Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Law Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Law Faculty Articles and Essays

Discipline
Keyword
Publication Year

Articles 1 - 30 of 629

Full-Text Articles in Law

The Power Of Vulnerability In Promoting A Sense Of Belonging: The Perspective Of A First-Generation American, Karin Mika Aug 2022

The Power Of Vulnerability In Promoting A Sense Of Belonging: The Perspective Of A First-Generation American, Karin Mika

Law Faculty Articles and Essays

It is my intention that students teach each other through really getting to know one another and finding commonality in each other’s experiences. Most of us live in a social bubble, partially because we feel vulnerable in worlds where we perceive that we do not belong. By sharing vulnerabilities, we are able to expand our world to not only understand our commonalities, but to get a new view of what we thought was inalterable. By sharing my own experience as an out-sider, I am better able to encourage students to consider more deeply the opinions of others and to learn …


A Stitch In Time Saves Nine: How The State Of Ohio Can Save Money And Distress Through Legal Training For Pre-Service Teachers, Karin Mika, Christine Mika Jul 2022

A Stitch In Time Saves Nine: How The State Of Ohio Can Save Money And Distress Through Legal Training For Pre-Service Teachers, Karin Mika, Christine Mika

Law Faculty Articles and Essays

For simplicity, this Note will focus on the educational requirements for high school teachers rather than elementary or middle school teachers. Here, the requirements include core content instruction, literacy instruction, and a 12-week student teaching experience. Additionally, ODHE issues a vague requirement of preparation in six different Ohio school-related standards. Only one of those standards, the Ohio Standards for the Teaching Profession, even mentions correctly applying the law.

There is clearly a need for some form of legal preparation for teachers in Ohio that must take place before an individual becomes a teacher. Not only is there an ethical obligation …


Lessons Of The Past And The Humanitarian Outreach Of Poland To Ukrainian Refugees, Karin Mika Jun 2022

Lessons Of The Past And The Humanitarian Outreach Of Poland To Ukrainian Refugees, Karin Mika

Law Faculty Articles and Essays

The reaction of Poland and its people is a refreshing departure from the historic blood rivalries of the past. This is similarly true of both Romania and Hungary; however, it is Poland that has absorbed the majority of Ukrainian refugees and Poland that has the most historically contentious relationship with Ukraine. Poland’s current humanitarian efforts with respect to its Ukrainian neighbors is evidence that some lessons have been learned from the past. Perhaps there is hope that some of the centuries old blood feuding can come to an end and countries can better work toward cooperative relationships in the future.


Obergefell V. Hodges—And The Use Of Oral Argument And Storytelling To Reinforce Competencies In The Legal Writing Classroom, Karin Mika Apr 2022

Obergefell V. Hodges—And The Use Of Oral Argument And Storytelling To Reinforce Competencies In The Legal Writing Classroom, Karin Mika

Law Faculty Articles and Essays

Legal writing professors struggle with trying to balance learning skills with the bigger picture of learning that law is ultimately about having the power to change lives. Often, learning the skills becomes completely separated from the human aspect of the law. Although we all work toward unifying the two concepts, it is not always done by having discussions about the bigger issues, or even having the students look at more traditional sources such as briefs or even law review articles. Oyez and the oral tradition of storytelling presented by radio (or other similar resources) have the potential of more fully …


Grotian Moments And Statehood, Milena Sterio Jan 2022

Grotian Moments And Statehood, Milena Sterio

Law Faculty Articles and Essays

Grotian Moments are instances of accelerated formation of customary law, sparked by significant world events, such as wars, terrorist attacks, or natural catastrophes. This Article applies the Grotian Moment theory to the legal criteria of statehood, in an attempt to assess whether an evolution in specific elements of statehood has resulted in such paradigm-shifting Grotian Moments. In Part II, this Article analyzes the Grotian Moment theory while distinguishing it from other types of customary law formation. Part III focuses on the legal theory of statehood and each of its constitutive elements. Part IV discusses whether any such elements of statehood …


Miranda In Taiwan: Why It Failed And Why We Should Care, Shih-Chun Steven Chien Jan 2022

Miranda In Taiwan: Why It Failed And Why We Should Care, Shih-Chun Steven Chien

Law Faculty Articles and Essays

In 1997, the Taiwanese legislature amended the Code of Criminal Procedure to incorporate the core of the American Miranda rule into the legal system. The Miranda rule requires police officers and prosecutors to notify criminal suspects subject to custodial interrogation of their right to remain silent and their right to retain legal counsel. In subsequent amendments, the legislature enacted a series of laws to further reform interrogation practices in the same vein.

