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Full-Text Articles in Law

Brougham’S Ghost, Michael S. Ariens Jan 2015

Brougham’S Ghost, Michael S. Ariens

Faculty Articles

In defending Queen Caroline in the House of Lords, Henry Brougham declared, “[a]n advocate, by the sacred duty of his connection with his client, knows, in the discharge of that office, but one person in the world, that client and none other.” Brougham’s ethic of advocacy has been cited repeatedly as stating the American lawyer’s duty of zealous representation of a client. It has often been called the “classic statement” of zealous representation and representing the “traditional view of the lawyer’s role.”

This essay challenges these conclusions. Brougham’s rhetoric was neither a classic statement of the duty of loyalty to …


Governmental Power Versus Individual Liberty, Vincent R. Johnson Jan 2015

Governmental Power Versus Individual Liberty, Vincent R. Johnson

Faculty Articles

Father, Son, and Constitution by Alexander Wohl is a major contribution to legal scholarship. This dual biography focuses on two public figures, each of whom played a leading role in addressing the most challenging legal questions of their day. The subjects of the book are Supreme Court Justice Tom C. Clark and his son Ramsey Clark, the most liberal attorney general in American history. The Clarks’ stories are told against a backdrop of the continuing American struggle to find the proper balance between governmental power and individual liberty.

The public careers of Tom and Ramsey Clark were largely sequential, but …


The Texas Supreme Court: A Narrative History, 1836–1986 (Book Review), Michael S. Ariens Jan 2014

The Texas Supreme Court: A Narrative History, 1836–1986 (Book Review), Michael S. Ariens

Faculty Articles

The historical material and resources available for American legal historians is both too much and too little. Hundreds of published case opinions became thousands of opinions by the end of the 1820s, leading lawyers to conclude that no one could know the entirety of the law. Yet this cascade of information is also too little, because the work of treatise writers and magazine editors of the time was ruthlessly focused on then-existing legal concerns.

For these reasons, James L. Haley works within difficult strictures in his book, The Texas Supreme Court: A Narrative History, 1836–1986. Because his story is about …


A Death At Crooked Creek: The Case Of The Cowboy, The Cigarmaker, And The Love Letter, By Marianne Wesson (Book Review), Michael S. Ariens Jan 2014

A Death At Crooked Creek: The Case Of The Cowboy, The Cigarmaker, And The Love Letter, By Marianne Wesson (Book Review), Michael S. Ariens

Faculty Articles

Marianne Wesson’s A Death at Crooked Creek tells the story of one of the most intriguing mysteries in American legal history. For evidence teachers, and possibly even law students, Mutual Life Ins. Co. v. Hillmon is a classic nineteenth century mystery story. The case raises the question: Was the deceased John W. Hillmon, who had recently taken out the extraordinary sum of $25,000 in life insurance, or was it Frederick Adolph Walters, an itinerant who had left Iowa a year earlier?

In addition to teaching at the University of Colorado School of Law, Wesson is the author of three mystery …


Father, Son, And Constitution: How Justice Tom Clark And Attorney General Ramsey Clark Shaped American Democracy, By Alexander Wohl (Book Review), Vincent R. Johnson Jan 2014

Father, Son, And Constitution: How Justice Tom Clark And Attorney General Ramsey Clark Shaped American Democracy, By Alexander Wohl (Book Review), Vincent R. Johnson

Faculty Articles

In Father, Son, and Constitution, Alexander Wohl brings to life two major figures of American law: Tom C. Clark and his son, Ramsey Clark. The story focuses primarily on the middle third of the twentieth century and the many heated constitutional challenges that arose during that era.

