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Articles 1 - 26 of 26

Full-Text Articles in Law

Getting Real About Procedure: Changing How We Think, Write And Teach About American Civil Procedure, Suzette M. Malveaux Jan 2021

Getting Real About Procedure: Changing How We Think, Write And Teach About American Civil Procedure, Suzette M. Malveaux

Articles

No abstract provided.


Response, Making Litigating Citizenship More Fair, Ming H. Chen Jan 2020

Response, Making Litigating Citizenship More Fair, Ming H. Chen

Articles

No abstract provided.


Reproductive Health Care Exceptionalism And The Pandemic, Helen Norton Jan 2020

Reproductive Health Care Exceptionalism And The Pandemic, Helen Norton

Articles

No abstract provided.


The Gdpr’S Version Of Algorithmic Accountability, Margot Kaminski Jan 2018

The Gdpr’S Version Of Algorithmic Accountability, Margot Kaminski

Articles

No abstract provided.


Agency Innovation In Vermont Yankee's White Space, Emily S. Bremer, Sharon B. Jacobs Jan 2017

Agency Innovation In Vermont Yankee's White Space, Emily S. Bremer, Sharon B. Jacobs

Articles

The literature on “agency discretion” has, with a few notable exceptions, largely focused on substantive policy discretion, not procedural discretion. In this essay, we seek to refocus debate on the latter, which we argue is no less worthy of attention. We do so by defining the parameters of what we call Vermont Yankee’s “white space” — the scope of agency discretion to experiment with procedures within the boundaries established by law (and thus beyond the reach of the courts). Our goal is to begin a conversation about the dimensions of this procedural negative space, in which agencies are free to ...


Government Speech And The War On Terror, Helen Norton Jan 2017

Government Speech And The War On Terror, Helen Norton

Articles

The government is unique among speakers because of its coercive power, its substantial resources, its privileged access to national security and intelligence information, and its wide variety of expressive roles as commander-in-chief, policymaker, educator, employer, property owner, and more. Precisely because of this power, variety, and ubiquity, the government's speech can both provide great value and inflict great harm to the public. In wartime, more specifically, the government can affirmatively choose to use its voice to inform, inspire, heal, and unite -- or instead to deceive, divide, bully, and silence.

In this essay, I examine the U.S. government's ...


Revoking Rights, Craig J. Konnoth Jan 2015

Revoking Rights, Craig J. Konnoth

Articles

In important areas of law, such as the vested rights doctrine, and in several important cases--including those involving the continued validity of same-sex marriages and the Affordable Care Act--courts have scrutinized the revocation of rights once granted more closely than the failure to provide the rights in the first place. This project claims that in so doing, courts seek to preserve important constitutional interests. On the one hand, based on our understanding of rights possession, rights revocation implicates autonomy interests of the rights holder to a greater degree than a failure to afford rights at the outset. On the other ...


Outing Privacy, Scott Skinner-Thompson Jan 2015

Outing Privacy, Scott Skinner-Thompson

Articles

The government regularly outs information concerning people's sexuality, gender identity, and HIV status. Notwithstanding the implications of such outings, the Supreme Court has yet to resolve whether the Constitution contains a right to informational privacy - a right to limit the government's ability to collect and disseminate personal information.

This Article probes informational privacy theory and jurisprudence to better understand the judiciary's reluctance to fully embrace a constitutional right to informational privacy. The Article argues that while existing scholarly theories of informational privacy encourage us to broadly imagine the right and its possibilities, often focusing on informational privacy ...


The Government's Lies And The Constitution, Helen Norton Jan 2015

The Government's Lies And The Constitution, Helen Norton

Articles

Governments lie. They do so for many different reasons to a wide range of audiences on a variety of topics. Although courts and commentators have extensively explored whether and when the First Amendment permits the government to regulate lies told by private speakers, relatively little attention has yet been paid to the constitutional implications of the government's intentional falsehoods. This Article helps fill that gap by exploring when, if ever, the Constitution prohibits our government from lying to us.

The government’s lies can be devastating. This is the case, for example, of its lies told to resist legal ...


Revisiting The Mansions And Gatehouses Of Criminal Procedure: Reflections On Yale Kamisar's Famous Essay, William T. Pizzi Jan 2015

Revisiting The Mansions And Gatehouses Of Criminal Procedure: Reflections On Yale Kamisar's Famous Essay, William T. Pizzi

Articles

In 1965, Yale Kamisar published a now-famous essay entitled, Equal Justice in the Gatehouses and Mansions of American Criminal Procedure: From Powell to Gideon, from Escobedo to... to make his case that the Court needed to take action to protect citizens in interrogation rooms, Kamisar used the powerful metaphors of the gatehouse and the mansion to contrast the treatment received in interrogation rooms in the back of police stations with the way defendants were treated when they arrived at courthouses where the power of the state was restricted and they had strong constitutional protections.

On its 50th anniversary since publication ...


Body And Soul: Equality, Pregnancy, And The Unitary Right To Abortion, Jennifer S. Hendricks Jan 2010

Body And Soul: Equality, Pregnancy, And The Unitary Right To Abortion, Jennifer S. Hendricks

Articles

This Article explores equality-based arguments for abortion rights, revealing both their necessity and their pitfalls. It first uses the narrowness of the "health exception" to abortion regulations to demonstrate why equality arguments are needed--namely because our legal tradition's conception of liberty is based on male experience, no theory of basic human rights grounded in women's reproductive experiences has developed. Next, however, the Article shows that equality arguments, although necessary, can undermine women's reproductive freedom by requiring that pregnancy and abortion be analogized to male experiences. As a result, equality arguments focus on either the bodily or the ...


