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University of the District of Columbia Law Review

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Adding Wage Theft As A Qualifying Crime In The U Visa Certification, Genesis Aguirre Guerra May 2023

Adding Wage Theft As A Qualifying Crime In The U Visa Certification, Genesis Aguirre Guerra

University of the District of Columbia Law Review

Jose Lopez1 migrated to the United States without proper documentation. After he arrived, Mr. Lopez had several consecutive jobs as a line cook in various restaurants in Reno, Nevada. He started working at Casino restaurant. One day, Mr. Lopez noticed that his paychecks had not been reflecting the overtime hours he worked. Mr. Lopez approached his employer about his pay discrepancy. His employer told Mr. Lopez that he would pay for overtime the following week. The following week came, and the employer did not pay Mr. Lopez for his overtime hours. This continued for several weeks. Mr. Lopez confronted his …


Justice Ginsburg's Journey To Dissents And Influence On Reproductive Rights, Songo Wawa May 2023

Justice Ginsburg's Journey To Dissents And Influence On Reproductive Rights, Songo Wawa

University of the District of Columbia Law Review

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s advocacy for gender equity, evidenced by her nationally famous dissents, began long before her 27 years on the Supreme Court. Prior to becoming a Supreme Court Justice, Attorney Ginsburg’s early experiences of gender inequity led to her advocacy for women’s rights as a law professor and as co-founder of the American Civil Liberties Union’s Women’s Rights Project. 1 Attorney Ginsburg’s legal strategy encompassed her pragmatic approach to voicing her opinions about gender equality. 2 In Gonzales v. Carhart, both her dissent announcement and written dissent demonstrated Justice Ginsburg’s commitment to women’s reproductive autonomy.3 Without Justice Ginsburg’s …


Housing Hipsters: Adapting The Spirit Of Hipster Antitrust To Address Wealth Asymmetries Between Corporate Residential Properties And Cost-Burdened Residents, Beth Brodsky May 2023

Housing Hipsters: Adapting The Spirit Of Hipster Antitrust To Address Wealth Asymmetries Between Corporate Residential Properties And Cost-Burdened Residents, Beth Brodsky

University of the District of Columbia Law Review

Sean Gotcher, a real estate agent for 11 years, went viral on TikTok with a real estate hypothetical.1 Gotcher asked how weird society would be if a billion-dollar company collected data on what people would be willing to pay for housing by zip code and then use that information to buy under the market-rate in order to sell above the market rate.2 He wondered how weird it would be if this company bought 31 homes in a two-mile radius to sell for a profit of $1.2 million within a year.3 Zillow inspired this scenario. 4 After Gotcher’s TikTok video received …


The Equal Rights Amendment And The Equality Act: Closing Gaps Post-Bostock For Sexual Orientation And Gender Identity Minorities, Sarah Blazucki May 2023

The Equal Rights Amendment And The Equality Act: Closing Gaps Post-Bostock For Sexual Orientation And Gender Identity Minorities, Sarah Blazucki

University of the District of Columbia Law Review

In 2020, the Supreme Court held in Bostock v. Clayton County that the “because of sex” protection in Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (Title VII) included an individual’s “homosexual and transgender status.”1 This landmark decision expanded employment protections under the law, for the first time providing broad federal protections to sexual orientation and gender identity minorities.2 It was a sweeping decision, granting protections to millions of people.3 Yet many worry the protections are incomplete, for several reasons. First, the Court explicitly used the language “homosexual and transgender,”4 potentially leaving unresolved if other minority sexual orientations and …


Options For Youth With Disabilities: A Focus On Competitive Integrated Employment Limits, Tatyana Safronova May 2023

Options For Youth With Disabilities: A Focus On Competitive Integrated Employment Limits, Tatyana Safronova

University of the District of Columbia Law Review

For people with disabilities, employment outcomes are discouraging. In 2021, only 19% were employed, a third of the employment rate for people without disabilities.1 Disabled individuals worked part-time because they could not find full-time work or because of a reduction in hours. 2 Fewer disabled persons had bachelor or higher degrees, and fewer worked in professional and managerial positions than people without disabilities. 3 To make it possible for disabled adults to get well-paying jobs, we must ensure that disabled youth have a solid educational foundation. That requires that more youth graduate high school; only 68.2% of students with disabilities …


There Is No Bruen Step Zero: The Law-Abiding Citizen And The Second Amendment, Jeff Campbell May 2023

There Is No Bruen Step Zero: The Law-Abiding Citizen And The Second Amendment, Jeff Campbell

