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The Promise Of Telehealth For Abortion, Greer Donley, Rachel Rebouché Jan 2023

The Promise Of Telehealth For Abortion, Greer Donley, Rachel Rebouché

Book Chapters

The COVID-19 pandemic catalyzed a transformation of abortion care. For most of the last half century, abortion was provided in clinics outside of the traditional healthcare setting. Though a medication regimen was approved in 2000 that would terminate a pregnancy without a surgical procedure, the Food & Drug Administration required, among other things, that the drug be dispensed in person. This requirement dramatically limited the medication’s promise to revolutionize abortion because it subjected medication abortion to the same physical barriers of procedural care.

Over the course of the COVID-19 pandemic, however, that changed. The pandemic’s early days exposed how the …


Preventing Child Maltreatment Through Medical-Legal Partnership, Debra Chopp Jun 2021

Preventing Child Maltreatment Through Medical-Legal Partnership, Debra Chopp

Book Chapters

There has been significant attention in recent years to health care delivery models that address social determinants of health. One such model is medical-legal partnership (MLP). MLPs join health care providers with lawyers to address health-harming legal needs in the lives of vulnerable patients. Research on MLPs has demonstrated their success in reducing stress and increasing health and well-being in the patients they serve and in their families. This chapter explores the possibility of using MLP as a tool to prevent child maltreatment.


Commentary On Burton V. State, Greer Donley Jan 2021

Commentary On Burton V. State, Greer Donley

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In March of 2009, Samantha Burton went into labor only 25 weeks into her pregnancy. This is a very serious pregnancy complication that not only risks the pregnant woman’s health, but also greatly reduces her potential child’s chance of survival despite the most aggressive care. Ms. Burton’s doctor prescribed, among other things, inpatient bed rest for the duration of her pregnancy, which would have required her to be separated from her two minor children at home. Ms. Burton found that recommendation unacceptable, and as a competent adult, asked to be discharged or to obtain a second opinion from another hospital. …


Executive Power And The Aca, Nicholas Bagley Jan 2020

Executive Power And The Aca, Nicholas Bagley

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As with any law of its complexity and ambition, the Affordable Care Act (ACA) vests in the sitting president broad implementation discretion. The law is not a blank check: in many ways both large and small, the ACA shapes and constrains the exercise of executive power. But Congress has neither the institutional resources nor the attention span to micromanage the rollout of a massive health program. It has no choice but to delegate.

Naturally, both President Obama and President Trump have drawn on their authority to tailor the ACA to their policy preferences. Neither president, however, has been able to …


Biobanks As Innovation Infrastructure For Translational Medicine, W. Nicholson Price Ii Apr 2019

Biobanks As Innovation Infrastructure For Translational Medicine, W. Nicholson Price Ii

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Biobanks represent an opportunity for the use of big data to drive translational medicine. Precision medicine demands data to shape treatments to individual patient characteristics; large datasets can also suggest new uses for old drugs or relationships between previously unlinked conditions. But these tasks can be stymied when data are siloed in different datasets, smaller biobanks, or completely proprietary private resources. This hampers not only analysis of the data themselves, but also efforts to translate data-based insights into actionable recommendations and to transfer the discovered technology into a commercialization pipeline. Cross-project technological innovation, development, and validation are all more difficult …


Health Care Ai: Law, Regulation, And Policy., W. Nicholson Price Ii Jan 2019

Health Care Ai: Law, Regulation, And Policy., W. Nicholson Price Ii

Book Chapters

As discussed in previous chapters, artificial intelligence (AI) has the potential to be involved in almost all aspects of the health care industry. The legal landscape for health care AI is complex; AI systems with different intended uses, audiences, and use environments face different requirements at state, federal, and international levels. A full accounting of these legal requirements, or of the policy questions involved, is far beyond the scope of this chapter. Additionally, the legal and regulatory framework for AI in health care continues to evolve, given the nascent stage of the industry.

In this chapter, we offer an overview …


Medical Malpractice And Black-Box Medicine, W. Nicholson Price Ii Jan 2018

Medical Malpractice And Black-Box Medicine, W. Nicholson Price Ii

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The explosive proliferation of health data has combined with the rapid development of machine-learning algorithms to enable a new form of medicine: “black-box medicine.” In this phenomenon, algorithms troll through tremendous databases of health data to find patterns that can be used to guide care, whether by predicting unknown patient risks, selecting the right drug, suggesting a new use of an old drug, or triaging patients to preserve health resources. These decisions differ from previous data-based decisions because black-box medicine is, by its nature, opaque; that is, the bases for black-box decisions are unknown and unknowable.