What happened next is a study in unintended consequences and the interdependence of law and culture. Using ethnographic methods and data sources collected over the past four years …


Talking Foreign Policy: "Blood & Treasure", Milena Sterio, Michael P. Scharf, Gregory P. Noone, Sandra Hodgkinson, Darin Johnson Jan 2022

Talking Foreign Policy: "Blood & Treasure", Milena Sterio, Michael P. Scharf, Gregory P. Noone, Sandra Hodgkinson, Darin Johnson

Law Faculty Articles and Essays

Talking Foreign Policy is a production of Case Western Reserve University and is produced in partnership with 90.3 FM WCPN ideastream. Questions and comments about the topics discussed on the show, or to suggest future topics, go to talkingforeignpolicy@case.edu.

SEPTEMBER 28, 2021 BROADCAST


Love Is Love: The Fundamental Right To Love, Marriage, And Obergefell V. Hodges, Reginald Oh Jan 2022

Love Is Love: The Fundamental Right To Love, Marriage, And Obergefell V. Hodges, Reginald Oh

Law Faculty Articles and Essays

Fourteenth Amendment substantive due process fundamental rights doctrine is about love. It is, at least, based on a close reading of Justice Anthony Kennedy’s majority opinion in Obergefell v. Hodges, the case in which the Supreme Court held that same-sex marriage is a fundamental right of individual autonomy and dignity.

Part I of this Article discusses the concept of love. Part II examines Justice Kennedy’s majority opinion in Obergefell and argues that it expresses unconditional love for LGBT people in tone, language, and substance. Part III argues that, in Obergefell, Kennedy’s key reasons for concluding that marriage is …


The Qualified Immunity Paradox And The Sixth Circuit’S Moderwell Opinion: A Harbinger Of Better Things To Come?, Doron M. Kalir Apr 2021

The Qualified Immunity Paradox And The Sixth Circuit’S Moderwell Opinion: A Harbinger Of Better Things To Come?, Doron M. Kalir

Law Faculty Articles and Essays

This note discusses the requirement of "clearly-established law," which a plaintiff needs to show in order to overcome a qualified immunity defense. This requirement--in essence, asking a plaintiff to show that someone else in their shoes has already prevailed in similar circumstances--may lead to an infinite regression paradox. The Note discusses this paradox and the ways in which the Supreme Court, and now the Sixth Circuit, have begun to resolve it.


Darryl Robinson's Model For International Criminal Law: Deontic Principles Developed Through A Coherentist Approach, Milena Sterio Apr 2021

Darryl Robinson's Model For International Criminal Law: Deontic Principles Developed Through A Coherentist Approach, Milena Sterio

Law Faculty Articles and Essays

Darryl Robinson’s new book, Justice in Extreme Cases: Criminal Law Theory Meets International Criminal Law, presents a compelling argument: that international criminal law would benefit from deontic reasoning. According to Robinson, this type of deontic reasoning “requires us to consider the limits of personal fault and punishability,” and is a “normative reasoning that focuses on our duties and obligations to others.” Moreover, Robinson argues in this book that coherentism is the best method for identifying and defining deontic principles. Robinson explains that coherentism is an approach where “[w]e use all of our critical reasoning tools to test past understandings …


Just Plain Dumb?: How Digital Contact Tracing Apps Could’Ve Worked Better (And Why They Never Got The Chance), Brian E. Ray Jan 2021

Just Plain Dumb?: How Digital Contact Tracing Apps Could’Ve Worked Better (And Why They Never Got The Chance), Brian E. Ray

Law Faculty Articles and Essays

This essay describes how the privacy debate that emerged over digital contact tracing and Google’s and Apple’s decisions to strictly limit apps permitted to use their platforms resulted in undercutting their potential usefulness as a tool to combat the pandemic while still failing to engender trust in these tools as intended.


Change At The Speed Of Leadership, Lee Fisher Jan 2021

Change At The Speed Of Leadership, Lee Fisher

Law Faculty Articles and Essays

“The most dangerous leadership myth is that leaders are born—that there is a genetic factor to leadership. . . That’s nonsense; in fact, the opposite is true. Leaders are made rather than born.”

