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Articles 1 - 7 of 7

Full-Text Articles in Law

Judicial Power In Latin America: A Short Survey, Teresa M. Miguel-Stearns Jan 2015

Judicial Power In Latin America: A Short Survey, Teresa M. Miguel-Stearns

Librarian Scholarship Series

This article, written by Teresa M. Miguel-Stearns, explores the vast differences in judicial authority not only between the common law and civil law traditions, but also among various countries steeped in the civil law tradition in Latin America. Judicial review, certiorari, precedent, and other functions and characteristics of the judiciaries of five distinctly different countries (Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, and Mexico) are compared and contrasted with each other and with the common law tradition. This evaluation demonstrates that despite their, arguably, similar distant histories and legal foundations, each country has evolved into a unique legal system with significant differences in ...


Who Let The Dog Out? Implementing A Successful Therapy Dog Program In An Academic Law Library, Julian Aiken, Femi Cadmus Jan 2011

Who Let The Dog Out? Implementing A Successful Therapy Dog Program In An Academic Law Library, Julian Aiken, Femi Cadmus

Librarian Scholarship Series

No abstract provided.


Book Review: The Legal Landscape -- A Review Of John Copeland Nagle, Law's Environment: How The Law Shapes The Places We Live, Julie G. Krishnaswami Jan 2011

Book Review: The Legal Landscape -- A Review Of John Copeland Nagle, Law's Environment: How The Law Shapes The Places We Live, Julie G. Krishnaswami

Librarian Scholarship Series

In "Law's Environment: How the Law Shapes the Places We Live," Hone Copeland Nagle reflects on unremarkarkable geographical lands impacted by major environmental legislation and considers the values implicit in environmental legislation. Nagle's thesis is that multiple environmental laws typically weave together to shape a region. IN this text, the consequences of environmental legislation are examined by looking at the impact of the laws on the natural environment of five distinct places.


Book Review: Privacy And Confidentiality Issues: A Guide For Libraries And Their Lawyers, Julie G. Krishnaswami Jan 2009

Book Review: Privacy And Confidentiality Issues: A Guide For Libraries And Their Lawyers, Julie G. Krishnaswami

Librarian Scholarship Series

The privacy and confidentiality of library patrons concerned many public libraries after September 11, particularly because of the passage and enforcement of the Patriot Act. Theresa Chmara, a litigator who has represented the American Library Association, the Freedom to Read Foundation, and the American Bookseller’s Association, provides concise and useful guidelines for libraries about these and other related issues in Privacy and Confidentiality Issues: A Guide for Libraries and Their Lawyers. This work is highly recommend for public library directors but should be required professional reading for all library directors. Additionally, library schools, which have an obligation to educate ...


It’S The Institution: Librarians Join The Revolution To Open The Judicial System To Self-Represented Litigants, Julie G. Krishnaswami Jan 2009

It’S The Institution: Librarians Join The Revolution To Open The Judicial System To Self-Represented Litigants, Julie G. Krishnaswami

Librarian Scholarship Series

Innovations in information literacy is not only taking place in academic law libraries, law firm libraries, and court libraries but simultaneously occurring in the legal system. Innovation also means rethinking - and remaking - institutions that no longer serve us well. As any lawyer or non-lawyer can confirm, the traditional legal system has ignored the needs of self-represented litigants, now flooding courtrooms, seeking solutions to real and significant problems. Yet, revolution is afoot, and the judicial system is responding to accommodate this new class of users. Presenter Richard Zorza, introduced by Charles Dyer as an "instigator of innovation," spoke about the movement ...


Book Review: Viral Spiral: How The Commoners Built A Digital Republic Of Their Own, Julie G. Krishnaswami Jan 2009

Book Review: Viral Spiral: How The Commoners Built A Digital Republic Of Their Own, Julie G. Krishnaswami

Librarian Scholarship Series

Book review of David Bollier's Viral Spiral (2008). The Internet today is controlled chaos: user-generated content on Web 2.0 platforms, blogs by citizen-journalists, social networks such as Facebook and Twitter, the photo-sharing community of Flickr, digital remixes of music and videos, wikis, open-access journals, and e-books. The Web has been transformed and a new cultural movement - known as "Free Culture" or "the commons" - is underway. Members of the Free Culture movement (commoners) value collaboration, share intellectual property, are self-directed, and resourceful. Yet these trailblazing individuals are simultaneously entrepreneurial and well-aware of traditional market forces. In Viral Spiral: A ...


Justice Sandra Day O'Conner: A Selected Annotated Bibliography, Julie G. Krishnaswami Jan 2008

Justice Sandra Day O'Conner: A Selected Annotated Bibliography, Julie G. Krishnaswami

Librarian Scholarship Series

As the first woman appointed to the Supreme Court, Justice Sandra Day O’Connor is a profound and fascinating figure in American jurisprudence. During Ronald Reagan’s presidential campaign, he promised to appoint a woman to the Supreme Court, and he appointed Sandra Day O’Connor. She was confirmed in 1981 and spent the next twenty-four years on the Supreme Court bench, retiring in 2005. Before her time on the Court, Justice O’Connor devoted herself to public service as an assistant attorney general, deputy county attorney, Arizona state senator and senate minority leader, Maricopa County Superior Court judge, and ...