhaps in jest, by a late distinguished member of the Supreme Court, then Attorney General, when, encountering me on a visit to the Department of Justice, he kindly asked what I was looking …