Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Law Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Journal

Legal Profession

2017

Institution
Keyword
Publication

Articles 1 - 30 of 151

Full-Text Articles in Law

More Of The Same: Elitism And Exclusion At The Aals Annual Meeting, David E. Steinberg Dec 2017

More Of The Same: Elitism And Exclusion At The Aals Annual Meeting, David E. Steinberg

Maine Law Review

At the Association of American Law Schools (AALS) meetings and in materials published by the Association, probably no one word appears more frequently than “diversity.” For example, the theme of the 2000 AALS Annual Meeting was A Recommitment to Diversity. In a 1986 essay titled Collegial Diversity, AALS President Susan Westerberg Prager wrote: “The different perspectives of our colleagues can illuminate other areas of research to give us new classroom direction.” And, in a 1996 statement on diversity adopted by the AALS Executive Committee, the committee stated that an objective of diversity was “to create an educational community—and ultimately a …


Artificial Intelligence: Application Today And Implications Tomorrow, Sean Semmler, Zeeve Rose Dec 2017

Artificial Intelligence: Application Today And Implications Tomorrow, Sean Semmler, Zeeve Rose

Duke Law & Technology Review

This paper analyzes the applications of artificial intelligence to the legal industry, specifically in the fields of legal research and contract drafting. First, it will look at the implications of artificial intelligence (A.I.) for the current practice of law. Second, it will delve into the future implications of A.I. on law firms and the possible regulatory challenges that come with A.I. The proliferation of A.I. in the legal sphere will give laymen (clients) access to the information and services traditionally provided exclusively by attorneys. With an increase in access to these services will come a change in the role that …


Ethics, Law Firms, And Legal Education, Milton C. Regan Jr. Dec 2017

Ethics, Law Firms, And Legal Education, Milton C. Regan Jr.

Maine Law Review

A rash of recent corporate scandals has once again put professional ethics in the spotlight. It's hard to pick up the Wall Street Journal each day and not read that authorities have launched a new investigation or that additional indictments are imminent. Stories of financial fraud and outright looting have galvanized the public and shaken the economy. What ethical lessons can we draw from these events? Two explanations seem especially prominent. The first is a story of individuals without an adequate moral compass. Some people's greed and ambition were unchecked by any internal ethical constraints. For such deviants, no amount …


The Lawyer As A Public Citizen, Cruz Reynoso Dec 2017

The Lawyer As A Public Citizen, Cruz Reynoso

Maine Law Review

The Eleventh Annual Frank M. Coffin Lecture on Law and Public Service was held on October 17, 2002. Cruz Reynoso, Boochever and Bird Professor of Law at the University of California at Davis, School of Law and retired Associate Justice of the California Supreme Court, delivered the lecture. Established in 1992, the lecture honors Judge Frank M. Coffin, Senior Circuit Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the First Circuit, an inspiration, mentor, and friend to the University of Maine School of Law. The Board and Staff of Volume 55 are honored to continue the tradition of publishing …


Turns Of The Contingent Fee Key To The Courthouse Door, Douglas R. Richmond Dec 2017

Turns Of The Contingent Fee Key To The Courthouse Door, Douglas R. Richmond

Buffalo Law Review

No abstract provided.


Strengthening Democracy: The Challenge Of Public Interest Law, Scott Harshbarger Nov 2017

Strengthening Democracy: The Challenge Of Public Interest Law, Scott Harshbarger

Maine Law Review

The Twelfth Annual Frank M. Coffin Lecture on Law and Public Service was held in the fall of 2003. Scott Harshbarger, former President of Common Cause and Massachusetts Attorney General, delivered the lecture. Established in 1992, the lecture honors Judge Frank M. Coffin, Senior Circuit Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the First Circuit, an inspiration, mentor, and friend to the University of Maine School of Law.