Black-box medicine raises a …


Prisoners With Disabilities, Margo Schlanger Nov 2017

Prisoners With Disabilities, Margo Schlanger

Book Chapters

A majority of American prisoners have at least one disability. So how jails and prisons deal with those prisoners’ needs is central to institutional safety and humaneness, and to reentry success or failure. In this chapter, I explain what current law requires of prison and jail officials, focusing on statutory and constitutional law mandating non-discrimination, accommodation, integration, and treatment. Jails and prisons have been very slow to learn the most general lesson of these strictures, which is that officials must individualize their assessment of and response to prisoners with disabilities. In addition, I look past current law to additional policies …


Public Policy And The Legislative Process, Sheila A. Leander, David F. Walz Jan 2017

Public Policy And The Legislative Process, Sheila A. Leander, David F. Walz

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No abstract provided.


Federalism By Waiver After The Health Care Case, Samuel Bagenstos Jan 2013

Federalism By Waiver After The Health Care Case, Samuel Bagenstos

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The Supreme Court's Spending Clause holding in National Federation of Independent Businesses v. Sebelius (NFIB) is likely to be consequential for many reasons. It will have a direct effect on the implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), which relied on the expansion of Medicaid-now made voluntary by the Court-to obtain health care coverage for more than fifteen million previously uninsured people. At this writing, it remains unclear how many states will participate in the expansion. The Congressional Budget Office recently estimated that, as a result of the Court's decision, three million fewer people will obtain new Medicaid coverage under …


Dismembering Families, Anthony C. Infanti Jan 2011

Dismembering Families, Anthony C. Infanti

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In this paper, I explore how the deduction for extraordinary medical expenses, codified in I.R.C. section 213, furthers domination in American society. On its face, section 213 probably does not seem a likely candidate for being tagged as furthering domination. After all, this provision aims to alleviate extraordinary financial burdens on taxpayers who already suffer from significant medical problems -- and who, by definition, lack the help of insurance to relieve those burdens. But, as laudable as this goal might be, careful attention to the text and context of section 213 reveals that it does not apply to all taxpayers …


Can There Be A Progressive Bioethics?, Richard O. Lempert Jan 2010

Can There Be A Progressive Bioethics?, Richard O. Lempert

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Progressive bioethics-the words are not an oxymoron. Far from it; they are more redundant than oppositional. Yet they leave me almost as uneasy, as if they were contradictory. My unease exists because bioethics should be neither progressive nor regressive, neither right wing nor left wing, neither liberal nor conservative. It should be just good, sound ethics applied to the often difficult moral problems posed by present-day medicine and the genomic revolution.

I do not mean to suggest by this that all bioethicists need agree. Respectable ethicists using established modes of ethical analysis have long disagreed on and argued for different …


Patents On Dna Sequences: Molecules And Information, Rebecca S. Eisenberg Jan 2002

Patents On Dna Sequences: Molecules And Information, Rebecca S. Eisenberg

Book Chapters

As public and private sector initiatives raced to complete the sequence of the human genome, patent issues played a prominent role in speculations about the significance of this achievement. How much of the genome would be subject to the control of patent holders, and what would this mean for future research and the development of products for the improvement of human health in a patent system developed to establish rights in mechanical inventions of an earlier era up to the task of resolving competing claim, to the genome on behalf or the many sequential innovators who elucidate its sequence and …


Concluding Thoughts: Bioethics In The Language Of The Law, Carl E. Schneider Jan 2000

Concluding Thoughts: Bioethics In The Language Of The Law, Carl E. Schneider

Book Chapters

What happens when the language of the law becomes a vulgar tongue? What happens, more particularly, when parties to bioethical disputes are obliged to borrow in their daily controversies, the ideas, and even the language, peculiar to judicial proceedings? How suited are the habits and tastes and thus the language of the judicial magistrate to the political, and more particularly, the bioethical, questions of our time? We must ask these questions because, as the incomparable Tocqueville foresaw, it has become American practice to resolve political—and moral—questions into judicial questions. We now reverently refer to the Supreme Court as the great …


Information, Decisions, And The Limits Of Informed Consent, Carl E. Scheider, Michael H. Farrell Jan 2000

Information, Decisions, And The Limits Of Informed Consent, Carl E. Scheider, Michael H. Farrell

Book Chapters

For many years, the heart's wish of bioethics has been to confide medical decisions to patients and not to doctors. The favoured key to doing so has been the doctrine of informed consent. The theory of and hopes for that doctrine are well captured in the influential case of Caterbury v. Spence: '[t]rue consent to what happens to one's self is the informed exercise of a choice, and that entails an opportunity to evaluate knoledgeably the options available and the risks attendant upon each'.


Making Biomedical Policy Through Constitutional Adjudication:The Example Of Physician-Assisted Suicide, Carl E. Scheider Jan 2000

Making Biomedical Policy Through Constitutional Adjudication:The Example Of Physician-Assisted Suicide, Carl E. Scheider

Book Chapters

Throughout most of American history no one would have supposed biomedical policy could or should be made through constitutional adjudication. No one would have thought that the Constitution spoke to biomedical issues, that those issues were questions of federal policy, or that judges were competent to handle them. Today, however, the resurgence of substantive due process has swollen the scope of the Fourteenth Amendment, the distinction between federal and state spheres is tattered, and few statutes escape judicial vetting. Furthermore, Abraham Lincoln's wish that the Constitution should "become the political religion of the nation" has been granted. "We now reverently …


The Road To Glucksberg, Carl E. Scheider Jan 2000

The Road To Glucksberg, Carl E. Scheider

Book Chapters

No abstract provided.


