Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Law Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Articles 1 - 16 of 16

Full-Text Articles in Law

Gender And Privacy In Cyberspace, Anita L. Allen May 2000

Gender And Privacy In Cyberspace, Anita L. Allen

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.


Some Doubts About Argument By Hypothetical, Paul H. Robinson May 2000

Some Doubts About Argument By Hypothetical, Paul H. Robinson

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

In his paper, Why the Successful Assassin Is More Wicked than the Unsuccessful One, Leo Katz "pick[s] up the gauntlet [Sandy] Kadish throws down" to offer a nonconsequentialist justification for giving significance to resulting harm and, in particular, to justify the common practice of punishing attempts less than the completed offense. In one sense, I may not be the ideal person to serve as critic. I am not one of those who, like Kadish and others, does not believe in the significance of resulting harm in assessing blameworthiness (people whom Katz calls the "luck- skeptics" but to whom I ...


The Moral Metaphysics Of Causation And Results, Stephen J. Morse Jan 2000

The Moral Metaphysics Of Causation And Results, Stephen J. Morse

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.


The Complicated Ingredients Of Wisdom And Leadership, Michael A. Fitts Jan 2000

The Complicated Ingredients Of Wisdom And Leadership, Michael A. Fitts

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.


Privacy-As-Data Control: Conceptual, Practical, And Moral Limits Of The Paradigm, Anita L. Allen Jan 2000

Privacy-As-Data Control: Conceptual, Practical, And Moral Limits Of The Paradigm, Anita L. Allen

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.


The Moral Exclusivity Of The New Civil Society, Dorothy E. Roberts Jan 2000

The Moral Exclusivity Of The New Civil Society, Dorothy E. Roberts

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.


Rationality And Responsibility, Stephen J. Morse Jan 2000

Rationality And Responsibility, Stephen J. Morse

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.


When The Rule Swallows The Exception, Claire Oakes Finkelstein Jan 2000

When The Rule Swallows The Exception, Claire Oakes Finkelstein

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.


A Liberal Theory Of Social Welfare: Fairness, Utility, And The Pareto Principle, Howard F. Chang Jan 2000

A Liberal Theory Of Social Welfare: Fairness, Utility, And The Pareto Principle, Howard F. Chang

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.


Equality And Affiliation As Bases Of Ethical Responsibility, Geoffrey C. Hazard Jr. Jan 2000

Equality And Affiliation As Bases Of Ethical Responsibility, Geoffrey C. Hazard Jr.

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.


Why The Successful Assassin Is More Wicked Than The Unseccessful One, Leo Katz Jan 2000

Why The Successful Assassin Is More Wicked Than The Unseccessful One, Leo Katz

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.


"Bad For Business": Contextual Analysis, Race Discrimination, And Fast Food, Regina Austin Jan 2000

"Bad For Business": Contextual Analysis, Race Discrimination, And Fast Food, Regina Austin

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.


The Inefficiency Of Mens Rea, Claire Oakes Finkelstein Jan 2000

The Inefficiency Of Mens Rea, Claire Oakes Finkelstein

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.


Changing Structure In The Practice Of Law, Geoffrey C. Hazard Jr. Jan 2000

Changing Structure In The Practice Of Law, Geoffrey C. Hazard Jr.

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.


The Possibility Of A Fair Paretian, Howard F. Chang Jan 2000

The Possibility Of A Fair Paretian, Howard F. Chang

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.


Positivism And The Notion Of An Offense, Claire Oakes Finkelstein Jan 2000

Positivism And The Notion Of An Offense, Claire Oakes Finkelstein

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

While the United States Supreme Court has developed an elaborate constitutional jurisprudence of criminal procedure, it has articulated few constitutional doctrines of the substantive criminal law. The asymmetry between substance and procedure seems natural given the demise of Lochner and the minimalist stance towards due process outside the area of fundamental rights. This Article, however, argues that the "positivistic" approach to defining criminal offenses stands in some tension with other basic principles, both constitutional and moral. In particular, two important constitutional guarantees depend on the notion of an offense: the presumption of innocence and the ban on double jeopardy. Under ...