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Compelled Speech And Doctrinal Fluidity, David Han Jul 2022

Compelled Speech And Doctrinal Fluidity, David Han

Indiana Law Journal

Even within the messy and complicated confines of First Amendment jurisprudence, compelled speech doctrine stands out in its complexity and conceptual murkiness— a state of affairs that has only been exacerbated by the Supreme Court’s decisions in NIFLA v. Becerra and Janus v. American Federation of State, County, and Municipal Employees. This Essay observes that as the Court’s compelled speech jurisprudence has grown increasingly complex, it has also manifested a troubling degree of fluidity, where the doctrinal framework has grown so incoherent, imprecise, and unstable that it can be readily shaped by courts to plausibly justify a wide range of …


What's The Deal With Revlon?, Zachary Gubler Jan 2021

What's The Deal With Revlon?, Zachary Gubler

Indiana Law Journal

Under the Revlon doctrine, courts are to apply a higher level of scrutiny in certain takeover situations in an attempt to control potential conflicts of interest that might prejudice target shareholders. However, the doctrine has always had sufficient “play in the joints” that one might reasonably wonder whether it has much of an effect in practice on short-term shareholder returns. Additionally, in recent years, the trend in Delaware’s Revlon jurisprudence seems to be to defer to the target board as long as there are no glaring conflicts of interest. Taken together, these facts raise concern over the continued relevance of …


How To Fix Legal Scholarmush, Adam Kolber Oct 2020

How To Fix Legal Scholarmush, Adam Kolber

Indiana Law Journal

Legal scholars often fail to distinguish descriptive claims about what the law is from normative claims about what it ought to be. The distinction couldn’t be more important, yet scholars frequently mix it up, leading them to mistake legal authority for moral authority, treat current law as a justification for itself, and generally use rhetorical strategies more appropriate for legal practice than scholarship. As a result, scholars sometimes talk past each other, generating not scholarship but “scholarmush.”

In recent years, legal scholarship has been criticized as too theoretical. When it comes to normative scholarship, however, the criticism is off the …


The Fourth Amendment At Home, Thomas P. Crocker Oct 2020

The Fourth Amendment At Home, Thomas P. Crocker

Indiana Law Journal

A refuge, a domain of personal privacy, and the seat of familial life, the home holds a special place in Fourth Amendment jurisprudence. Supreme Court opinions are replete with statements affirming the special status of the home. Fourth Amendment text places special emphasis on securing protections for the home in addition to persons, papers, and effects against unwarranted government intrusion. Beyond the Fourth Amendment, the home has a unique place within constitutional structure. The home receives privacy protections in addition to sheltering other constitutional values protected by the Due Process Clause and the First Amendment. For example, under the Due …


The Kavanaugh Court And The Schechter-To-Chevron Spectrum: How The New Supreme Court Will Make The Administrative State More Democratically Accountable, Justin Walker Jul 2020

The Kavanaugh Court And The Schechter-To-Chevron Spectrum: How The New Supreme Court Will Make The Administrative State More Democratically Accountable, Justin Walker

Indiana Law Journal

In a typical year, Congress passes roughly 800 pages of law—that’s about a seveninch

stack of paper. But in the same year, federal administrative agencies promulgate

80,000 pages of regulations—which makes an eleven-foot paper pillar. This move

toward electorally unaccountable administrators deciding federal policy began in

1935, accelerated in the 1940s, and has peaked in the recent decades. Rather than

elected representatives, unelected bureaucrats increasingly make the vast majority

of the nation’s laws—a trend facilitated by the Supreme Court’s decisions in three

areas: delegation, deference, and independence.

This trend is about to be reversed. In the coming years, Congress will …


Sticks, Stones, And So-Called Judges: Why The Era Of Trump Necessitates Revisiting Presidential Influence On The Courts, Quinn W. Crowley Jan 2019

Sticks, Stones, And So-Called Judges: Why The Era Of Trump Necessitates Revisiting Presidential Influence On The Courts, Quinn W. Crowley

Indiana Law Journal

This Note will be primarily divided into three main sections. Part I of this Note will begin by discussing the importance of judicial independence in modern society and the role of elected officials in shaping the public perception of the courts. Additionally, as problems of judicial legitimacy are age-old and date back to America’s founding, Part I will include a brief discussion of an early clash between President Thomas Jefferson and the courts.