With an engaging literary style, Wohl perceptively examines not merely the lives and careers of Tom and Ramsey Clark, but the key roles they played in the issues of their day. The story proceeds from Pearl Harbor and World War II, to the Cold War, to desegregation, to the problems that beset President …


Lost And Found: David Hoffman And The History Of American Legal Ethics, Michael S. Ariens Jan 2014

Lost And Found: David Hoffman And The History Of American Legal Ethics, Michael S. Ariens

Faculty Articles

David Hoffman was a successful Baltimore lawyer who wrote the first study of American

law in 1817 and authored the first maxims of American legal ethics. Yet for more than a century after his death, Hoffman was a forgotten figure to American lawyers. Beginning in the late 1970s, Hoffman was re-discovered, and his writings on legal ethics have been favorably cited.

How and why was Hoffman “lost” to American law for over a century, and why he was “found”? Hoffman was lost to history because his view of ethics was premised on republican virtue, specifically the concept of honor. A …


The Agony Of Modern Legal Ethics, 1970–1985, Michael S. Ariens Jan 2014

The Agony Of Modern Legal Ethics, 1970–1985, Michael S. Ariens

Faculty Articles

When the American Bar Association (ABA) adopted its Code of Professional Responsibility at its annual meeting in August 1969, the American legal profession was a publicly respected and economically vibrant body. Lawyers, though always more feared than loved, became increasingly important in post-World War II America. The demand for their services exploded for a quarter-century, and lawyers assumed an increased role in the economic and political life of the United States. During the 1950s and early 1960s, the Cold War led American lawyers and other public figures to re-emphasize the rule of law as defining the difference between the United …


Teaching American Legal History Through Storytelling, Michael S. Ariens Jan 2013

Teaching American Legal History Through Storytelling, Michael S. Ariens

Faculty Articles

Distinct from facts and truths, the power of storytelling can serve as a method of teaching American Legal History. A course in American Legal History can facilitate discussion into whether the rule of law has been the rule or exception in the history of American law. Integral to this overarching story are three storylines that surface throughout the course: the development of law in American political history; the ideological underpinnings of legal doctrine development; and the rise and decline of different approaches to legal thought and their effect on legal education.

The course begins with a chronological overview of the …


Inside The Castle: Law And Family In 20th Century America, By Joanna L. Grossman And Lawrence M. Friedman (Book Review), Michael S. Ariens Jan 2013

Inside The Castle: Law And Family In 20th Century America, By Joanna L. Grossman And Lawrence M. Friedman (Book Review), Michael S. Ariens

Faculty Articles

Inside the Castle: Law and Family in 20th Century America, by Joanna L. Grossman and Lawrence M. Friedman, is an entertaining and occasionally frustrating history. In the book’s introduction, the authors offer two big ideas. Their first idea promotes the instrumental explanation of law, and the second idea is the rise in the last part of the twentieth century of what the authors call “individualized marriage.”

Both these ideas have been long promoted by Lawrence M. Friedman, one of the nation’s foremost legal historians, and in many respects, the evidence adduced by the authors confirms both big ideas. Grossman and …


The Storm Between The Quiet: Tumult In The Texas Supreme Court, 1911-21, Michael S. Ariens Jan 2007

The Storm Between The Quiet: Tumult In The Texas Supreme Court, 1911-21, Michael S. Ariens

Faculty Articles

The Texas Supreme Court from 1911–1921 is best known not for the law it made or the opinions it wrote, but for its failure to decide cases. Although the supreme court’s difficulty in clearing its docket existed before 1911, the number of outstanding cases exploded during the second decade of the twentieth century.

Arguably, the issue of statewide prohibition and the divergent views held on that issue by members of the Texas Supreme Court was the driving force behind the disharmony and dysfunctionality of the court during this decade. Statewide prohibition explains why elections of candidates to the court were …


An Essay On The Tort Of Negligent Infliction Of Emotional Distress In Texas: Stop Saying It Does Not Exist, Charles E. Cantú Jan 2002

An Essay On The Tort Of Negligent Infliction Of Emotional Distress In Texas: Stop Saying It Does Not Exist, Charles E. Cantú

Faculty Articles

The injury of emotional distress is an interesting tort, which has long perplexed the Anglo-American system of jurisprudence. While, originally, allegations of this kind did not constitute a cause of action, today, there is no question that an injured plaintiff may recover for the infliction of emotional distress. The majority and minority positions differ now only on what must be alleged and proved.