Some Reflections On Dissenting, Kermit V. Lipez Nov 2017

Some Reflections On Dissenting, Kermit V. Lipez

Maine Law Review

In the collegial world of appellate judging, where the dominant impulse is consensus, dissents depart from the norm. If their language is sharp, the dissents may offend colleagues and worry court watchers who expect consensus. These self-assigned opinions also add to the pressures of the work. Given these implications, the choice to dissent should never be a casual one. You must weigh the institutional and personal costs and benefits, understand the purpose of the dissent and the audiences for it, and always be attentive to style and tone. In a haphazard sort of way, I consider these issues when I …


Faith, Pluralism, And The Practice Of Law, Robert K. Vischer Nov 2017

Faith, Pluralism, And The Practice Of Law, Robert K. Vischer

The Catholic Lawyer

No abstract provided.


Catholic Lawyers In An Age Of Secularism, The Honorable Diarmuid F. O'Scannlain Nov 2017

Catholic Lawyers In An Age Of Secularism, The Honorable Diarmuid F. O'Scannlain

The Catholic Lawyer

No abstract provided.


Nevertheless She Persisted: From Mrs. Bradwell To Annalise Keating, Gender Bias In The Courtroom, Chris Chambers Goodman Nov 2017

Nevertheless She Persisted: From Mrs. Bradwell To Annalise Keating, Gender Bias In The Courtroom, Chris Chambers Goodman

William & Mary Journal of Race, Gender, and Social Justice

No abstract provided.


The Changing Legal Landscape For Clergy, Arthur Gross Schaefer, Dan Van Bogaert Nov 2017

The Changing Legal Landscape For Clergy, Arthur Gross Schaefer, Dan Van Bogaert

The Catholic Lawyer

No abstract provided.


Tilt, Steven Lubert Nov 2017

Tilt, Steven Lubert

Maine Law Review

In poker, everybody loses sooner or later. Sometimes it’s just a few hands, and sometimes you lose for the whole night (or longer). Sometimes the losses are your own fault, and sometimes you can play perfectly and still go broke. The point is that losing is part of the game. No one is immune from it, and even the most skilled players cannot avoid it. In the long run, of course, there is no luck in poker, and the best players will eventually win. But as the card player and poet A. Alvarez explained, there is plenty of luck, both …


Preface: Annual Survey 2017, Brian M. Melnyk Nov 2017

Preface: Annual Survey 2017, Brian M. Melnyk

University of Richmond Law Review

No abstract provided.


Personal Values Within Our Profession, Gordon L. Gray Oct 2017

Personal Values Within Our Profession, Gordon L. Gray

The Catholic Lawyer

No abstract provided.


Jacob's Blessing, Cooperative Grace, And Practicing Law With A Limp, John M.A. Dipippa Oct 2017

Jacob's Blessing, Cooperative Grace, And Practicing Law With A Limp, John M.A. Dipippa

The Catholic Lawyer

No abstract provided.


Learning From The Unpleasant Truths Of Interfaith Conversation: William Stringfellow's Lessons For The Jewish Lawyer, Russell G. Pearce Oct 2017

Learning From The Unpleasant Truths Of Interfaith Conversation: William Stringfellow's Lessons For The Jewish Lawyer, Russell G. Pearce

The Catholic Lawyer

No abstract provided.


A Challenge To Lawyers, Robert F. Drinan, S.J. Oct 2017

A Challenge To Lawyers, Robert F. Drinan, S.J.

The Catholic Lawyer

No abstract provided.


Introductory Note: Personal Values And The Character Of The Lawyer, Joseph A. Morris, C.M., Ph.D Oct 2017

Introductory Note: Personal Values And The Character Of The Lawyer, Joseph A. Morris, C.M., Ph.D

The Catholic Lawyer

No abstract provided.


On Encouraging Lawyers To Serve The Poor, John F. Castellano Oct 2017

On Encouraging Lawyers To Serve The Poor, John F. Castellano

The Catholic Lawyer

No abstract provided.


