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Full-Text Articles in Law

Introducing Classcrits: Rejecting Class-Blindness, A Critical Legal Analysis Of Economic Inequity, Athena D. Mutua Dec 2008

Introducing Classcrits: Rejecting Class-Blindness, A Critical Legal Analysis Of Economic Inequity, Athena D. Mutua

Journal Articles

In 2007, two workshops at the University at Buffalo launched a project bringing together legal scholars interested in exploring the relationship between law and economic inequality. This article provides an overview of the workshops’ key understandings and discussions. The essay suggests that these understandings, informed by critical legal scholarship, constituted a set of shared assumptions among the participants and informed the groups’ rejection of class blindness, a society-wide blindness to the existence and use of economic power. Discussing some of the functional similarities of gender, race and class blindness, the article argues that feminist and critical race scholars’ critiques of …


"Everybody Loves Trees": Policing American Cities Through Street Trees, Irus Braverman Jan 2008

"Everybody Loves Trees": Policing American Cities Through Street Trees, Irus Braverman

Journal Articles

Recently, municipalities have been investing large sums of money as well as much bureaucratic and professional effort into making their cities not only a more "treefull" place, but also a place that surveys, measures, regulates, and manages its trees. This article explores the transformation of the utilitarian discourse on trees, which focuses on the benefits of trees and greenery, into a normative discourse whereby trees are not only considered good but are also represented as if they are or should be loved by everybody. This transformation is not only the result of top-down governmental policies. It is also a consequence …


Drawing Back From The Abyss, Or Lessons Learned From Count Von Count, John Henry Schlegel Jan 2008

Drawing Back From The Abyss, Or Lessons Learned From Count Von Count, John Henry Schlegel

Journal Articles

No abstract provided.


Competitive Supragovernmental Regulation: How Could It Be Democratic?, Errol E. Meidinger Jan 2008

Competitive Supragovernmental Regulation: How Could It Be Democratic?, Errol E. Meidinger

Journal Articles

This paper explores the possibility that a developing form of regulatory governance is also sketching out a new form of anticipatory regulatory democracy. 'Competitive supra-governmental regulation' is largely driven by non-state actors and is therefore commonly viewed as suffering a democracy deficit. However, because it stresses broad participation, intensive deliberative procedures, responsiveness to state law and widely accepted norms, and competition among regulatory programs to achieve effective implementation and widespread public acceptance, this form of regulation appears to stand up relatively well under generally understood criteria for democratic governance. Nonetheless, a more satisfactory evaluation will require a much better understanding …


Why Is It A Crime To Stomp On A Goldfish? - Harm, Victimhood And The Structure Of Anti-Cruelty Offenses, Luis E. Chiesa Jan 2008

Why Is It A Crime To Stomp On A Goldfish? - Harm, Victimhood And The Structure Of Anti-Cruelty Offenses, Luis E. Chiesa

Journal Articles

No abstract provided.


Governing Certain Things: The Regulation Of Street Trees In Four North American Cities, Irus Braverman Jan 2008

Governing Certain Things: The Regulation Of Street Trees In Four North American Cities, Irus Braverman

Journal Articles

Most sociolegal studies of the urban street focus on the human element. By focusing on the tree, my Article offers a unique perspective on the interrelations between various actors within the public spaces of modern North American cities. Situated at the intersection of legal geography, anthropology, and Science and Technology Studies, this Article demonstrates how natural artifacts function as technologies of governance, thereby masking crucial political interventions behind a natural facade. The tensions between nature and the city, as embedded in both the construction and the regulation of street trees, provide an unusual perspective on the management of urban populations …