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Commentary, Critical Legal Theory In Intellectual Property And Information Law Scholarship, Cardozo Arts & Entertainment Law Journal Spring Symposium, Sonia K. Katyal, Peter Goodrich Jan 2013

Commentary, Critical Legal Theory In Intellectual Property And Information Law Scholarship, Cardozo Arts & Entertainment Law Journal Spring Symposium, Sonia K. Katyal, Peter Goodrich

Faculty Scholarship

The very definition and scope of CLS (critical legal studies) is itself subject to debate. Some scholars characterize CLS as scholarship that employs a particular methodology—more of a “means” than an “end.” On the other hand, some scholars contend that CLS scholarship demonstrates a collective commitment to a political end goal—an emancipation of sorts —through the identification of, and resistance to, exploitative power structures that are reinforced through law and legal institutions. After a brief golden age, CLS scholarship was infamously marginalized in legal academia and its sub-disciplines. But CLS themes now appear to be making a resurgence—at least in …


Critical Legal Studies In Intellectual Property And Information Law Scholarship, (Symposium), Sonia K. Katyal, Peter Goodrich, Rebecca L. Tushnet Jan 2013

Critical Legal Studies In Intellectual Property And Information Law Scholarship, (Symposium), Sonia K. Katyal, Peter Goodrich, Rebecca L. Tushnet

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Trademark Cosmopolitanism, Sonia K. Katyal Jan 2013

Trademark Cosmopolitanism, Sonia K. Katyal

Faculty Scholarship

The world of global trademarks can be characterized in terms of three major shifts: first, a shift from national to global branding strategies; second, a shift from national and regional systems to harmonized international regimes governing trademark law; and third, a concurrent shift from local to transnational social movements that challenge branding and other corporate practices. The rise of transnational brands brings with it an attendant series of legal shifts in trademark law. Long considered the stepchild of intellectual property law, today, trademark law has morphed into a powerful global legal phenomenon, revealing a foundational shift from national and regional …


Must Licenses Be Contracts? Consent And Notice In Intellectual Property, Mark R. Patterson Jan 2012

Must Licenses Be Contracts? Consent And Notice In Intellectual Property, Mark R. Patterson

Faculty Scholarship

Intellectual property owners often seek to provide access to their patented or copyrighted works while at the same time imposing restrictions on that access. One example of this approach is “field-of-use” licensing in patent law, which permits licensees to use the patented invention but only in certain ways. Another is open-source licensing in copyright law, where copyright owners typically require licensees that incorporate open-source software in other products to license those other products on an open-source basis as well. Surprisingly, though, the legal requirements for granting restricted access are unclear. The source of the lack of clarity is the ill-defined …


Between Semiotic Democracy And Disobedience: Two Views Of Branding, Culture And Intellectualproperty, Sonia K. Katyal Jan 2012

Between Semiotic Democracy And Disobedience: Two Views Of Branding, Culture And Intellectualproperty, Sonia K. Katyal

Faculty Scholarship

Even though most scholars and judges treat intellectual property law as a predominantly content-neutral phenomenon, trademark law contains a statutory provision, section 2(a), that provides for the cancellation of marks that are “disparaging,” “immoral,” or “scandalous.” This provision has raised intrinsically powerful constitutional concerns, which invariably affect two central metaphors that are at war within trademark law: the marketplace of goods, which premises itself on the fixedness of intellectual properties, and the marketplace of ideas, which is premised on the very fluidity of language itself. Since the architecture of trademark law focuses only on how marks communicate information about a …


Patent Settlements, Risk, And Competition, Mark R. Patterson Jan 2011

Patent Settlements, Risk, And Competition, Mark R. Patterson

Faculty Scholarship

PowerPoint presentation delivered at the session, Patent Settlements: The Issues Beyond the "Reverse Payment" Cases at the ABA 59th Annual Antitrust Spring Meeting, March 30, 2011.


