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Articles 1 - 23 of 23

Full-Text Articles in Law

Lemonade: A Racial Justice Reframing Of The Roberts Court’S Criminal Jurisprudence, Daniel S. Harawa Jan 2022

Lemonade: A Racial Justice Reframing Of The Roberts Court’S Criminal Jurisprudence, Daniel S. Harawa

Scholarship@WashULaw

The saying goes, when life gives you lemons, make lemonade. When it comes to the Supreme Court’s criminal jurisprudence and its relationship to racial (in)equity, progressive scholars often focus on the tartness of the lemons. In particular, they have studied how the Court often ignores race in its criminal decisions, a move that in turn reifies a racially subordinating criminalization system.

However, the Court has recently issued a series of decisions addressing racism in the criminal legal system: Buck v. Davis, Peña-Rodriguez v. Colorado, Timbs v. Indiana, Flowers v. Mississippi, and
Ramos v. Louisiana. On their face, the cases teach …


The Changing Landscape For Billboard Regulation, Daniel R. Mandelker Jan 2022

The Changing Landscape For Billboard Regulation, Daniel R. Mandelker

Scholarship@WashULaw

Expectation turns to the Supreme Court as it once more takes up a free speech dispute about billboard regulation. On June 28, 2021, the Court granted the City of Austin’s Petition for Writ of Certiorari in Reagan National Advertising of Austin, Inc. v. City of Austin, 972 F.3d 696 (5th Cir. 2020), in which the Fifth Circuit struck down the city’s ban on digitizing off-premises signs. Billboards have a long history of legal contention, and billboard intolerance is historic. Billboards have their place, but they can overpower the aesthetic environment and threaten traffic safety. Before they were regulated at the …


A Theory Of Claim Resolution, Scott Baker, Lewis A. Kornhauser Jan 2022

A Theory Of Claim Resolution, Scott Baker, Lewis A. Kornhauser

Scholarship@WashULaw

We study claim resolution. A claim consists of a global fact and a local fact. The global fact is observed by the principal and the agent. The local fact is observed by the agent alone. The agent resolves the claim; the principal decides whether the agent is more likely wrong or right. The principal and agent can disagree about the weight to accord each fact or the overall evidence threshold. The agent cares whether the principal follows or ignores her advice. We characterize how the equilibrium varies with the nature of disagreement. Despite lacking commitment power, we nd that the …


Comments On Proposed Rules For Special Purpose Acquisition Companies, Shell Companies, And Projections, Andrew F. Tuch Jan 2022

Comments On Proposed Rules For Special Purpose Acquisition Companies, Shell Companies, And Projections, Andrew F. Tuch

Scholarship@WashULaw

In March 2022, the Securities and Exchange Commission released proposed rules for special purpose acquisition companies (SPACs), shell companies, and projections. In this comment letter, filed with the SEC, I provide a critical assessment of this proposal.

The SEC proposed far-reaching changes intended to enhance investor protections and align disclosure and liability rules in de-SPACs more closely with those in traditional IPOs. An under-appreciated feature of the proposed reforms is that they would subject de-SPACs to provisions closely modeled on Rule 13e-3 of the Exchange Act, which applies to going-private transactions, including management buyouts. Intended to tackle potential conflicts of …


The Challenges Of Applying Computational Legal Analysis To Mhealth Security And Privacy Regulations, Brian Tung Aug 2021

The Challenges Of Applying Computational Legal Analysis To Mhealth Security And Privacy Regulations, Brian Tung

McKelvey School of Engineering Theses & Dissertations

As our world has grown in complexity, so have our laws. By one measure, the United States Code has grown over 30x as long since 1935, and the 186,000-page Code of Federal Regulations has grown almost 10x in length since 1938. Our growing legal system is too complicated; it’s impossible for people to know all the laws that apply to them. However, people are still subject to the law, even if they are unfamiliar with it. Therein lies the need for computational legal analysis. Tools of computation (e.g., data visualization, algorithms, and artificial intelligence) have the potential to transform civic …


The Apa And The Assault On Deference, Ronald Levin Jan 2021

The Apa And The Assault On Deference, Ronald Levin

Scholarship@WashULaw

Recently, in Kisor v. Wilkie, a concurring opinion by Justice Gorsuch argued at length that § 706 of the Administrative Procedure Act prohibits judicial deference to administrative interpretations of law. That section states that “the reviewing court shall decide all relevant questions of law.” This issue remained unresolved in Kisor, but the Supreme Court may well return to it soon as a potential argument against the validity of Chevron deference. Although a substantial academic literature has supported Gorsuch’s position on the APA question, this article disagrees with it. It argues that the text of § 706, surrounding statutory provisions, the …


How Do Environmental Changes And Shared Cultural Experiences Impact The Health Of Indigenous Peoples In South Louisiana?, Shanondora M. Billiot May 2017

How Do Environmental Changes And Shared Cultural Experiences Impact The Health Of Indigenous Peoples In South Louisiana?, Shanondora M. Billiot

