Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Law Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Michigan Law Review

Coercion

Evidence

Articles 1 - 5 of 5

Full-Text Articles in Law

Empty Promises: Miranda Warnings In Noncustodial Interrogations, Aurora Maoz May 2012

Empty Promises: Miranda Warnings In Noncustodial Interrogations, Aurora Maoz

Michigan Law Review

You have the right to remain silent; anything you say can be used against you in a court of law. You have the right to an attorney; if you cannot afford an attorney, one will be provided to you at the state's expense. In 2010, the Supreme Court declined an opportunity to resolve the question of what courts should do when officers administer Miranda warnings in a situation where a suspect is not already in custody-in other words, when officers are not constitutionally required to give or honor these warnings. While most courts have found a superfluous warning to be …


Police-Obtained Evidence And The Constitution: Distinguishing Unconstitutionally Obtained Evidence From Unconstitutionally Used Evidence, Arnold H. Loewy Apr 1989

Police-Obtained Evidence And The Constitution: Distinguishing Unconstitutionally Obtained Evidence From Unconstitutionally Used Evidence, Arnold H. Loewy

Michigan Law Review

The article will consider four different types of police-obtained evidence: evidence obtained from an unconstitutional search and seizure, evidence obtained from a Miranda violation, confessions and lineup identifications obtained in violation of the sixth amendment right to counsel, and coerced confessions. My conclusions are that evidence obtained from an unconstitutional search and seizure is excluded because of the police misconduct by which it was obtained. On the other hand, evidence obtained from a Miranda violation is (or ought to be) excluded because use of that evidence compromises the defendant's procedural right not to be compelled to be a witness against …


Constitutional Law - Due Process - Judicial Review Of Jury Determination On Coerced Character Of Confession, James M. Potter S.Ed. Jan 1955

Constitutional Law - Due Process - Judicial Review Of Jury Determination On Coerced Character Of Confession, James M. Potter S.Ed.

Michigan Law Review

Petitioner, suspected of the murder of his parents, was subjected to intensive police interrogation culminating in a confession to a state-employed psychiatrist. Petitioner had been allowed only a small amount of sleep and was suffering from a sinus condition when he was introduced to the psychiatrist, who was represented as a general practitioner. The questioning of the psychiatrist, who was skilled in hypnosis, was a subtle blend of threats and promises of leniency. Within the next three and one-half hours petitioner also confessed to a police captain, a business associate, and two assistant state prosecutors. The confession to the psychiatrist …


Evidence - Admissibility Of Defendants Refusal To Submit To A Blood Test For Intoxication, David Davidoff Apr 1942

Evidence - Admissibility Of Defendants Refusal To Submit To A Blood Test For Intoxication, David Davidoff

Michigan Law Review

Defendant was convicted of operating a motor vehicle while intoxicated. This appeal was based on the contention that the testimony by a deputy sheriff of defendant's refusal to submit to a blood test to determine whether or not he was intoxicated violated his privilege against self-incrimination and was inadmissible. Held, the evidence was properly admitted. State v. Benson, (Iowa, 1941) 300 N. W. 275.


Searches And Seizures - Effect Of Coercion - Waiver Of Constitutional Privilege By Wife In Husband's Absence, Michigan Law Review May 1939

Searches And Seizures - Effect Of Coercion - Waiver Of Constitutional Privilege By Wife In Husband's Absence, Michigan Law Review

Michigan Law Review

The defendant and his son were shot as prowlers while they were taking a "short-cut" through the informant's barnyard. They managed to reach home, where after a physician's treatment they were placed under arrest and taken to jail on a charge of stealing the informant's chickens. Later some of the arresting officers returned to the defendant's home without a search warrant. Whether or not the wife's consent was secured is disputed, but a search was made of the defendant's henhouse, and thirty-one chickens were seized as stolen property. Before the commencement of the trial, a motion filed by the defendant …