The Accounting: Habeas Corpus And Enemy Combatants, Emily Calhoun Jan 2008

The Accounting: Habeas Corpus And Enemy Combatants, Emily Calhoun

Articles

The judiciary should impose a heavy burden of justification on the executive when a habeas petitioner challenges the accuracy of facts on which an enemy combatant designation rests. A heavy burden of justification will ensure that the essential institutional purposes of the writ--and legitimate, separated-powers government--are preserved, even during times of national exigency. The institutional purposes of the writ argue for robust judicial review rather than deference to the executive. Moreover, the procedural flexibility traditionally associated with the writ gives the judiciary the tools to ensure that a heavy burden of justification can be imposed.


Today's Indian Wars: Between Cyberspace And The United Nations, S. James Anaya Jan 2006

Today's Indian Wars: Between Cyberspace And The United Nations, S. James Anaya

Articles

No abstract provided.


Restructuring The Debate Over Fetal Homicide Laws, Carolyn B. Ramsey Jan 2006

Restructuring The Debate Over Fetal Homicide Laws, Carolyn B. Ramsey

Articles

The worst problems with the fetal homicide laws that have proliferated around the nation are quite different than the existing scholarship suggests. Critics often argue that the statutes, which criminalize the killing of a fetus by a third party other than an abortion provider, undermine a woman's right to terminate her pregnancy. This concern is overstated. Although supported by anti-abortionists, many of the fetal homicide laws embody the perspective of the so-called "abortion grays," who eschew the absolutism of the doctrinaire pro-choice and anti-abortion camps. This Article explores how a contextual view of life-taking allows us to reconcile legal ...


Taking Miranda's Pulse, William T. Pizzi, Morris B. Hoffman Jan 2005

Taking Miranda's Pulse, William T. Pizzi, Morris B. Hoffman

Articles

No abstract provided.


California's Sexually Violent Predator Act: The Role Of Psychiatrists, Courts, And Medical Determinations In Confining Sex Offenders, Carolyn B. Ramsey Jan 1999

California's Sexually Violent Predator Act: The Role Of Psychiatrists, Courts, And Medical Determinations In Confining Sex Offenders, Carolyn B. Ramsey

Articles

No abstract provided.


Avoiding Error In Closing Argument, H. Patrick Furman Jan 1995

Avoiding Error In Closing Argument, H. Patrick Furman

Articles

No abstract provided.


Public Programs, Private Deciders: The Constitutionality Of Arbitration In Federal Programs, Harold H. Bruff Jan 1989

Public Programs, Private Deciders: The Constitutionality Of Arbitration In Federal Programs, Harold H. Bruff

Articles

No abstract provided.


Do Government Rights Prevail, Or Are Shoshone Indians Trespassers In Their Own Country?, Richard B. Collins Jan 1984

Do Government Rights Prevail, Or Are Shoshone Indians Trespassers In Their Own Country?, Richard B. Collins

Articles

No abstract provided.


A Comment On The Burger Court And "Judicial Activism", Robert F. Nagel Jan 1981

A Comment On The Burger Court And "Judicial Activism", Robert F. Nagel

Articles

No abstract provided.


Competency To Stand Trial In Federal Courts: Conceptual And Constitutional Problems, William T. Pizzi Jan 1977

Competency To Stand Trial In Federal Courts: Conceptual And Constitutional Problems, William T. Pizzi

Articles

No abstract provided.


Congressional Control Of Administrative Regulation: A Study Of Legislative Vetoes, Harold H. Bruff, Ernest Gellhorn Jan 1977

Congressional Control Of Administrative Regulation: A Study Of Legislative Vetoes, Harold H. Bruff, Ernest Gellhorn

Articles

Several administrative programs contain provisions allowing Congress to veto agency rules, and there is now a bill before Congress to extend this veto power to all agency rulemaking. In this Article, Professor Bruff and Dean Gellhorn analyze the histories of five federal programs subject to the legislative veto to determine the effect of the veto on the rulemaking process and on the relationships between the branches of government. Extrapolating from this practical experience, they suggest that a general legislative veto is unlikely to increase the overall efficiency of the administrative process, may impede the achievement of reasoned decisionmaking based on ...


Judicial Review In Local Government Law: A Reappraisal, Harold H. Bruff Jan 1976

Judicial Review In Local Government Law: A Reappraisal, Harold H. Bruff

Articles

No abstract provided.


The North Slope Borough, Oil, And The Future Of Local Government In Alaska, David H. Getches Jan 1973

The North Slope Borough, Oil, And The Future Of Local Government In Alaska, David H. Getches

Articles

No abstract provided.


Unconstitutional Conditions Upon Public Employment: New Departures In The Protection Of First Amendment Rights, Harold H. Bruff Jan 1969

Unconstitutional Conditions Upon Public Employment: New Departures In The Protection Of First Amendment Rights, Harold H. Bruff

Articles

No abstract provided.


Comment, The Ex-Convict's Right To Vote, David H. Getches Jan 1967

Comment, The Ex-Convict's Right To Vote, David H. Getches

Articles

No abstract provided.