Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Law Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Faculty Scholarship

Intellectual Property Law

Cyberspace

Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Law

Meatspace, The Internet, And The Cloud: How Changes In Document Storage And Transfer Can Affect Ip Rights, Sharon Sandeen Jan 2014

Meatspace, The Internet, And The Cloud: How Changes In Document Storage And Transfer Can Affect Ip Rights, Sharon Sandeen

Faculty Scholarship

This article discusses the intellectual property issues from "meatspace" to online services and the Internet. It further explores intellectual property issues from the Internet to the Cloud. Finally, it discusses the implications of cloud computing for trade secret protection.


Fencing Cyberspace: Drawing Borders In A Virtual World, Maureen A. O'Rourke Jan 1998

Fencing Cyberspace: Drawing Borders In A Virtual World, Maureen A. O'Rourke

Faculty Scholarship

In the last few years, the Internet has increasingly become a source of information even for the historically computer illiterate. The growing popularity of the Internet has been driven in large part by the World Wide Web (web). The web is a system that facilitates use of the Internet by helping users sort through the great mass of information available on it. The web uses software that allows one document to link to and access another, and so on, despite the fact that the documents may reside on different machines in physically remote locations. The dispersion of data that is …


Foucault In Cyberspace: Surveillance, Sovereignty, And Hardwired Censors, James Boyle Jan 1997

Foucault In Cyberspace: Surveillance, Sovereignty, And Hardwired Censors, James Boyle

Faculty Scholarship

This is an essay about law in cyberspace. I focus on three interdependent phenomena: a set of political and legal assumptions that I call the jurisprudence of digital libertarianism, a separate but related set of beliefs about the state's supposed inability to regulate the Internet, and a preference for technological solutions to hard legal issues on-line. I make the familiar criticism that digital libertarianism is inadequate because of its blindness towards the effects of private power, and the less familiar claim that digital libertarianism is also surprisingly blind to the state's own power in cyberspace. In fact, I argue that …