Parts II and III of this Note will seek to place President Trump’s conduct towards the judicial branch within the proper historical context. Part II examines the …


Do Corporations Have Religious Beliefs?, Jason Iuliano Jan 2015

Do Corporations Have Religious Beliefs?, Jason Iuliano

Indiana Law Journal

Despite two hundred years of jurisprudence on the topic of corporate personhood, the Supreme Court has failed to endorse a philosophically defensible theory of the corporation. In this Article, I attempt to fill that void. Drawing upon the extensive philosophical literature on personhood and group agency, I argue that corporations qualify as persons in their own right. This leads me to answer the titular question with an emphatic yes. Contrary to how it first seems, that conclusion does not warrant granting expansive constitutional rights to corporations. It actually suggests the opposite. Using the Affordable Care Act’s contraception mandate as a …


Reviving Implied Confidentiality, Woodrow Hartzog Apr 2014

Reviving Implied Confidentiality, Woodrow Hartzog

Indiana Law Journal

The law of online relationships has a significant flaw—it regularly fails to account for the possibility of an implied confidence. The established doctrine of implied confidentiality is, without explanation, almost entirely absent from online jurisprudence in environments where it has traditionally been applied offline, such as with sensitive data sets and intimate social interactions.

Courts’ abandonment of implied confidentiality in online environments should have been foreseen. The concept has not been developed enough to be consistently applied in environments such as the Internet that lack obvious physical or contextual cues of confidence. This absence is significant because implied confidentiality could …


Is The Full Faith And Credit Clause Still "Irrelevant" To Same-Sex Marriage?: Toward A Reconsideration Of The Conventional Wisdom, Steve Sanders Jan 2014

Is The Full Faith And Credit Clause Still "Irrelevant" To Same-Sex Marriage?: Toward A Reconsideration Of The Conventional Wisdom, Steve Sanders

Indiana Law Journal

Essays on the Implications of Windsor and Perry


"We The People," Constitutional Accountability, And Outsourcing Government, Kimberly N. Brown Oct 2013

"We The People," Constitutional Accountability, And Outsourcing Government, Kimberly N. Brown

Indiana Law Journal

The ubiquitous outsourcing of federal functions to private contractors, although benign in the main, raises the most fundamental of constitutional questions: What institutions and actors comprise the “federal government” itself? From Abu Ghraib to Blackwater, a string of scandals has heightened public awareness that highly sensitive federal powers and responsibilities are routinely entrusted to government contractors. At the same time, the American populace seems vaguely aware that, when it comes to ensuring accountability for errors and abuses of power, contractors occupy a special space. The fact is that myriad structural and procedural means for holding traditionally government actors accountable do …


Selectica Resets The Trigger On The Poison Pill: Where Should The Delaware Courts Go Next?, Paul H. Edelman, Randall S. Thomas Jul 2012

Selectica Resets The Trigger On The Poison Pill: Where Should The Delaware Courts Go Next?, Paul H. Edelman, Randall S. Thomas

Indiana Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Original Acquisition Of Property: From Conquest & Possession To Democracy & Equal Opportunity, Joseph William Singer Jul 2011

Original Acquisition Of Property: From Conquest & Possession To Democracy & Equal Opportunity, Joseph William Singer

Indiana Law Journal

2010 Harris Lecture, delivered April 5, 2010, Indiana University, Maurer School of Law, Bloomington, Indiana


Procedure's Ambiguity, Mark Moller Apr 2011

Procedure's Ambiguity, Mark Moller

Indiana Law Journal

By leaving the meaning of a statute—or procedural rule—undecided, ambiguous appellate decisions create space for lower courts to adopt a blend of conflicting approaches, yielding an average result that trims between competing preferences. While compromising in this way may seem to flout basic norms of good judging, this Article shows that opaque “compromise” opinions have plausible normative appeal, given premises about good interpretation often labeled “pluralist.” Judicial pluralists think courts should decide cases in ways interest groups would, hypothetically, accept. To demonstrate the pluralist appeal of opaque decisions, I develop, in turn, two related claims: First, interest groups, under the …


Frames Of Injustice: The Bias We Overlook, Adam Benforado Oct 2010

Frames Of Injustice: The Bias We Overlook, Adam Benforado

Indiana Law Journal

The Cultural Cognition Project (CCP) at Yale Law School and the Project on Law and Mind Sciences (PLMS) at Harvard Law School draw on similar research and share a similar goal of uncovering the dynamics that shape risk perceptions, policy beliefs, and attributions underlying our laws and legal theories. Nonetheless, the projects have failed to engage one another in a substantial way. This Article attempts to bridge that gap by demonstrating how the approach taken by PLMS scholars can crucially enrich CCP scholarship. As a demonstration, this Article engages the case of Scott v. Harris, 550 US. 372 (2007), the …


Clinton, Ginsburg, And Centrist Federalism, Russell A. Miller Jan 2010

Clinton, Ginsburg, And Centrist Federalism, Russell A. Miller

Indiana Law Journal

This Article examines Justice Ginsburg's overlooked federalism jurisprudence and concludes that it almost perfectly complements President Bill Clinton's New Democratic centrism, especially his pro-state federalism agenda. The Article concludes that their nuanced, "centrist" approach to federalism has two characteristics. First,t hey value the states 'governing autonomy and show respect for the state agents that realize that autonomy. Second, they credit the states as intersubjective actors engaged in the pursuit of their interests, albeit in political processes usually carried out at the federal level.