Arts & Sciences Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Global environmental change is an ongoing and complex social problem that will continue to permeate all spheres of life on earth (Moran, 2010). Not all communities experience social and economic consequences of environmental change at the same level (Adger, 2006a; Cutter, Boruff, & Shirley, 2003; Gillespie, 2010; Nicholls et al., 2007; Vogel, Moser, Kasperson, & Dabelko, 2007). The variability of vulnerability, or potential for exposure or harm, stems from proximity to fragile ecosystems as well as social and economic differences across communities (Boruff, Emrich, & Cutter, 2005). Additionally, environmental changes are projected to have adverse impacts on marginalized populations through …


America's Dangerous Political Polarization And Moderate Stigma, Dan Sicorsky May 2016

America's Dangerous Political Polarization And Moderate Stigma, Dan Sicorsky

Washington University Undergraduate Law Review

This paper addresses the underlying causes of polarization and moderate stigma, and proposes methods for increasing the number of nonpartisan politicians. A reemergence of moderate, non-binary voices in representative bodies can remedy Washington's historic unproductiveness and voting center's shameful desertedness. If we do not alter the ways we think, act, and vote, the two aisles will keep bloodily drifting apart, voting will end up an antiquated tradition, and Washington will cement its image as the battleground of unproductiveness.


Introduction To The Washington University Undergraduate Law Review, C.J. Harrington May 2016

Introduction To The Washington University Undergraduate Law Review, C.J. Harrington

Washington University Undergraduate Law Review

No abstract provided.


Race And The Jury: How The Law Is Keeping Minorities Off The Jury, Stephanie Adamakos May 2016

Race And The Jury: How The Law Is Keeping Minorities Off The Jury, Stephanie Adamakos

Washington University Undergraduate Law Review

The modern jury focuses on three main ideas: impartiality, as laid out in the Sixth Amendment, jury of one’s peers, stemming from the Magna Carta, and a jury that represents a fair cross-section of the community. The cross-section idea has been developed by case law, but originates from the Sixth Amendment, under the belief that jury selection that does not systematically discriminate against members of the community and has a jury pool represents a cross-section of the community is likely to be impartial. Jurors are likely to draw upon their own experiences when deliberating, so having a variety of experiences …


Globalization And Gender: Inequality Transformed In Spain, Destiny Levere May 2016

Globalization And Gender: Inequality Transformed In Spain, Destiny Levere

Washington University Undergraduate Law Review

This article examines the extent to which the boom of globalization led to the transformation of gender inequality in Spain, based on three schools of thought: one, that globalization has transformed gender inequality in Spain for the better by creating equal opportunities, two, that globalization has caused a more stark contrast and practice of gender inequality in Spain, and three, that globalization has made no difference in Spain’s fight with gender inequality. In order to portray the three schools of thought, a comparison will be drawn between what gender roles and opportunities were given to men and women in Spain …


Domination Or Kinship? Interpreting Feminist Concerns About Islamic Marriage Law, Rachel Sumption May 2016

Domination Or Kinship? Interpreting Feminist Concerns About Islamic Marriage Law, Rachel Sumption

Washington University Undergraduate Law Review

No abstract provided.


Examining Universal Jurisdiction, Sondra Anton May 2016

Examining Universal Jurisdiction, Sondra Anton

Washington University Undergraduate Law Review

This article considers the heightened debate over the role of universal jurisdiction within international law, and concludes it should not be judged based on the appropriateness or foundation set by remote precedents. Given the clear disregard for physical integrity rights repeatedly demonstrated by even the most “democratic” of modern governments, it is more pressing than ever to develop universal jurisdiction and ensure the norm’s institutionalization in practice.


A Tricky Negotiation: Free Speech Versus Insensitivity, Melvin Dilanchian May 2016

A Tricky Negotiation: Free Speech Versus Insensitivity, Melvin Dilanchian

Washington University Undergraduate Law Review

The central question presented in this paper is whether specialty license plates constitute government speech, and are thus subject to disapproval by the Board of the Texas Department of Motor Vehicles. The core concerns reviewed in this research, largely focus on defining whose speech specialty license plates are. The purpose is to investigate and analyze the precedent established as a result of a recent case, Walker v. Texas Division, Sons of Confederate Veterans. The paper thoroughly reviews the arguments made in the majority opinion, as well as those of the dissenting opinion, with an interdisciplinary approach. The argument presented …


A Borrowed Language, Yvonne Osei Apr 2016

A Borrowed Language, Yvonne Osei

Graduate School of Art Theses

Art has the potency of mediation: bridging human differences, questioning voids in historical trajectories, negotiating spaces of relevance, and most importantly, being signifiers that embody the absent. I speak in a borrowed language, a multilingual visual tongue, inspired by a culmination of Western and African Art modes of practices to create charged platforms for multicultural communication.

