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Full-Text Articles in Law

Book Review, Angela Mae Kupenda Jan 2008

Book Review, Angela Mae Kupenda

Journal Articles

YOUR BLUES AIN’T LIKE MINE is an excellently written, fictionalized account of the lives of several people set in the fifties as a rural Mississippi community reacts to impending school racial desegregation and the killing of a fifteen year old black boy who had the misfortune of speaking French in the direction of a white woman. I’ve used this book to facilitate discussion on issues of race, gender, the law, class, and politics in several of my law school classes such as Race and the Law, Gender and the Law, and Civil Rights.


Simply Put: How Diversity Benefits Whites And How Whites Can Simply Benefit Diversity, Angela Mae Kupenda Jan 2008

Simply Put: How Diversity Benefits Whites And How Whites Can Simply Benefit Diversity, Angela Mae Kupenda

Journal Articles

Although there are surmountable legal barriers to racial integration in education, fuller integration is possible. But first, whites must see how they benefit from diversity, and, second, whites must take simple steps toward integration that may, in turn, reveal to whites their desire to become more fully integrated. These two steps may help remove the limiting point to true integration.


Restoring The Ada And Beyond: Disability In The 21st Century, Robert L. Burgdorf Jan 2008

Restoring The Ada And Beyond: Disability In The 21st Century, Robert L. Burgdorf

Journal Articles

Perhaps it was imprudent for me to agree, in response to the request of the symposium organizers, to address the future of disability law. Nobel Prize-winning physicist Neils Bohr supposedly once said that "[p]rediction is very difficult, especially about the future."' Columnist and author Jim Bishop wrote, "The future is an opaque mirror. Anyone who tries to look into it sees nothing but the dim outlines of an old and worried face." 2 Prognosticating is a very tricky and uncertain undertaking. I cannot pretend to have any particular gift for crystal ball gazing in disability matters. When I joined the …


A Case Of Statutory Interpretation: Does 42 U.S.C. 1981 Prohibit Retaliation, Barbara J. Fick Jan 2008

A Case Of Statutory Interpretation: Does 42 U.S.C. 1981 Prohibit Retaliation, Barbara J. Fick

Journal Articles

This article discusses the case CBOCS West, Inc. v. Humphries, 553 U.S. 442 (2008). That case presented two questions: (1) Can an employee bring a claim under 42 U.8.C. § 1981 if he is terminated from employment because he has complained about racial discrimination at work?; and (2) Can the language of the statute be interpreted to include retaliation claims? Professor Fick argues that the this case is of great concern to employers whose liability for retaliation will be greatly expanded if the statute is interpreted to include retaliation claims and also that the case may be important from a …


U.S. Immigration Policy: Contract Or Human Rights Law?, Victor C. Romero Jan 2008

U.S. Immigration Policy: Contract Or Human Rights Law?, Victor C. Romero

Journal Articles

The current immigration debate often reflects a tension between affirming the individual rights of migrants against the power of a nation to control its borders. An examination of U.S. Supreme Court precedent reveals that, from our earliest immigration history to the present time, our immigration policy has functioned more like contract law than human rights law, with the Court deferring to the power of Congress to define the terms of that contract at the expense of the immigrant's freedom.