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Global Human Rights Clinic

2022

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Full-Text Articles in Law

“All I Want Is To Be Free”, University Of Chicago Law School - Global Human Rights Clinic Jan 2022

“All I Want Is To Be Free”, University Of Chicago Law School - Global Human Rights Clinic

Global Human Rights Clinic

Statelessness — the condition of lacking citizenship or nationality in any country of the world — affects more than 10 million people globally. In the United States, conservative estimates put the number of stateless persons at over 200,000. Given that the U.S. provides citizenship to people born on the territory, nearly all stateless persons within the U.S. were born elsewhere. However, the U.S. immigration framework is silent with respect to statelessness, in effect leaving stateless people unrecognized, unprotected and invisible before the law.

As persons relegated to a life without legal status, stateless people in the United States are subject …


Captive Labor: Exploitation Of Incarcerated Workers, University Of Chicago Law School - Global Human Rights Clinic, Jennifer Turner, Mariana Olaizola Rosenblat, Nino Guruli, Claudia Flores, Sophie Desch, Katya El Tayeb, Leena Elsadek, Eric Singerman, Joseph Nunn, Monica Weisman, Genevieve Auld, Aaron Tucek, Nico Thompson-Lleras, Johnny Walker, Jennifer Turner Jan 2022

Captive Labor: Exploitation Of Incarcerated Workers, University Of Chicago Law School - Global Human Rights Clinic, Jennifer Turner, Mariana Olaizola Rosenblat, Nino Guruli, Claudia Flores, Sophie Desch, Katya El Tayeb, Leena Elsadek, Eric Singerman, Joseph Nunn, Monica Weisman, Genevieve Auld, Aaron Tucek, Nico Thompson-Lleras, Johnny Walker, Jennifer Turner

Global Human Rights Clinic

Our nation incarcerates over 1.2 million people in state and federal prisons, and two out of three of these incarcerated people are also workers. In most instances, the jobs these people in prison have look similar to those of millions of people working on the outside: They work as cooks, dishwashers, janitors, groundskeepers, barbers, painters, or plumbers; in laundries, kitchens, factories, and hospitals. They provide vital public services such as repairing roads, fighting wildfires, or clearing debris after hurricanes. They washed hospital laundry and worked in mortuary services at the height of the pandemic. They manufacture products like office furniture, …