University of the District of Columbia Law Review

In District of Columbia v. Heller, 1 the Supreme Court transformed Second Amendment law by adopting an originalist approach in gun-rights cases. Breaking from its previous cases, the Court recognized an individual right to bear arms, at least within the home.2 The Court’s method, while not fully specified, focused on history to determine the meaning of the Second Amendment. 3 But despite the abrupt change in the law, the anticipated revolution never really came. Lower courts turned away nearly every challenge to existing gun laws, sometimes by declining to extend Heller outside the home,4 sometimes by finding that the laws …


Board Members, University Of The District Of Columbia Law Review Jul 2022

Board Members, University Of The District Of Columbia Law Review

University of the District of Columbia Law Review

No abstract provided.


Is It Hot In Here Or Is It Just Me? A Call For Menopause Equity In The Workplace, Leslie Mullins Jul 2022

Is It Hot In Here Or Is It Just Me? A Call For Menopause Equity In The Workplace, Leslie Mullins

University of the District of Columbia Law Review

In a society where many topics related to female reproduction are considered taboo, menopause is especially stigmatized because of its intersection with age and a perception that a woman’s value ends with her reproductive ability.1 As described by Gail Sheehy (“Sheehy”) in The Silent Passage, menopause is “one of the most misunderstood passages in a woman's life.”2 Menopause causes shame and stigma because of its association with middle age in a culture obsessed with youth.3 The failure of courts to extend available protections to claims related to menopause denies millions of working persons protections from unlawful discrimination under the Americans …


"Serving Time And It's No Longer A Crime: An Analysis Of The Proposed Cannabis Administration And Opportunity Act, Its Potential Effects At The Federal And State Level, And A Guide For Practical Application By Local Government", R. Allyce Bailey Jul 2022

"Serving Time And It's No Longer A Crime: An Analysis Of The Proposed Cannabis Administration And Opportunity Act, Its Potential Effects At The Federal And State Level, And A Guide For Practical Application By Local Government", R. Allyce Bailey

University of the District of Columbia Law Review

There has been much recent discussion surrounding cannabis use with some researchers supporting the use of medical marijuana, some investors relishing in the recently booming cannabis and CBD industry, and some states decriminalizing marijuana and even harsh controlled substances. As it appears, at least some public opinion is changing regarding marijuana, but the law has not effectively caught up to that change. Bias in the criminal justice system has led to the over-policing of, higher conviction rates, and harsher sentences for minorities. Thus, the decriminalization of marijuana alone does not remedy the grave disproportionate negative effects on populations of color …


A More Grown-Up Response To Ordinary Adolescent Behaviors: Repealing Pins Laws To Protect And Empower D.C. Youth, Mae C. Quinn, Tierra Copeland, Tatyana Hopkins, Mary Brody Jul 2022

A More Grown-Up Response To Ordinary Adolescent Behaviors: Repealing Pins Laws To Protect And Empower D.C. Youth, Mae C. Quinn, Tierra Copeland, Tatyana Hopkins, Mary Brody

University of the District of Columbia Law Review

In February 2020, the District of Columbia (“District” or “D.C.”) Juvenile Justice Advisory Group (“JJAG”), issued an important report calling for decriminalization of “status offenses.” Status offenses are alleged youthful wrongdoings that are prosecuted in the District as “Persons in Need of Supervision” cases.1 This Position Paper provides additional support for JJAG’s recommendations. It offers guidance and suggestions to help the District successfully transition away from PINS prosecutions—while also ensuring community youth feel safe, supported, and empowered in their own lives as they transition to adulthood. The D.C. Metropolitan Police Department has historically been the enforcement arm to address youth …


The Missing Piece Of The Puzzle: The Intersection Of Race And Special Education, Tsega Zewdneh Shiferaw Jul 2022

The Missing Piece Of The Puzzle: The Intersection Of Race And Special Education, Tsega Zewdneh Shiferaw

University of the District of Columbia Law Review

The privileges allotted to Americans cannot be compared to any other country’s citizens. Americans have the liberty of saying what they want, thinking what they want, and acting freely in public. Nebiyat Shiferaw (“Nebiyat”) is a thirty-year-old African American man who is unable to speak and live independently because he has autism, also known as autism spectrum disorder (“ASD”). Nebiyat does not experience the same liberties as most Americans; he has gone through special education programs and has overcome discrimination, not because of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (“IDEA”), but because of his parents advocating for him. As a …


Title, University Of The District Of Columbia Law Review Mar 2021

Title, University Of The District Of Columbia Law Review

University of the District of Columbia Law Review

No abstract provided.


