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Arthur Soden's Legacy: The Origins And Early History Of Baseball's Reserve System, Edmund P. Edmonds Jan 2012

Arthur Soden's Legacy: The Origins And Early History Of Baseball's Reserve System, Edmund P. Edmonds

Journal Articles

The article focuses on the nineteenth century evolution of the U.S. baseball reserves system. It mentions that the early history of the reserve clause establishes a relationship with sports collective bargaining agreements. It notes that its basic structure stems from a dispute between Boston owner Arthur Soden and baseball players James O'Rourke and George Wright. It also emphasizes on discipline imposed to the players who abandon their contracts to seek higher salaries from a different team.


Radical Reform Of Intercollegiate Athletics: Antitrust And Public Policy Implications, Stephen F. Ross Jan 2012

Radical Reform Of Intercollegiate Athletics: Antitrust And Public Policy Implications, Stephen F. Ross

Journal Articles

Universities operating major intercollegiate athletic programs are heading for, if not already in, a crisis. Corruption continues to affect major football and basketball programs, exacerbated by a failure of imagination and will in identifying and deterring corruption, and by a lack of consensus on what constitutes "corruption" when football and men's basketball stars generate millions of dollars but cannot enjoy a lifestyle commensurate with many peer students. Current levels of spending are nonsustainable at many schools. Even where intercollegiate athletic programs are sustained primarily by football and basketball revenues, otherwise visionary and questioning college presidents have yet to publicly question …


Dastar's Next Stand, Mark Mckenna Jan 2012

Dastar's Next Stand, Mark Mckenna

Journal Articles

A series of recent cases implicate the extent to which trademark law can be used to control creative content. The possibility of using trademark law for that purpose obviously creates a potential conflict with copyright law, which ordinarily sets the rules for use of creative material developed by others. Unfortunately, despite its attraction to boundary questions in trademark law, the Supreme Court‘s Dastar decision—its lone decision demarcating trademark and copyright law—remains controversial and its scope somewhat unclear. This Essay argues that Dastar should be understood, or at least should be extended, to rule out any claims based on confusion that …