Women In The Legal Profession From The 1920s To The 1970s: What Can We Learn From Their Experience About Law And Social Change?, Cynthia Grant Bowman Oct 2017

Women In The Legal Profession From The 1920s To The 1970s: What Can We Learn From Their Experience About Law And Social Change?, Cynthia Grant Bowman

Maine Law Review

I work in a law school building that is named for Jane M.G. Foster, who donated the money for its construction. It’s a lovely building, and my office overlooks a gorge so that I can hear the water fall as I write. So I’m grateful to Jane Foster. And curious. Who was she? Jane Foster graduated from Cornell Law School in 1918, having served as an editor of the law review and being elected to the Order of the Coif. But no law firm wanted her services. She obtained employment not as a lawyer but as a legal assistant in …


Honey, You're No June Cleaver: The Power Of "Dropping Pop" To Persuade, Victoria S. Salzmann Oct 2017

Honey, You're No June Cleaver: The Power Of "Dropping Pop" To Persuade, Victoria S. Salzmann

Maine Law Review

Imagine a contentious child-custody hearing in which the husband is testifying about his wife's behavior. If he were to state “she is no June Cleaver,” that testimony would have an immediate impact upon those present. Most people would understand that the husband was making a reference to Mrs. Ward Cleaver, the pearl-clad mother figure from the popular 1950s television show Leave It to Beaver. However, the reference does more than simply call to mind 1950s television. It is a vivid popular-culture allusion that immediately taps into the psyche of anyone familiar with the show. It tells the listener that the …


The Shifting Frontiers Of Law: Access To Justice And Underemployment In The Legal Profession, Nandini Ramanujam, Alexander Agnello Oct 2017

The Shifting Frontiers Of Law: Access To Justice And Underemployment In The Legal Profession, Nandini Ramanujam, Alexander Agnello

Osgoode Hall Law Journal

The article examines two interrelated issues attracting attention from the legal academy, the profession, and policy makers: i) the crisis of access to justice among ordinary Canadians, and ii) the increasing number of qualified and underemployed lawyers. This article sets out to understand the interrelated factors underlying these two trends, and explores long-term, accessible solutions to address the misalignment between the supply of underemployed law graduates and a demand for affordable legal services. In response to these twin problems, we examine how legislative reform, open source networks, and the automation of legal work can allow lawyers to create more cost-effective …


A Long Overdue Rendezvous For American Legal Education, Daniel J. Morrissey Oct 2017

A Long Overdue Rendezvous For American Legal Education, Daniel J. Morrissey

The Catholic Lawyer

No abstract provided.


Reflections On Forty Years Of Private Practice And Sustained Pro Bono Advocacy, Stephen H. Oleskey Oct 2017

Reflections On Forty Years Of Private Practice And Sustained Pro Bono Advocacy, Stephen H. Oleskey

Maine Law Review

I am going to address two topics. The first is the one Judge Coffin asked me to address in October 2009, when I was invited to give the 2010 Coffin Lecture: how to combine the private practice of law with an active pro bono practice. The second topic is the one Dean Peter Pitegoff and I agreed to add: a brief discussion of legal developments in national security law since 9/11. My pro bono involvement in Guantanamo Habeas litigation began in 2004 and led directly to my interest in national security law and to my recognition of how difficult it …


The Multi-Purpose Attorney: The Interpreting Attorney-Mediator, Catherine Gramajo Oct 2017

The Multi-Purpose Attorney: The Interpreting Attorney-Mediator, Catherine Gramajo

Pepperdine Dispute Resolution Law Journal

The attorney-mediator may be a beneficial hybrid, but what happens when another layer is added to the attorney's functions? Specifically, what happens when the attorney takes on the role of both mediator and interpreter? Part I will provide a brief overview of the increasing role of attorneys as mediators, as well as an overview of the guidelines for mediators and interpreters. Part II examines the importance of language and culture in mediation, particularly focusing on the vital function of the interpreter in the United States. Given the variety of languages spoken in the United States, interpreters are becoming an essential …


Reforming Recusal Rules: Reassessing The Presumption Of Judicial Impartiality In Light Of The Realities Of Judging And Changing The Substance Of Disqualification Standards To Eliminate Cognitive Errors, Melinda A. Marbes Oct 2017