Political Redistricting In The Post-Rucho Era, Robert Fisch Mar 2021

Political Redistricting In The Post-Rucho Era, Robert Fisch

University of the District of Columbia Law Review

In January of 2011, the infamous “Snake by the Lake” was born.2 Stretching along the southern coast of Lake Erie, the 9th Congressional District of Ohio covers a 120 mile-long thin strip of the state.3 The district is less than one mile wide at certain locations and is considered contiguous, a state constitutional requirement for congressional districts,4 only because the “snake” passes through portions of Lake Erie.5 In creating the district, the Ohio Republican Party, the majority party in the state legislature at the time, drew the boundaries with the intent to limit the voting power of the Democrats in …


There Is No Justice When Low And Modest-Income D.C. Residents Are Forced To Represent Themselves In Civil Cases, Sheldon Krantz Mar 2021

There Is No Justice When Low And Modest-Income D.C. Residents Are Forced To Represent Themselves In Civil Cases, Sheldon Krantz

University of the District of Columbia Law Review

After spending more than twenty years as a white-collar criminal defense lawyer at DLA Piper and prior to that serving as a federal prosecutor, law professor, and law school dean, I had the opportunity to help develop and then share responsibility for directing the non-profit D.C. Affordable Law Firm (“DCALF”). 135 I learned from this experience that lawyers are rarely available for most of the low- and modest income District of Columbia (“D.C.”) residents who find themselves embroiled in civil matters in D.C. Superior Court on matters greatly impacting their lives. They become, as a result, self-represented litigants (“SRLs”) who …


Remarks: "When They Go Low, We Go Local" Strategies For Pursuing Dc Democracy In The Age Of Trump, Jon S. Bouker Esq. May 2020

Remarks: "When They Go Low, We Go Local" Strategies For Pursuing Dc Democracy In The Age Of Trump, Jon S. Bouker Esq.

University of the District of Columbia Law Review

Remarks of Jon S. Bouker, Esq., Chair, DC Appleseed Center for Law and Justice, at the University of the District of Columbia, David A. Clarke School of Law, Law Review Symposium, DC Democracy During the Time of Trump: 51 and 45.


2017 Keynote Speech: Dc Democracy During The Time Of Trump: 51 And 45!, Wade Henderson May 2020

2017 Keynote Speech: Dc Democracy During The Time Of Trump: 51 And 45!, Wade Henderson

University of the District of Columbia Law Review

Keynote speech of Wade Henderson at the University of the District of Columbia, David A. Clarke School of Law, Law Review Symposium, DC Democracy During the Time of Trump: 51 and 45.


Laboratory Of Democracy: How The District Of Columbia Is Using The Home Rule Act To Achieve Elements Of Statehood, Walter A. Smith Jr., Kevin M. Hilgers May 2020

Laboratory Of Democracy: How The District Of Columbia Is Using The Home Rule Act To Achieve Elements Of Statehood, Walter A. Smith Jr., Kevin M. Hilgers

University of the District of Columbia Law Review

On January 3, 2019, Congresswoman Eleanor Holmes Norton, the District of Columbia's (the "District') nonvoting delegate to the House of Representatives, reintroduced the Washington, D.C. Admission Act, which would make much of the District the 51st state. While Norton had made a tradition of opening each new Congress by introducing D.C. democracy bills, the context this time gave District advocates more reason to be optimistic. With the Democrats gaining control of the House, the bill gained a record 155 original cosponsors, and Representative Elijah Cummings, chair of the House Committee on Oversight and Reform, committed to holding a hearing on …


Sanctuary Cities? Asylum? Dreamers? When A House Is Not A Home: The Legal And Socioeconomic Implications Of National Populism On Local Governance And Individual Liberties, Rawle Andrews Jr., Sanchita Bose May 2020

Sanctuary Cities? Asylum? Dreamers? When A House Is Not A Home: The Legal And Socioeconomic Implications Of National Populism On Local Governance And Individual Liberties, Rawle Andrews Jr., Sanchita Bose

University of the District of Columbia Law Review

Since the 1950s, the U.S. has proudly boasted itself as "a nation of immigrants," However, immigration reform is amongst the most intensely confusing, divisive, and polarizing issues in America's public square. Immigration remains front and center in the public debate across the U.S., especially since the September 11th terrorist attacks. The fear and turmoil, which ebbed and flowed since the 9/11 tragedy, reached a boiling point during the 2016 general election cycle, and ultimately the election of the 45th president, Donald J. Trump. This article examines the impact and implications of a broken federal government on America's cities which are …