“Lawyers are in the anomalous position of serving as leaders but generally lacking leadership training and skills. Competency in lawyering skills often functions as a proxy for leadership skills, despite the evidence that leadership skills are distinct and may take years to develop. Our neglect of leadership skills is reaching crisis proportions because nearly half of all current law firm partners will retire within the next ten …


Reforming The High-States Gamble Of Covert Government Seizures, Jonathan Witmer-Rich Jan 2021

Reforming The High-States Gamble Of Covert Government Seizures, Jonathan Witmer-Rich

Law Faculty Articles and Essays

In a covert government seizure, police secretly enter a home when no one is present and seize contraband, often staging the scene to look like a burglary. These covert seizures are authorized by delayed notice search warrants. This Article identifies two serious problems with this practice and proposes reforms.

The first problem is that a successful covert seizure will likely provoke violent retaliation against innocent third parties. If the target of the covert seizure--say a drug dealer--believes someone has stolen a valuable drug stash, the dealer will seek to kill or harm whomever they believe conducted the burglary. The statute …


Who Wants To Be A Prosecutor? And Why Care? Law Students’ Career Aspirations And Reform Prosecutors’ Goals, Shih-Chun Steven Chien, Stephen Daniels Jan 2021

Who Wants To Be A Prosecutor? And Why Care? Law Students’ Career Aspirations And Reform Prosecutors’ Goals, Shih-Chun Steven Chien, Stephen Daniels

Law Faculty Articles and Essays

Often called “progressive” or “reform” prosecutors, a number of reform-minded prosecutors have been elected recently across the United States—promising a distinctive vision of criminal justice and signaling that their role will be more attuned to issues of race and equity than “law and order.” Furthering this vision requires dramatic changes to the working cultures—the norms, practices, and even personnel—of their offices. Diversity plays a major role.

One central challenge is identifying, attracting, and hiring newly-minted lawyers who can, over time, be socialized into and sustain a changing organizational culture. This article empirically examines that challenge, which involves two sides of …


Women As Judges At International Criminal Tribunals, Milena Sterio Oct 2020

Women As Judges At International Criminal Tribunals, Milena Sterio

Law Faculty Articles and Essays

This Article analyzes the presence of female judges within international criminal tribunals, starting with the Yugoslavia and Rwanda Tribunals in the 1990s. In particular, the Article discusses specific numbers of female judges at the Yugoslavia and Rwanda Tribunals, the Special Court for Sierra Leone, the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia, the Special Tribunal for Lebanon, the newly created Kosovo Specialist Chambers, and the International Criminal Court.

While the presence of women as prosecutors, defense attorneys, victim representatives, and other professionals at these tribunals is equally important, this Article focuses on the number of female judges, as such data …


Equitable Defenses In Patent Law, Christa J. Laser Oct 2020

Equitable Defenses In Patent Law, Christa J. Laser

Law Faculty Articles and Essays

In patent law, “unenforceability” can have immense consequences. At least five equitable doctrines make up the defense of “unenforceability” as it was codified into the Patent Act in 1952: laches; estoppel; unclean hands; patent misuse; and according to some, inequitable conduct. Yet in the seventy years since incorporation of equitable defenses into the patent statute, the Supreme Court has not clarified their reach. Indeed, twice in the last four years, the Supreme Court avoided giving complete guidance on the crucial questions of whether, and when, such equitable defenses are available to bar damages in cases brought at law.

Several interpretive …


Certiorari In Patent Cases, Christa J. Laser Oct 2020

Certiorari In Patent Cases, Christa J. Laser

Law Faculty Articles and Essays

In the decade from 2010 to 2019, the Supreme Court has decided more patent law cases than in the prior three decades combined. A higher percentage of its docket has been patent cases--5.45%--than in any decade in the last century. A number of scholars have advanced theories of why this rate of review of patent cases has increased and provided quantitative analyses. Yet no scholarship to date has used qualitative data to investigate why the Supreme Court’s patent docket is increasing and what factors the Supreme Court considers in its review of patent cases. This paper shares statistics of the …


Striving For The Mountaintop: The Elimination Of Health Disparities In A Time Of Retrenchment (1968-2018), Gwendolyn R. Majette Oct 2020

Striving For The Mountaintop: The Elimination Of Health Disparities In A Time Of Retrenchment (1968-2018), Gwendolyn R. Majette

Law Faculty Articles and Essays

Health disparities in the United States are real. People of color are the adverse beneficiaries of these facts-lower life expectancy, higher rates of morbidity and mortality, and poorer health outcomes in general. This Article analyzes the laws and policies that improve and create barriers to improving people of color's health since the death of Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr. in 1968. The Article builds upon my earlier scholarship and considers the effectiveness of the "PPACA Framework to Eliminate Health Disparities" since the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) was enacted in 2010.