The Material Basis Of Jurisprudence, Richard A. Posner Jan 1993

The Material Basis Of Jurisprudence, Richard A. Posner

Indiana Law Journal

No abstract provided.


The Meaning Of Deserved Punishment: An Essay On Choice, Character, And Responsibility, Samuel H. Pillsbury Jul 1992

The Meaning Of Deserved Punishment: An Essay On Choice, Character, And Responsibility, Samuel H. Pillsbury

Indiana Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Sources Of Judicial Distrust Of Social Science Evidence: A Comparison Of Social Science And Jurisprudence, Constance R. Lindman Jul 1989

Sources Of Judicial Distrust Of Social Science Evidence: A Comparison Of Social Science And Jurisprudence, Constance R. Lindman

Indiana Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Independent Professional Power And The Search For A Legal Ideology With A Progressive Bite, Bryant G. Garth Apr 1987

Independent Professional Power And The Search For A Legal Ideology With A Progressive Bite, Bryant G. Garth

Indiana Law Journal

No abstract provided.


A Response To D.A.J. Richards' Defense Of Freewheeling Constitutional Adjudication, Raoul Berger Jul 1984

A Response To D.A.J. Richards' Defense Of Freewheeling Constitutional Adjudication, Raoul Berger

Indiana Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Notes On A Grand Illusion: Some Limits On The Use Of Bayesian Theory In Evidence Law, Craig R. Callen Jan 1982

Notes On A Grand Illusion: Some Limits On The Use Of Bayesian Theory In Evidence Law, Craig R. Callen

Indiana Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Government By Judiciary: John Hart Ely's "Invitation", Raoul Berger Jan 1979

Government By Judiciary: John Hart Ely's "Invitation", Raoul Berger

Indiana Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Professor Dworkin's Views On Legal Positivism, Genaro R. Carrio Jan 1979

Professor Dworkin's Views On Legal Positivism, Genaro R. Carrio

Indiana Law Journal

This article was delivered on March 15 & 16, 1979, at the Indiana University School of Law, Bloomington, as a part of the Addison C. Harris lecture series.


Constitutional Interpretivism: Its Allure And Impossibility, John Hart Ely Apr 1978

Constitutional Interpretivism: Its Allure And Impossibility, John Hart Ely

Indiana Law Journal

A shorter version of the text of this article was delivered on February 7, 1978, by Professor Ely at the Indiana University School of Law as part of the Addison C. Harris lecture series. It is an adaptation of part of a book in progress on judicial review and representative government.


Justice Story's Doctrine Of Judicial Supremacy And The Uncertain Search For A Neutral Principle In The Charles River Bridge Case, C. Lee Mangas Jan 1977

Justice Story's Doctrine Of Judicial Supremacy And The Uncertain Search For A Neutral Principle In The Charles River Bridge Case, C. Lee Mangas

Indiana Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Political Markets And Community Self-Determination: Competing Judicial Models Of Local Government Legitimacy, Frank I. Michelman Jan 1977

Political Markets And Community Self-Determination: Competing Judicial Models Of Local Government Legitimacy, Frank I. Michelman

Indiana Law Journal

This article is a significantly revised version of the Harris Lectures delivered in April, 1977 at the Indiana University School of Law of Bloomington.


Products Liability And Judicial Wealth Redistributions, Alan Schwartz Apr 1976

Products Liability And Judicial Wealth Redistributions, Alan Schwartz

Indiana Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Judicial Reasoning And Social Change, David Dittfurth Jan 1975

Judicial Reasoning And Social Change, David Dittfurth

Indiana Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Law And Today's Crisis-Situations, Thomas E. Davitt Jan 1971

Law And Today's Crisis-Situations, Thomas E. Davitt

Indiana Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Antilaw Sentiments And Their Philosophical Foundations, Edgar Bodenheimer Jan 1971

Antilaw Sentiments And Their Philosophical Foundations, Edgar Bodenheimer

Indiana Law Journal

No abstract provided.