A Review Of The D.C. League Of Women Voters Project To Educate Sister Leagues Around The Country, Anne Anderson, Linda Beebe May 2020

A Review Of The D.C. League Of Women Voters Project To Educate Sister Leagues Around The Country, Anne Anderson, Linda Beebe

University of the District of Columbia Law Review

The League of Women Voters of the District of Columbia ("LWVDC"), a chapter of the League of Women Voters of the United States ("LWVUS" or the "League"), has long been a staunch supporter of equality for the District of Columbia ("D.C." or the "District") by advocating for voting rights in Congress, promoting local control of local affairs, and supporting a Constitutional amendment when it was proposed. Statehood for the People of D.C., as it is currently constructed, is a newer idea that has been shrouded in much confusion and misunderstanding for people in other parts of the country. In 2015, …


A Proposal To Win The District Of Columbia A Partial Vote In The House Of Representatives, Mary M. Cheh May 2020

A Proposal To Win The District Of Columbia A Partial Vote In The House Of Representatives, Mary M. Cheh

University of the District of Columbia Law Review

Unlike many citizens of the United States, citizens of the District of Columbia are denied a vote in the national legislature. Not only are they denied a voting representative on matters of national scope and importance, but Congress may control all facets of local governance for the 700,000 residents of the District. This paper suggests a new initiative. It calls for the D.C. Council, under its "Home Rule" authority granted by Congress, to amend a federal law, "The District of Columbia Delegate Act," ("Delgate Act") and give the District's delegate to the House of Representatives the authority to vote in …


Table Of Contents, University Of The District Of Columbia Law Review Mar 2020

Table Of Contents, University Of The District Of Columbia Law Review

University of the District of Columbia Law Review

No abstract provided.


Disability Rights Past, Present And Future: A Roadmap For Disability Rights, Marcy Karin, Lara Bollinger Mar 2020

Disability Rights Past, Present And Future: A Roadmap For Disability Rights, Marcy Karin, Lara Bollinger

University of the District of Columbia Law Review

The Americans with Disabilities Act (“ADA”)2 “was and is all about civil rights.”3 Enacted in 1990, its goal was to prohibit discrimination based on disability across society, from employment to places of public accommodation and government services. As the byproduct of bipartisan support and significant advocacy and leadership by members and allies of the disability community, there were high hopes that the ADA would live up to its goal. Unfortunately, that reality never came to pass for many individuals with disabilities. Instead, a line of Supreme Court decisions in 1999 and 2002 imposed increasingly narrow interpretations of the law’s core …


What Can The Protection And Advocacy Network Offer To Our Veterans?, David A. Boyer Mar 2020

What Can The Protection And Advocacy Network Offer To Our Veterans?, David A. Boyer

University of the District of Columbia Law Review

The desire to compensate veterans predates the establishment of the United States (“U.S.”). In 1636, individuals with disabilities received pensions for defending the Plymouth colony against Native Americans.1 Throughout history, this practice continued, as documented by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (“VA”).2 By 1930, President Herbert Hoover signed the Executive Order 5398, which created the Veterans Administration.3 Prior to President Hoover’s signing of that executive order, the available veteran services were divided by three separate governmental agencies: the Veterans’ Bureau, the Pensions Bureau, and the Soldiers’ Home.4 Consequently, that executive order combined all three agencies into one that concentrated …


Should Veterans Disability Compensation Be Conditional Upon Veterans Working Towards Rehabilitation And Return To Employment?, Heather Ansley, Aniela Szymanski Mar 2020

Should Veterans Disability Compensation Be Conditional Upon Veterans Working Towards Rehabilitation And Return To Employment?, Heather Ansley, Aniela Szymanski

University of the District of Columbia Law Review

The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) has experienced dramatic increases in its budgets since September 11, 2001.1 Increasing federal deficits during this time has led Congress to seek spending cuts, causing tensions in efforts to ensure that a declining veteran population receives the quality benefits and services they earned through years of service.2While the number of veterans in the United States has steadily been declining due to veterans of World War II, Korea, and Vietnam dying,3 the number of veterans receiving disability compensation has risen dramatically due to injuries sustained by service members in conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan, and …


Debilitating Southeastern Community College V. Davis: Achieving The Promise Of Disability Civil Rights, Leslie Francis Mar 2020