Texas was the first jurisdiction in the United States to allow recovery for mental anguish. However, in 1993 in the case of Boyles v. Kerr, the Texas Supreme Court appeared to depart from the majority view when …


The Diminishing Sphere Of The Cooperative Virtues In American Law And Society, Ana M. Novoa Jan 1999

The Diminishing Sphere Of The Cooperative Virtues In American Law And Society, Ana M. Novoa

Faculty Articles

Exploration of destructive developments in American law and society show that family law is completely askew. Although family law deals with the most intimate and basic personal relationships, it applies a legal process based on autonomous individual public and private economic rights to those intimate relational realities. It is a hallowed expression of male virtues and a paradigmatic example of the use of the law to protect vested interests and shape society, rather than a reflection of reality.

The split between the private/family/female and the public/business/male spheres of the nineteenth century created the separation of competitive attributes, virtues, and vices …


A Short History Of Hearsay Reform, With Particular Reference To Hoffman V. Palmer, Eddie Morgan And Jerry Frank, Michael S. Ariens Jan 1995

A Short History Of Hearsay Reform, With Particular Reference To Hoffman V. Palmer, Eddie Morgan And Jerry Frank, Michael S. Ariens

Faculty Articles

Much of the history of the American law of evidence, including its most contentious issue, hearsay, is the story of stasis and reform. The case of Hoffman v. Palmer represents one of few cases concerning hearsay known by name, and illustrates that “false” evidence has often been used to caution against efforts proclaiming “radical reform” of the law of evidence.

In this case involving a collision between a car and a train, the critical question was: Is the defendant railroad permitted to introduce into evidence the transcript of a question and answer session made two days after the accident between …


Constitutional Law And The Myth Of The Great Judge, Michael S. Ariens Jan 1993

Constitutional Law And The Myth Of The Great Judge, Michael S. Ariens

Faculty Articles

One of the enduring myths of American history, including constitutional history, is that of the “Great Man” or “Great Woman.” The idea is that, to understand the history of America, one needs to understand the impact made by Great Men and Women whose actions affected the course of history. In political history, one assays the development of the United States through the lives of great Americans, from the “Founders” to Abraham Lincoln to John F. Kennedy. Similarly, in constitutional history, the story is told through key figures, the “Great Judges,” from John Marshall to Oliver Wendell Holmes to Earl Warren. …


Modern Legal Times: Making A Professional Legal Culture, Michael S. Ariens Jan 1992

Modern Legal Times: Making A Professional Legal Culture, Michael S. Ariens

Faculty Articles

Lawyers’ belief in their professionalism was fostered by the creation and development of modern legal institutions. Law schools, bar associations, organizations like the American Law Institute, as well as the system of legal directories, the regional case reporter system, and continuing legal education groups all contributed greatly to the making of a distinctly professional culture of law in America. These institutions prospered in part because of their ideological fit with the professionalizing ethos embodied in Christopher Columbus Langdell’s statement that “law is a science.”

Legal institutions, then, must be evaluated through the ideological lens which encouraged and fostered the notion …


Evidence Of Religion And The Religion Of Evidence, Michael S. Ariens Jan 1992

Evidence Of Religion And The Religion Of Evidence, Michael S. Ariens

Faculty Articles

When testimony about the religiosity of a victim is elicited, a jury will likely become aware of the religious affiliation of the victim. Any revelation to a jury of the religiosity of a victim can be an aid to the jury in assessing the punishment to be given to the defendant, since being religious and talking with people about religion is deemed a communal good. However, prescribing a harsher punishment to a defendant because of the religious affiliation of a victim is a form of religious discrimination which is unconstitutional. In light of this inherent difficulty of evidence of religion, …


The Law Of Evidence And The Idea Of Progress, Michael S. Ariens Jan 1992

The Law Of Evidence And The Idea Of Progress, Michael S. Ariens

Faculty Articles

To ask the question, “Does evidence law matter?,” is often to assume that some sets or groups of people believe it is important while others are challenging that view. However, another assumption regarding the nature of this question is possible—that the question is asked because legal academics believe that evidence law both does and does not matter, and that those academics also believe that these are irreconcilable beliefs. What is of particular interest is how legal academics reached this point and why they believe that evidence law both does and does not matter.