Reforming Recusal Rules: Reassessing The Presumption Of Judicial Impartiality In Light Of The Realities Of Judging And Changing The Substance Of Disqualification Standards To Eliminate Cognitive Errors, Melinda A. Marbes

St. Mary's Journal on Legal Malpractice & Ethics

In recent years, high profile disqualification disputes have caught the attention of the public. In each instance there has been an outcry when a presiding jurist was asked to recuse but declined. Unfortunately, even if the jurist explains his refusal to recuse, the reasons given often are unsatisfying and do little to quell suspicions of bias. Instead, litigants, the press, and the public question whether the jurist actually is unbiased and doubt the impartiality of the judiciary as a whole. This negative reaction to refusals to recuse is caused, at least in part, by politically charged circumstances that cause further …


Alternative Business Structures: Good For The Public, Good For The Lawyers, Jayne R. Reardon Oct 2017

Alternative Business Structures: Good For The Public, Good For The Lawyers, Jayne R. Reardon

St. Mary's Journal on Legal Malpractice & Ethics

There has been a shift in consumer behavior over the last several decades. To keep up with the transforming consumer, many professions have changed the way they do business. Yet lawyers continue to deliver services the way they have since the founding of our country. Bar associations and legal ethicists have long debated the idea of allowing lawyers to practice in “alternative business structures,” where lawyers and nonlawyers can co-own and co-manage a business to deliver legal services. This Article argues these types of businesses inhibit lawyers’ ability to provide better legal services to the public and that the legal …


Ethics And The “Root Of All Evil” In Nineteenth Century American Law Practice, Michael Hoeflich Oct 2017

Ethics And The “Root Of All Evil” In Nineteenth Century American Law Practice, Michael Hoeflich

St. Mary's Journal on Legal Malpractice & Ethics

This Article discusses the bifurcated notions on the purpose of working as an attorney—whether the purpose is to attain wealth or whether the work in and of itself is the purpose. This Article explores the sentiments held by distinguished and influential nineteenth-century lawyers—particularly David Hoffman and George Sharswood—regarding the legal ethics surrounding attorney’s fees and how money in general is the root of many ethical dilemmas within the arena of legal practice. Through the texts of Hoffman and Sharswood, we find the origins of the ethical rules all American attorneys are subject to in their various jurisdictions.


The Ambulance Chasing Epidemic In Texas, Ronald Rodriguez Oct 2017

The Ambulance Chasing Epidemic In Texas, Ronald Rodriguez

St. Mary's Journal on Legal Malpractice & Ethics

Barratry and solicitation of professional employment is illegal and unethical. The Texas Disciplinary Rules of Professional Conduct define barratry as ethical misconduct and a serious crime. Unfortunately, for citizens and law-abiding attorneys of Texas, the criminal and ethical prohibitions against barratry have rarely been enforced. Consequently, barratry continues to proliferate rapidly throughout South Texas. For lawyers who engage in this unethical practice, the potential for large financial gain proves irresistible given the virtually nonexistent risk of prosecution. The lack of robust and successful prosecutions has created an optimal environment for barratry to proliferate. This Article discusses the current barratry epidemic …


Electronic Social Media: Friend Or Foe For Judges, M. Sue Kurita Oct 2017

Electronic Social Media: Friend Or Foe For Judges, M. Sue Kurita

St. Mary's Journal on Legal Malpractice & Ethics

The use of electronic social communication has grown at a phenomenal rate. Facebook, the most popular social networking website, has over 1,968,000,000 users—a number that has exponentially grown since its inception in 2004. The number of judges accessing and using electronic social media (ESM) has also increased. However, unlike the general population, judges must consider constitutional, ethical, technical, and evidentiary implications when they use and access ESM. The First Amendment forbids “abridging the freedom of speech” and protects the expression of personal ideas, positions, and views. However, the American Bar Association’s Model Code of Judicial Conduct and the Texas Code …