Debilitating Southeastern Community College V. Davis: Achieving The Promise Of Disability Civil Rights, Leslie Francis

University of the District of Columbia Law Review

Disability civil rights law today continues to be shaped by troubling precedent created in initial decisions of the Supreme Court under the Rehabilitation Act. This article explores the first of these decisions, Southeastern Community College v. Davis, demonstrates Davis’ continuing impact, and analyzes how this impact may be addressed. Davis was a suit brought by a hearing-impaired student who had been refused accommodations and denied admission to the College’s nursing program. Critical litigation decisions on behalf of Davis at the trial court did not contest the College’s failure to provide accommodations that are common today, such as sign interpretation, or …


Diversity And Inclusion In The American Legal Profession: First Phase Findings From A National Study Of Lawyers With Disabilities And Lawyers Who Identify As Lgbtq+, Peter Blanck, Ynesse Abdul-Malak, Meera Adya, Fitore Hyseni, Mary Killeen, Fatma Altunkol Wise Mar 2020

Diversity And Inclusion In The American Legal Profession: First Phase Findings From A National Study Of Lawyers With Disabilities And Lawyers Who Identify As Lgbtq+, Peter Blanck, Ynesse Abdul-Malak, Meera Adya, Fitore Hyseni, Mary Killeen, Fatma Altunkol Wise

University of the District of Columbia Law Review

This article presents initial, descriptive findings from the first phase of a national study, with a planned longitudinal component, conducted in collaboration with the American Bar Association (“ABA”).1 With representation from all U.S. regions and states, as well as the District of Columbia, the study examined lawyers with diverse backgrounds, with a primary focus on lawyers who identify as having health conditions, impairments, and disabilities, and on lawyers who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, or as having other sexual orientations and gender identities (“LGBTQ+” as an overarching term). Importantly, the investigation also considered the intersectional nature of these …


Challenging Transition-Related Care Exclusions Through Disability Rights Law, Kevin Barry Mar 2020

Challenging Transition-Related Care Exclusions Through Disability Rights Law, Kevin Barry

University of the District of Columbia Law Review

Despite the growing visibility and acceptance of transgender people, discrimination against them persists.1 Transgender people are routinely denied identity documents that accurately reflect their sex.2 They are excluded from service in the U.S. military and from the protections of state civil rights laws.3 They are fired from their jobs, evicted from their homes, turned away from homeless shelters, denied custody of their children, harassed by law enforcement, and deprived of access to appropriate single-sex services in schools, prisons, and immigration detention centers—because they are transgender.4


2017 Keynote Speech: Poverty's Cost, Daniel Hatcher Mar 2019

2017 Keynote Speech: Poverty's Cost, Daniel Hatcher

University of the District of Columbia Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Intersection Of Race, Bond, And "Crimmigration" In The United States Immigration Detention System, Tremaine Hemans Mar 2019

The Intersection Of Race, Bond, And "Crimmigration" In The United States Immigration Detention System, Tremaine Hemans

University of the District of Columbia Law Review

The United States ("U.S.") Supreme Court's recent decision in Jennings v. Rodriguez' has potentially opened another avenue for people of color to become entangled in the U.S.' predatory immigration system, through the denial of bail hearings. Denial of periodic bond hearings ensures that many detainees in immigration facilities will be held indefinitely until these detainees' cases are adjudicated. In Jennings, the Court held that detained aliens do not have a right to periodic bond hearings even if they are detained for prolonged periods of time, due to the language of the mandatory and discretionary detention statutes at §§ 1225(b)(1)-(2) and …


Taxation And Reducing Recidivism: A Legal Comparative Analysis Of Reducing Recidivism In States And A Federal Solution For The Future, Israel X. Nery, Scott B. Astrada Mar 2019

Taxation And Reducing Recidivism: A Legal Comparative Analysis Of Reducing Recidivism In States And A Federal Solution For The Future, Israel X. Nery, Scott B. Astrada

University of the District of Columbia Law Review

In this article, we will focus on employer-based tax incentives for hiring ex-offenders. Central to the discussion will be the Work Opportunity Tax Credit ("WOTC"), which provides a tax credit to employers who hire qualified employees/ex-offenders under the program. Additionally, we will explore various state programs modeled on a tax-based incentive and conduct a comparative assessment of where federal and state programs are effective and where there is potential for reform. Without targeted policy solutions to address employment obstacles, ex-offenders are left facing persistent employment barriers as they attempt to return to their communities and start a new life after …