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Full-Text Articles in Law

Pick A Number, Any Number: State Representation In Congress After The 2000 Census, Suzanna Sherry, Paul H. Edelman Jan 2002

Pick A Number, Any Number: State Representation In Congress After The 2000 Census, Suzanna Sherry, Paul H. Edelman

Vanderbilt Law School Faculty Publications

In this essay, Professors Edelman and Sherry explain the mathematics behind the allocation of congressional seats to each state, and survey the different methods of allocation that Congress has used over the years. Using 2000 census figures, they calculate each state's allocation under five different methods, and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of the various methods.


What's Wrong With Baker V. Carr?, Robert Lancaster Oct 1962

What's Wrong With Baker V. Carr?, Robert Lancaster

Vanderbilt Law Review

The decision of the majority of the Supreme Court in Baker v. Carr, the recently decided Tennessee Reapportionment Case, may well turn out to be one of the landmark decisions of American jurisprudence. If by reason of apathetic acquiescence such a judicial intrusion is permitted to go unchallenged and undebated, our federal system of limited and constitutional government may be further weakened. Although the balance of power as between the states and the national government has shifted and this shift has been reflected in and furthered by judicial interpretation of our Constitution, it seems questionable that such a far-reaching and …


Theoretical And Comparative Aspects Of Reapportionment And Redistricting: With Reference To Baker V. Carr, Charles P. Edwards Ph.D. Oct 1962

Theoretical And Comparative Aspects Of Reapportionment And Redistricting: With Reference To Baker V. Carr, Charles P. Edwards Ph.D.

Vanderbilt Law Review

Dr. Edwards in this article applies political theory to evaluate the impact of reapportionment and redistricting on representative government. In so doing he discusses the sources of this political theory and the goals of representative government. He also surveys comparative political practice in Great Britain and the United States. In suggesting various legislative, administrative, and judicial remedies to malapportionment and inequitable districting, Dr. Edwards concludes that the effect of the present litigation resulting from the Baker v. Carr decision will be to arouse public opinion and prompt legislators to meet the accumulated challenges of urbanization as well as other contemporary …