The Article also explores the impact of …


Introductory Note To United Nations Security Council Resolution 2498, Milena Sterio Jun 2020

Introductory Note To United Nations Security Council Resolution 2498, Milena Sterio

Law Faculty Articles and Essays

On November 15, 2019, the United Nations Security Council passed Resolution 2498, which extended the mandate of the previously established Panel of Experts of Somalia by an additional year; the Resolution also expanded the scope of the Panel's inquiry by specifically tasking the Panel to investigate Al-Shabaab's revenue sources and illegal taxation schemes.


Consentability, Autonomy, And Self-Actualization, Jonathan Witmer-Rich Apr 2020

Consentability, Autonomy, And Self-Actualization, Jonathan Witmer-Rich

Law Faculty Articles and Essays

This essay evaluates several competing principles underlying consent, such as self-interest, self-sovereignty, and self-actualization. Witmer-Rich argues that the nature of consent depends heavily on which of these underlying values consent is believed to serve and concludes that “self-actualization—the ongoing human project of creating and embodying coherent and meaningful values and choices—is the most fundamental good of autonomy and is the good that society should seek to further in the law of consent.”


Introductory Note: Georgia V. Russia (European Court Of Human Rights), Milena Sterio Apr 2020

Introductory Note: Georgia V. Russia (European Court Of Human Rights), Milena Sterio

Law Faculty Articles and Essays

In a January 31, 2019 decision, the European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR, or Court) held that Russia, the respondent state, should pay Georgia, the applicant state, 10 million euros as just satisfaction for violations committed by Russia against Georgian nationals; these violations had previously been established in the Court's main judgment in 2014 (Georgia v. Russia). The Court also held that Georgia should distribute this amount to approximately fifteen hundred Georgian victims, which had been identified in the Court's main judgment in 2014. In this important decision, the ECtHR continued to build on its recent case law, in holding …


Cities And Citizens Seethe: A Case Study Of Local Efforts To Influence Natural Gas Pipeline Routing Decisions, Heidi Gorovitz Robertson Apr 2020

Cities And Citizens Seethe: A Case Study Of Local Efforts To Influence Natural Gas Pipeline Routing Decisions, Heidi Gorovitz Robertson

Law Faculty Articles and Essays

This Article explores the reasons local governments find difficulty influencing pipeline-routing decisions. For example, federal law controls interstate natural gas pipeline permitting, which is complicated and inaccessible. State law, particularly in Ohio, heavily favors utilities, in part by preempting local efforts to make local decisions regarding oil and gas development. Finally, the information gaps are enormous between what local governments need to influence pipeline-routing decisions and what is accessible.

This Article addresses barriers to local influence by discussing the efforts of citizens and local governments to influence the routing of NexusSpectra's natural gas transmission pipeline, which was recently constructed and …


Talking Foreign Policy: The Rohingya Genocide, Milena Sterio, Todd Buchwald, Jenny Domino, Rebecca Hamilton, Michael P. Scharf, Paul R. Williams Jan 2020

Talking Foreign Policy: The Rohingya Genocide, Milena Sterio, Todd Buchwald, Jenny Domino, Rebecca Hamilton, Michael P. Scharf, Paul R. Williams

Law Faculty Articles and Essays

Talking Foreign Policy is a production of Case Western Reserve University and is produced in partnership with 90.3 FM WCPN ideastream. Questions and comments about the topics discussed on the show, or to suggest future topics, go to talkingforeignpolicy@case.edu.

OCTOBER 1, 2019 BROADCAST


Sociolegal Research, The Law School Survey Of Student Engagement, And Studying Diversity In Judicial Clerkships, Shih-Chun Steven Chien, Ajay K. Mehrotra, Xiangnong Wang Jan 2020

Sociolegal Research, The Law School Survey Of Student Engagement, And Studying Diversity In Judicial Clerkships, Shih-Chun Steven Chien, Ajay K. Mehrotra, Xiangnong Wang

Law Faculty Articles and Essays

The Law School Survey of Student Engagement (LSSSE) is an extraordinary asset for examining a vast array of topics related to the educational experiences of law students. By focusing on student-oriented surveys, LSSSE provides law schools and researchers an invaluable opportunity to delve into a wide range of issues dealing with the law student experience, including the career preferences and expectations of students throughout their law school years. In particular, there remains a wealth of opportunity for scholars interested in using LSSSE data to explore issues of diversity, equity, and inclusion in legal education and the profession.