Rights Discourse And Neonatal Euthanasia, Carl Schneider Jan 1999

Rights Discourse And Neonatal Euthanasia, Carl Schneider

Book Chapters

At the heart of our difficulty in approaching neonatal euthanasia lie the intractable questions it raises: What is human life? When is death preferable to life? What do parents owe their children? What does society owe the suffering? Those moral questions could hardly be more perplexing, yet they are further complicated when they must be resolved not informally and case by case, but through generally applicable social rules. This is so for numerous reasons. For instance, the wide range of deeply held opinions about neonatal euthanasia makes rules hard to formulate, and the wide range of factual situations in which …


Patent Rights In The Human Genome Project, Rebecca S. Eisenberg Jan 1992

Patent Rights In The Human Genome Project, Rebecca S. Eisenberg

Book Chapters

The various research efforts that comprise the Human Genome Project will inevitably both draw on and yield a multitude of patentable inventions. The broad subject matter of the patent laws potentially reaches every phase of the Genome Project, from the discovery of new research technologies, such as techniques and equipment for DNA sequencing, through the ultimate development of new products, such as screening tests for genetically transmitted diseases. Even bits and pieces of the human genome itself may be, and sometimes have been, patented.' Nor does the fact that the public is paying for the Genome Project through federal funding …


Final Frontier: Life, Death And Law, Yale Kamisar Jan 1991

Final Frontier: Life, Death And Law, Yale Kamisar

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[T]o call Nancy Cruzan's case a matter of the right to die seems strained, if not contrived. The situation is a tragic one. Cruzan has been in a persistent vegetative state since 1983, when, at the age of 25, she was in a severe car accident. Although she is able to breathe on her own, she receives all her nutrition and fluids through a feeding tube inserted into her stomach. When her parents sought to halt this life support, they were rebuffed, first by officials of the Missouri state hospital where Cruzan is a patient and ultimately by the Missouri …


A Response To "Two Puzzles", Carl E. Schneider Jan 1988

A Response To "Two Puzzles", Carl E. Schneider

Book Chapters

In his stimulating paper, Professor Mnookin suggests that the legal issue of neonatal euthanasia may be seen in terms of two puzzles: First, what accounts for the ''striking dichotomy between the law on the books, which apparently outlaws such conduct, and the law in action, which apparently permits it"? Second, why has "the treatment of severely handicapped newborns . . . evoked such a violent storm in the last few years"? Professor Mnookin resolves the first puzzle by suggesting that the ''dichotomy between the law on the books and the law in action may serve as a pragmatic, although not …


Rewriting Roe V. Wade, Donald H. Regan Jan 1980

Rewriting Roe V. Wade, Donald H. Regan

Book Chapters

Roe v. Wade is one of the most controversial cases the Supreme Court has decided. The result in the case — the establishment of a constitutional right to abortion — was controversial enough. Beyond that, even people who approve of the result have been dissatisfied with the Court's opinion. Others before me have attempted to explain how a better opinion could have been written. It seems to me, however, that the most promising argument in support of the result of Roe has not yet been made. This essay contains my suggestions for ""rewriting" Roe v. Wade.


The Principle Of The Least Restrictive Alternative For Mentally-Retarded Persons: The Constitutional Issues, David L. Chambers Jan 1976

The Principle Of The Least Restrictive Alternative For Mentally-Retarded Persons: The Constitutional Issues, David L. Chambers

Book Chapters

Mentally retarded people are people. When strong reasons exist to treat them differently from other people, they should be provided the necessary services, restraint, or protection through means that intrude as little as possible on their freedom to live the life that others are permitted to live. "Normalization" is the term professionals use to define the goal and the process of helping mentally retarded citizens lead a "normal" life. The attainment of this goal involves undoing the multitude of formal constrictions governments have typically placed on the retarded citizen's freedom: his place of residence, his schooling, his control over his …


Euthanasia Legislation: Some Non-Religious Objections, Yale Kamisar Jan 1969

Euthanasia Legislation: Some Non-Religious Objections, Yale Kamisar

Book Chapters

A book by Glanville Williams, The Sanctity of Life and the Criminal Law,1 once again brought to the fore the controversial topic of euthanasia, more popularly known as 'mercy-killing'. In keep_ ing with the trend of the e.uthanasia movement over the past generation, Williams concentrates his efforts for reform on the voluntary type of euthanasia, for example the cancer victim begging for death, as opposed to the involuntary variety -- that is, the case of the congenital idiot, the permanently insane, or the senile

When a legal scholar of Williams's stature joins the ranks of such formidable law thinkers as …