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Articles

Entertainment, Arts, and Sports Law

2010

University of Washington School of Law

Articles 1 - 2 of 2

Full-Text Articles in Law

Baseball's Moral Hazard: Law, Economics, And The Designated Hitter Rule, Dustin E. Buehler, Steve P. Calandrillo Jan 2010

Baseball's Moral Hazard: Law, Economics, And The Designated Hitter Rule, Dustin E. Buehler, Steve P. Calandrillo

Articles

No subject prompts greater disagreement among baseball fans than the designated hitter rule, which allows teams to designate a player to hit for the pitcher. The rule increases the number of hit batsmen, and some have suggested this effect is a result of "moral hazard," which recognizes that persons insured against risk are more likely to engage in dangerous behavior. Because American League pitchers do not bat, they allegedly are not deterred by the full cost of making risky, inside pitches—namely, retribution during their next at bat.

Using a law-and-economics approach, this Article concludes that the designated hitter rule creates …


Embedded Advertising And The Venture Consumer, Zahr Said Jan 2010

Embedded Advertising And The Venture Consumer, Zahr Said

Articles

Embedded advertising—marketing that promotes brands from within entertainment content—is a thriving, rapidly changing practice. Analysts estimate that embedded advertising expenditures will exceed $10 billion in 2010. The market continues to grow even as traditional advertising revenues contract. The relatively few legal scholars who have studied embedded advertising believe that it is under-regulated. Ineffective regulation, they claim, is deeply troubling because corporations may, with legal impunity, deceptively pitch products to trusting viewers. Critics charge that embedded advertising creates "hyper-commercialism," distorts consumers' tastes, taints the artistic process, and erodes faith in public discourse.

This Article argues that the critics are wrong. Sponsorship …