My art presents visual portals that allow for intercultural and interracial mingling as issues of colorism, present-day colonialism, gender inequality and the politics of dress are foregrounded for collective deliberation. The essence of the work is often activated and brought to its full potential …


Procedural Justice And Policing: Four New Directions, Rebecca Hollander-Blumoff Jan 2016

Procedural Justice And Policing: Four New Directions, Rebecca Hollander-Blumoff

Washington University Journal of Law & Policy

This Article, by Professor Rebecca Hollander-Blumoff from Washington University School of Law in St. Louis, analyzes the concept of procedural justice within the frame of contemporary policing. Using the shooting of Michael Brown as a catalyst, Hollander-Blumoff advocates for four potential areas of future development in procedural justice: (1) the interaction between the research on self-control and procedural justice; (2) research on the tools most effective in creating positive perceptions of fairness by police; (3) the implications of treating procedural justice not as a dynamic interchange; and (4) the role of reactive devaluation as it might affect reaction to procedural …


Las Madres De Plaza De Mayo, Then And Now: A Comparative Analysis Of Its Fractured Factions And Lasting Sybolism In Buenos Aires, Argentina, Sondra Anton Jan 2015

Las Madres De Plaza De Mayo, Then And Now: A Comparative Analysis Of Its Fractured Factions And Lasting Sybolism In Buenos Aires, Argentina, Sondra Anton

Undergraduate Research Symposium Posters

I conducted research on three different factions of the original Madres de Plaza de Mayo cause in Buenos Aires, Argentina: Asociación Madres de Plaza de Mayo, Madres de Plaza de Mayo Línea Fundadora, and Abuelas de Plaza de Mayo. Through interviews and archival research, I have completed a comparison of the three groups. I have concluded that although their original cause of demanding the whereabouts of their disappeared children united them, they are now deeply fragmented among one another due to their differing opinions of how to achieve justice in post-Dirty War Argentina. Furthermore, it is interesting to note the …


Optimal Patent Jurisprudence, Scott Baker, Claudio Mezzetti Jan 2009

Optimal Patent Jurisprudence, Scott Baker, Claudio Mezzetti

Scholarship@WashULaw

We model judicial learning about optimal patent policy. The court is infinitely lived; the plaintiff and defendant are short lived. Litigated cases provide the court with information about the optimal rule. Different cases provide different sorts of information. Opinions influence the stream of future cases likely to be litigated and, as a result, change the flow of information to the court. In structuring opinions, courts make decisions whether to learn fast or slow. We have three main results. First, patent law will stabilize even if the court places zero value on the "predictability" of legal rules. Second, path dependence of …


Gender Contests, Susan Frelich Appleton Jan 2002

Gender Contests, Susan Frelich Appleton

Scholarship@WashULaw

This contribution for the “Law, Ethics, and Gender in Medicine” column in the Journal of Gender Specific Medicine interrogates the understanding of gender itself, at a time when transgender and intersex issues were just beginning to “come out” in both popular culture and case law. Against this background, the column explores the roles that physicians have played in such gender contests and considers how evolving medical attitudes can help achieve reform.


Fool Us Once Shame On You—Fool Us Twice Shame On Us: What We Can Learn From The Privatizations Of The Internet Backbone Network And The Domain Name System, Jay P. Kesan, Rajiv C. Shah Jan 2001

Fool Us Once Shame On You—Fool Us Twice Shame On Us: What We Can Learn From The Privatizations Of The Internet Backbone Network And The Domain Name System, Jay P. Kesan, Rajiv C. Shah

Washington University Law Review

One goal of this Article is to describe and document the privatization processes for the backbone network and the DNS. We initially assumed the privatization of the Internet consisted of a simple shift from a subsidized network to a competitive market for backbone services. However, we found the privatization process to be quite complex and problematic. Unfortunately, many of these same problems are reoccurring in the current privatization of the DNS. Our study found three categories of problems that occurred during the privatizations of the Internet’s backbone network and the DNS: procedural problems, problems with the management of competition, and …


Lemma Barkeloo And Phoebe Couzins: Among The Nation's First Women Lawyers And Law School Graduates, Karen Tokarz Jan 2001

Lemma Barkeloo And Phoebe Couzins: Among The Nation's First Women Lawyers And Law School Graduates, Karen Tokarz

Washington University Journal of Law & Policy

No abstract provided.


Patent Litigation In Europe—A Glimmer Of Hope? Present Status And Future Perspectives, Joseph Straus Jan 2000

Patent Litigation In Europe—A Glimmer Of Hope? Present Status And Future Perspectives, Joseph Straus

Washington University Journal of Law & Policy

Little imagination is needed to realize the magnitude of the potential for European patents’ validity and infringement litigation in the fifteen Member States of the European Union.


Strategic Disclosure In The Patent System, Douglas Lichtman, Scott Baker, Kate Kraus Jan 2000

Strategic Disclosure In The Patent System, Douglas Lichtman, Scott Baker, Kate Kraus

Scholarship@WashULaw

No abstract provided.