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Articles 1 - 11 of 11

Full-Text Articles in Law

The Age Of Constitutions In The Americas, M C. Mirow Jan 2014

The Age Of Constitutions In The Americas, M C. Mirow

Faculty Publications

The late eighteenth and nineteenth centuries have been aptly called the “Age of Codifications.” The same period was also the Age of Constitutions. Although a great deal is known about the migration of prenational and transnational legal sources and ideas that led to national codes of civil and criminal law in Europe and the Americas, much less is known about similar processes on the constitutional level. Constitutional historians have been more parochial than their private law counterparts, most likely because of the relationship between constitutions and nations. In the light of independence, nations immediately needed constitutions to solidify gains and ...


Order In The Desert: Law Abiding Behavior At Burning Man, Manuel A. Gómez Jan 2013

Order In The Desert: Law Abiding Behavior At Burning Man, Manuel A. Gómez

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Assessing The African Union Concerns About Article 16 Of The Rome State Of The International Criminal Court, Charles Chernor Jalloh, Dapo Akande, Max Du Plessis Jan 2011

Assessing The African Union Concerns About Article 16 Of The Rome State Of The International Criminal Court, Charles Chernor Jalloh, Dapo Akande, Max Du Plessis

Faculty Publications

This article assesses the African Union’s (AU) concerns about Article 16 of the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court (ICC). It seeks to articulate a clearer picture of the law and politics of deferrals within the context of the AU’s repeated calls to the United Nations Security Council (UNSC, or the Council) to invoke Article 16 to suspend the processes initiated by the ICC against President Omar Al Bashir of Sudan. The UNSC’s failure to accede to the AU request led African States to formally withhold cooperation from the ICC in respect to the arrest and ...


Substantial Limitations: Reflections On The Adaaa, Kerri Lynn Stone Jan 2011

Substantial Limitations: Reflections On The Adaaa, Kerri Lynn Stone

Faculty Publications

This Article advocates several ways to reform the American with Disabilities Act Amendments Act of 2008 (ADAAA) and its jurisprudence. It begins with the premise that the “otherwise qualified,” “reasonable accommodation,” and “undue hardship” analyses are questions that call for a focus on, respectively, the plaintiff at issue, the accommodation at issue, and the employer at issue. The article calls for the abolition of the need to demonstrate a major life activity limitation required for coverage under the statute in accommodation cases, noting that this has already effectively occurred in the context of the rest of the ADA’s antidiscrimination ...


The Irrepressible Myth Of Klein, Howard M. Wasserman Jan 2010

The Irrepressible Myth Of Klein, Howard M. Wasserman

Faculty Publications

The Reconstruction-era case of United States v. Klein remains the object of a “cult” among commentators and advocates, who see it as a powerful separation of powers precedent. In fact, Klein is a myth—actually two related myths. One is that it is opaque and meaninglessly indeterminate because, given its confusing and disjointed language, its precise doctrinal contours are indecipherable; the other is that Klein is vigorous precedent, likely to be used by a court to invalidate likely federal legislation. Close analysis of Klein, its progeny, and past scholarship uncovers three identifiable core limitations on congressional control over the workings ...


The Contribution Of The Special Court For Sierra Leone To The Development Of International Law, Charles Chernor Jalloh Jan 2007

The Contribution Of The Special Court For Sierra Leone To The Development Of International Law, Charles Chernor Jalloh

Faculty Publications

This article is the first major study examining whether the Special Court for Sierra Leone (SCSL) has made, or is making, any contribution to the development of international law. The author concludes that it has. In this vein, he analyzes the creation of the Defence Office, the Legacy Phase Working Group and the Outreach Section to show that some of the structural novelties introduced through SCSL practice have proven to be worthy of replication within other international criminal courts. Taking as an example the controversy regarding the United Nations Security Council’s power to create ad hoc international criminal tribunals ...


Latcrit Vi, Outsider Jurisprudence And Looking Beyond Imagined Borders, Ediberto Román Jan 2003

Latcrit Vi, Outsider Jurisprudence And Looking Beyond Imagined Borders, Ediberto Román

Faculty Publications

The Sixth Annual LatCrit Conference (LatCrit VI) titled "Latinas/os and the Americas: Centering North-South Frameworks in LatCrit Theory," was the latest installment of the leading progressive scholarly movement addressing nonwhite critical jurisprudence.3 The goals of the conference were to explore the ties that bind Latinas/os residing in the United States to their homeland's societies and cultures, and to examine the impact of globalization on critical jurisprudential discourse.4 The conference was attended predominately by straight and gay law professors of color, including Latinas/os, African Americans, Asian Americans, and indigenous persons, most of whom describe themselves ...


Tyrannous Lex, Thomas E. Baker Jan 1997

Tyrannous Lex, Thomas E. Baker

Faculty Publications

Professor Baker presents a fundamentally unique question. Including all of the legal opinions, statutes and administrative rules, how much law do we have? Is there way to calculate a “Gross Legal Product” for the United States and what effect does this “GLP” have on the U.S. economy? What about all of the secondary legal sources? What do they add, if anything, to our ability to understand all of the law that is constantly being produced? All these and more are the subject of Professor Baker’s article.


Statutory Interpretation In Securities Jurisprudence: A Failure Of Textualism, Ediberto Román Jan 1996

Statutory Interpretation In Securities Jurisprudence: A Failure Of Textualism, Ediberto Román

Faculty Publications

This Article critiques the development of textualist theory in securities jurisprudence and analyzes the Central Bank decision as an example of the defects inherent in the application of a textualist approach. It demonstrates how the development of textualist securities jurisprudence stemmed from decisions that casually rejected precedent and mischaracterized existing law, thereby resulting in a distortion of the legislature’s intent. An analysis of the Securities Exchange Act demonstrates how the Central Bank Court’s approach towards statutory interpretation led to its failure to analyze other relevant Exchange Act provisions, including the most relevant provision – Section 20(a). The first ...


The Inherent Power To Impose Sanctions: How A Federal Judge Is Like An 800-Pound Gorilla, Thomas E. Baker Jan 1994

The Inherent Power To Impose Sanctions: How A Federal Judge Is Like An 800-Pound Gorilla, Thomas E. Baker

Faculty Publications

Inherent sanctions, like Rule 11 sanctions, may be imposed against any person responsible for wrongdoing, regardless of whether that person is a litigant or an attorney. Sanctionable wrongdoing includes pre litigation misconduct, as well as abuses of process that occur beyond the courtroom, such as the willful disobedience of an otherwise valid court order, so long as the court affords a violation due process before imposing sanctions. In addition to Rule 11's function as a deterrent, inherent sanctions further the goals of compensation and punishment.


The Impropriety Of Expert Witness Testimony On The Law, Thomas E. Baker Jan 1992

The Impropriety Of Expert Witness Testimony On The Law, Thomas E. Baker

Faculty Publications

Professor Baker weighs in on a new trend of allowing expert opinion on the status of the law. He begins with a brief history of lay and expert opinion testimony and continues with an analysis of Rule 702 of the Federal Rules of Evidence before concluding that expert opinion on the law simply has no place in federal practice.