The American Bar …


Black Citizenship, Dehumanization, And The Fourteenth Amendment, Reginald Oh Jan 2020

Black Citizenship, Dehumanization, And The Fourteenth Amendment, Reginald Oh

Law Faculty Articles and Essays

The fight for full Black citizenship has been in large measure a fight against the systematic dehumanization of African Americans. Dehumanization is the process of treating people as less than human, as subhuman. Denying Blacks full and equal citizenship has gone hand in hand with denying their full humanity. To effectively promote equal citizenship for African Americans, therefore, requires an explicit commitment to ending their dehumanization.

In this Essay, Part I discusses the concept of dehumanization and its role in the infliction of harm on a dehumanized class of people. Part II discusses the concept of citizenship, and contend that …


Let She Who Has The Womb Speak: Regulating The Use Of Human Oocyte Cryopreservation To The Detriment Of Older Women, Browne C. Lewis Jan 2020

Let She Who Has The Womb Speak: Regulating The Use Of Human Oocyte Cryopreservation To The Detriment Of Older Women, Browne C. Lewis

Law Faculty Articles and Essays

This article is divided into three parts. Part I examines the arguments in favor of banning human oocyte cryopreservation. Part II explores the reasons some opponents of human oocyte cryopreservation might give to support restrictions on the use of frozen oocytes. Part III analyzes the possible ethical and legal challenges that may arise in the event that the government seeks to ban the use of frozen oocytes or restrict the use of frozen oocytes based solely on the age of the potential mother.


Set The Controls For The Heart Of The Moon: Is Existing Law Sufficient To Enable Resource Extraction On The Moon?, Mark J. Sundahl, Jeffrey A. Murphy Jan 2020

Set The Controls For The Heart Of The Moon: Is Existing Law Sufficient To Enable Resource Extraction On The Moon?, Mark J. Sundahl, Jeffrey A. Murphy

Law Faculty Articles and Essays

This Article argues that despite the existence of some open questions regarding fine points in the law and the unlikelihood of a new treaty regulating lunar activity, investors (of whatever type, whether public or private) should not be deterred due to any concern about the state of the law. The current regulatory process to launch a vehicle and operate a payload may be “clunky” in places, but it is not unduly burdensome. While there is plenty of debate about regulatory reform, it is a debate about how to improve the existing system—not necessarily to fix it. In other words, existing …


The International Criminal Court: Current Challenges And Prospect Of Future Success, Milena Sterio Jan 2020

The International Criminal Court: Current Challenges And Prospect Of Future Success, Milena Sterio

Law Faculty Articles and Essays

The ICC has served as an agent of impunity since its inception in 1998, and its fundamental role in the field of international criminal justice as a permanent accountability mechanism remains undisputed. The court is, however, facing significant challenges which may threaten its legitimacy. These challenges can be surmounted if the court is willing to take a hard look at its own procedures, prosecutorial practices, and judicial attitudes. The ICC's future may be bright if the court makes significant changes in the present.


Dehumanization, Immigrants, And Equal Protection, Reginald Oh Oct 2019

Dehumanization, Immigrants, And Equal Protection, Reginald Oh

Law Faculty Articles and Essays

This article is divided into three parts. Part I explores the concept of dehumanization and its central role in the subordination of marginalized groups. Part II discusses the equal protection doctrine of suspect classes by analyzing key decisions by the Court and its reasoning for whether or not to consider a particular group as a suspect class. Part II also argues that the decision in Brown v. Board of Education regards racial segregation in public schools as a form of racial dehumanization and provides the doctrinal basis to consider dehumanization a central factor in determining suspect class status. Part III …


Talking Foreign Policy: Untangling The Yemen Crisis, Milena Sterio, Michael P. Scharf, Paul R. Williams, James Johnson, Laura Graham Apr 2019

Talking Foreign Policy: Untangling The Yemen Crisis, Milena Sterio, Michael P. Scharf, Paul R. Williams, James Johnson, Laura Graham

Law Faculty Articles and Essays

Talking Foreign Policy is a production of Case Western Reserve University and is produced in partnership with 90.3 FM WCPN ideastream. Questions and comments about the topics discussed on the show, or to suggest future topics, go to talkingforeignpolicy@case.edu.