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Full-Text Articles in Law

Conclusion: Trigger Crimes & Social Progress, Paul H. Robinson, Sarah M. Robinson Aug 2017

Conclusion: Trigger Crimes & Social Progress, Paul H. Robinson, Sarah M. Robinson

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Can a crime make our world better? Crimes are the worst of humanity’s wrongs but, oddly, they sometimes do more than anything else to improve our lives. It is often the outrageousness itself that does the work. Ordinary crimes are accepted as the background noise of everyday existence but some crimes make people stop and take notice – because they are so outrageous or so heart-wrenching.

This brief essay explores the dynamic of tragedy, outrage, and reform, illustrating how certain kinds of crimes can trigger real social progress. Several dozen such “trigger crimes” are identified but four in particular are …


The Obese And The Elite: Using Law To Reclaim School Sports, Dionne L. Koller Apr 2015

The Obese And The Elite: Using Law To Reclaim School Sports, Dionne L. Koller

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Sports in schools are a uniquely American phenomenon. Athletic programs flourish in high schools, colleges, and universities with traditionally very little interference by legislatures or courts. The most notable, if not limited, exception to this deference is Title IX of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (Title IX), which prohibits educational institutions receiving federal financial assistance from discriminating on the basis of gender. As applied to athletic programs, Title IX is often cited as a public policy success. The law has led to the creation of meaningful sports participation opportunities for women and girls and shaped new norms for sports …


Maryland's Family Divisions: Sensible Justice For Families And Children, Barbara A. Babb Jan 2013

Maryland's Family Divisions: Sensible Justice For Families And Children, Barbara A. Babb

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In January 1998, the judges of the Court of Appeals of Maryland signed Rule 16-204 and formally launched the process of family justice system reform in Maryland. During the ensuing fifteen years, Maryland became a national model in this area. These changes and improvements occurred largely because of the inspirational leadership of Chief Judge Robert M. Bell, a man owed a debt of gratitude by everyone involved in family law proceedings, including families, children, attorneys, judges, court personnel, and services providers, among others.

This Tribute honors Chief Judge Bell by contextualizing the enormity of the process and outcomes resulting from …


Nation-Building In The Penumbra: Notes From A Liminal State, Monica E. Eppinger Jan 2009

Nation-Building In The Penumbra: Notes From A Liminal State, Monica E. Eppinger

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The emergence of post-Socialist legal orders is reshaping some of the familiar terrain of comparative legal studies. This Article, invited as part of an effort to think about the topic of "What the Rest think of the West," reconsiders the vast legal re-codification projects that stand at the center of "nation-building" projects in formerly Socialist states. Such projects, and the rupture from which they emerge, challenge essentialist or static notions of identity and assumptions of where the West is or where the Rest begin. Anthropological concepts of "liminality" and "deixis" assist in understanding Ukrainian legal experts' thinking on legal reforms …


Lawyering For Social Change: The Power Of The Narrative In Domestic Violence Law Reform, Jane C. Murphy Jan 1993

Lawyering For Social Change: The Power Of The Narrative In Domestic Violence Law Reform, Jane C. Murphy

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The role of the narrative or story in legal discourse has been explored and developed in legal scholarship over the last several years. The goals of the various calls for more storytelling in the legal context vary. They generally relate, however, to a desire to move away from exclusive reliance on abstract legal argumentation to persuade. The goals of ‘storytellers‘ are also linked to furthering an understanding of the dynamics of oppression based on race or gender, or both.

The judicial and legislative processes have always included a narrative component. Clinical legal scholarship has also explored the critical role of …