Stealth Marketing And Antibranding: The Love That Dare Not Speak Its Name , Sonia K. Katyal Jan 2010

Stealth Marketing And Antibranding: The Love That Dare Not Speak Its Name , Sonia K. Katyal

Faculty Scholarship

A difficult set of legal issues stem from the crossover between stealth marketing and user generated content in both real and digital space. Today, branding opportunities can be cloaked within ordinary noncommercial expression, as corporate sponsorship extends further and further toward resembling user generated content, making it difficult to discern when content is sponsored and when it is not. Since many forms of stealth marketing often takes place within the nontraditional channels that antibranding occupies (public space, websites, and other forms of media and content), it becomes more difficult then for the consumer to distinguish between the brand and the …


Trademark Intersectionality , Sonia K. Katyal Jan 2009

Trademark Intersectionality , Sonia K. Katyal

Faculty Scholarship

Even though most scholars and judges treat intellectual property law as a predominantly content neutral phenomenon, trademark law contains a statutory provision, Section 2(a) that provides for the cancellation of marks that are “disparaging,” “immoral,” or “scandalous,” a provision that has raised intrinsically powerful constitutional concerns. The constitutional tensions surrounding Section 2(a), invariably, affect two central metaphors that are at war within trademark law: the marketplace of goods, which premises itself on the fixedness of intellectual properties, and the marketplace of ideas, which is premised on the very fluidity of language itself. Since the architecture of trademark law focuses only …


Filtering, Piracy Surveillance And Disobedience , Sonia K. Katyal Jan 2008

Filtering, Piracy Surveillance And Disobedience , Sonia K. Katyal

Faculty Scholarship

There has always been a cyclical relationship between the prevention of piracy and the protection of civil liberties. While civil liberties advocates previously warned about the aggressive nature of copyright protection initiatives, more recently, a number of major players in the music industry have eventually ceded to less direct forms of control over consumer behavior. As more aggressive forms of consumer control, like litigation, have receded, we have also seen a rise in more passive forms of consumer surveillance. Moreover, even as technology has developed more perfect means for filtering and surveillance over online piracy, a number of major players …


Introduction, Joel R. Reidenberg Jan 2007

Introduction, Joel R. Reidenberg

Faculty Scholarship

As a leader in the publication of legal scholarship, the Fordham Intellectual Property, Media and Entertainment Law Journal sought the insights of internationally renowned scholars on critical problems in intellectual property law. In this focused issue, five top scholars tackle timely questions.


Contractual Expansion Of The Scope Of Patent Infringement Through Field-Of-Use Licensing, Mark R. Patterson Jan 2007

Contractual Expansion Of The Scope Of Patent Infringement Through Field-Of-Use Licensing, Mark R. Patterson

Faculty Scholarship

Patentees sometimes license their inventions through field-of-use licenses, which permit licensees to use the inventions, but only in specified ways. Field-of-use licensing is often procompetitive, because the ability to provide different licensing terms for different users can encourage broader licensing of inventions. But in recent United States cases, the Federal Circuit Court of Appeals and lower courts have upheld field-of-use licenses prohibiting activities that licensees would otherwise have been permitted by patent law, such as the repair and resale of patented products. The recent cases rely on the Federal Circuit's decision in Mallinckrodt, Inc. v. Medipart, Inc., where the court …


The Rule Of Intellectual Property Law In The Internet Economy, Joel R. Reidenberg Jan 2007

The Rule Of Intellectual Property Law In The Internet Economy, Joel R. Reidenberg

Faculty Scholarship

This article argues that the technological attacks on intellectual property are a movement against democratically chosen intellectual property rules. They form a basic challenge to the rule of law and to the control of the rules wired into the network. In making this argument, the Article first maintains that intellectual property rights have an important public function in democracy in that they mark political, economic, and social boundaries. Next, the Article shows that the public law, as enacted by governments, has reallocated intellectual property rights to adapt to the information economy. While many aspects of this new allocation of rights …


Performance, Property, And The Slashing Of Gender In Fan Fiction , Sonia K. Katyal Jan 2006

Performance, Property, And The Slashing Of Gender In Fan Fiction , Sonia K. Katyal

Faculty Scholarship

Today, it is no secret that the regime of copyright law, once an often-overlooked footnote to our legal system of property, now occupies a central position in modern debates surrounding the relationship between freedom of expression, language, and ownership. Curiously, however, while contemporary scholarship on copyright now embraces a wide range of political and economic approaches, it has often failed to consider how intellectual property law - as it is owned, constituted, created, and enforced - both benefits and disadvantages segments of the population in divergent ways. This absence is both vexing and fascinating. While issues of distributive justice have …