Consideration of these aspects of evidence law …


On The Road Of Good Intentions: Justice Brennan And The Religion Clauses, Michael S. Ariens Jan 1991

On The Road Of Good Intentions: Justice Brennan And The Religion Clauses, Michael S. Ariens

Faculty Articles

Associate Supreme Court Justice William J. Brennan took the oath of office on October 16, 1956. At the time of Justice Brennan’s appointment to the Supreme Court, the Court had decided only a few cases involving the religion clauses of the first amendment, and judicial interpretation of the religion clauses had been sparing.

In the thirty-four years of Justice Brennan’s tenure, the Court worked several revolutions in religion clause jurisprudence—revolutions guided by a sense of the needs of a changing society. Justice Brennan was one of several architects of a new order in establishment clause interpretation, and was the architect …


Teaching Transformative Jurisprudence (Film Review), Vincent R. Johnson Jan 1991

Teaching Transformative Jurisprudence (Film Review), Vincent R. Johnson

Faculty Articles

The Road to Brown is a film that deals with the transformative judicial ruling of Brown v. Board of Education. Many regard this case as the most important holding ever made by a United States court. The Road to Brown offers law professors a superb vehicle for bringing to the classroom the attention to persons, sense of history, and focus on litigation strategy that a great decision demands.

The Road to Brown provides a rich socio-legal-historical perspective on the events that culminated in the 1945 Supreme Court ruling barring racial segregation in public elementary schools. The program blends together photographs, …


Dutiful Justice (Book Review), Michael S. Ariens Jan 1991

Dutiful Justice (Book Review), Michael S. Ariens

Faculty Articles

Sheldon Novick’s biography, Honorable Justice: The Life of Oliver Wendell Holmes, is a traditional biography of one of the most important public figures in the United States since the Civil War.

Although the author disclaims it, Honorable Justice is a defense of Holmes. Novick writes of some of Holmes’ faults, but too often Holmes’ human imperfections are defended as strengths. It appears that Novick was trying hard to defend Holmes from late twentieth century critiques. This defense of Holmes seems a misguided attempt to re(de)ify Holmes to a group of readers which will likely include a large proportion of skeptical, …


Suicidal Rights, Michael S. Ariens Jan 1988

Suicidal Rights, Michael S. Ariens

Faculty Articles

The legal debate regarding the right to commit suicide requires a critical review of the relationship between the individual and the community in present liberal political thought. Modern liberal political thought postulates that the government or community must be neutral about what is good both for members of the community and the community itself. It also postulates that there exists a sphere of action which affects solely an individual.

The neutrality postulate and the harm of self/harm to others dichotomy are best explicated by John Stuart Mill in his essay On Liberty, in which Mill separates and categorizes the individual …


Federal Economic Regulation Through Wage And Price Control Programs: 1917–1980 A Selected Bibliography, Bernard D. Reams Jr. Jan 1981

Federal Economic Regulation Through Wage And Price Control Programs: 1917–1980 A Selected Bibliography, Bernard D. Reams Jr.

Faculty Articles

A significant portion of the law of the United States is currently embodied in, formed by, or effectuated through the rules, regulations, programs, and policies of governmental agencies. Early legal decisions on economic stability issues were made by administrative bureaus, boards and commissions, and many were rarely reviewed by courts, reported in newspapers or examined by scholars. Most administrators’ decision were made informally, undramatically, in the deep recesses of their bureaus. Many of their records rested unrecognized and poorly indexed in official government documents or in the National Archives.

For researchers attempting to bring together the materials involved in legislating …