Le Droit Et Les Reseaux Internationaux D'Information, Joel R. Reidenberg Feb 2003

Le Droit Et Les Reseaux Internationaux D'Information, Joel R. Reidenberg

Faculty Scholarship

Travaux pour obtenir le grade de Docteur De L'Universite Paris I. Discipline: Droit. Sujet des publications: Le Droit Et Les Reseaux Internationaux D'Information


New Surveillance, The , Sonia K. Katyal Jan 2003

New Surveillance, The , Sonia K. Katyal

Faculty Scholarship

A few years ago, it was fanciful to imagine a world where intellectual property owners - such as record companies, software owners, and publishers - were capable of invading the most sacred areas of the home in order to track, deter, and control uses of their products. Yet, today, strategies of copyright enforcement have rapidly multiplied, each strategy more invasive than the last. This new surveillance exposes the paradoxical nature of the Internet: It offers both the consumer and creator a seemingly endless capacity for human expression - a virtual marketplace of ideas - alongside an insurmountable array of capacities …


Antitrust And The Costs Of Standard-Setting: A Commentary On Teece & (And) Sherry Symposium: The Interface Between Intellectual Property Law And Antitrust Law: Commentary, Mark R. Patterson Jan 2002

Antitrust And The Costs Of Standard-Setting: A Commentary On Teece & (And) Sherry Symposium: The Interface Between Intellectual Property Law And Antitrust Law: Commentary, Mark R. Patterson

Faculty Scholarship

The creation of an industry standard is a process that has much in common with the creation of a patented invention. Indeed, if standards are not patentable, it is only because of certain doctrinal peculiarities of patent law. It is therefore important to preserve the incentives for organizations to incur the costs of standard-setting activity, so that society may gain the benefits of the resulting standards. The law can preserve those incentives by treating the contributions of industry standards as distinct from those of inventions that are incorporated in them. More specifically, antitrust law should ensure that the patentees of …


Inventions, Industry Standards, And Intellectual Property, Mark R. Patterson Jan 2002

Inventions, Industry Standards, And Intellectual Property, Mark R. Patterson

Faculty Scholarship

When an industry standard incorporates a patented invention, the demand for products that comply with the standard has two components. Some of the demand may be for the inherent technical advantages of the invention; the patentee is generally entitled to revenues attributable to this demand. But some of the demand is for the benefits of standardization, such as interoperability, and the patentee is not entitled to revenues attributable to this demand. From this point, the article draws two conclusions. First, the amounts to which a patentee is entitled, either in litigation or in licensing negotiations, should be calculated by determining …


When Is Property Intellectual: The Leveraging Problem Essays, Mark R. Patterson Jan 1999

When Is Property Intellectual: The Leveraging Problem Essays, Mark R. Patterson

Faculty Scholarship

Patents and copyrights protect inventions and expression; they do not protect products. This distinction, I argue in this essay, is a key to the antitrust problem of the "leveraging" of intellectual property. In a typical leveraging case, the manufacturer of a durable good, like a copier or computer, refuses to sell replacement parts for its equipment unless the purchaser also hires the manufacturer to service the equipment. Such a practice can be illegal under antitrust law, but when the leveraging products-in this example, replacement parts-are protected by patent or copyright, the manufacturer will often claim that the leveraging is a …


Introduction To Keynote Address: Symposium: The First Amendment And The Media: Convergence--Necessary, Evil, Or Both? The Legal, Economic, And Cultural Impacts Of Mega Media Mergers, Joel R. Reidenberg Jan 1998

Introduction To Keynote Address: Symposium: The First Amendment And The Media: Convergence--Necessary, Evil, Or Both? The Legal, Economic, And Cultural Impacts Of Mega Media Mergers, Joel R. Reidenberg

Faculty Scholarship

It is my pleasure today to introduce our keynote speaker, Professor Larry Lessig. Professor Lessig is the Jack and Lillian Berkman Professor of Entrepreneurial Legal Studies at Harvard Law School and is a renowned scholar in intellectual property, constitutional, Internet, and new media law. Indeed, the last time Professor Lessig spoke here at Fordham, he was focusing on his pioneering work addressing fidelity in constitutional interpretation. Of course, not the sort of fidelity that the Senate is debating this afternoon.


International Copyright: An Unorthodox Analysis American Association Of Law Schools' Intellectual Property Section's Symposium On Compliance With The Trips Agreement, Hugh C. Hansen Jan 1996

International Copyright: An Unorthodox Analysis American Association Of Law Schools' Intellectual Property Section's Symposium On Compliance With The Trips Agreement, Hugh C. Hansen

Faculty Scholarship

Professor Hansen reviews the development of copyright from its traditional domestic orientation to the modern emphasis on globalization and harmonization. His commentary analogizes modem trends in international copyright to religious equivalents. He notes that the current players include a "secular priesthood" (the traditional copyright bar and academics), "agnostics and atheists" (newer academics and lawyers, particularly those concerned with technology and the culture of the public domain) and "missionaries" (whose task it is to increase copyright protection around the world and who are primarily driven by trade considerations). The copyright "crusade" has been driven by this last group. The author compares …


Product Definition, Product Information, And Market Power: Kodak In Perspective, Mark R. Patterson Jan 1994

Product Definition, Product Information, And Market Power: Kodak In Perspective, Mark R. Patterson

Faculty Scholarship

In Eastman Kodak Co. v. Image Technical Services, Inc., product information, market costs, market information the United States Supreme Court held that market power sufficient to impose an illegal tying arrangement can, at least in theory, derive from buyers' uncertainty regarding a product's costs and quality. Although commentators disagree on the implications of the Kodak decision, all seem to agree that the opinion's emphasis on product information costs is a departure from previously accepted economic analysis of antitrust law. In this Article, Mark R. Patterson argues that the Kodak decision is, in fact, economically reasonable, incorporating into antitrust law previously …


Gray Market Goods: A Lighter Shade Of Black Symposium: The Controversy Over The Importation Of Gray Market Goods: Is A Resolution Forthcoming, Hugh C. Hansen Jan 1987

Gray Market Goods: A Lighter Shade Of Black Symposium: The Controversy Over The Importation Of Gray Market Goods: Is A Resolution Forthcoming, Hugh C. Hansen

Faculty Scholarship

If a street vendor offers a famous brand-name product for a substantially lower price than one would expect, the average consumer's initial reaction might be that the product had been stolen or was "hot" - a product of the black market. While such discounted goods might indeed be stolen, sophisticated consumers have come to expect similar discounts in stores and mail-order houses throughout the country on goods not from the black market but rather from the "gray market." These products, naturally enough, are called "gray market goods" or simply "gray goods." Gray goods are brand-name products manufactured abroad which bear …


Self-Love And The Judicial Power To Appoint A Special Prosecutor Symposium On Special Prosecutions And The Role Of The Independent Counsel, James A. Cohen Jan 1987

Self-Love And The Judicial Power To Appoint A Special Prosecutor Symposium On Special Prosecutions And The Role Of The Independent Counsel, James A. Cohen

Faculty Scholarship

Judicial appointment of private attorneys as special prosecutors has occurred and is permitted to occur in a variety of contexts other than when the executive branch is faced with a potential or actual conflict of interest. Until recently, the Second Circuit Court of Appeals and, of course, district courts within the Second Circuit, have interpreted Rule 42(b) of the Federal Rules of Criminal Procedure to permit judicial appointment of a private attorney to prosecute conduct allegedly violative of a court order as criminal contempt. Courts have been most active in appointing private attorneys as special prosecutors in cases involving counterfeit …


U.S. Software Protection: Problems Of Trade Secret Estoppel Under International And Brazilian Technology Transfer Regimes Note, Joel R. Reidenberg Jan 1984

U.S. Software Protection: Problems Of Trade Secret Estoppel Under International And Brazilian Technology Transfer Regimes Note, Joel R. Reidenberg

Faculty Scholarship

This note describes the fundamental aspects of software protection and applies the requisites of U.S. trade secret protection to software. After explaining how the UNCTAD and Brazilian transfer of technology regimes apply to software licensing arrangements, this note argues that software distribution under these regimes estops U.S. trade secret protection by defeating the requisites of secrecy and competitive advantage. Specifically, the effects of the UNCTAD Draft International Code of Conduct on the Transfer of Technology (UNCTAD Code) and the Brazilian technology transfer regulations are analyzed to demonstrate the difficulties posed by legal regimes being considered and already in force in …