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Full-Text Articles in Law

Policing, Masculinities, And Judicial Acknowledgment, Nicholas J. Prendergast Apr 2022

Policing, Masculinities, And Judicial Acknowledgment, Nicholas J. Prendergast

Vanderbilt Law Review

In the 1980s, the Supreme Court held that courts must consider the “totality of the circumstances” when deciding the reasonableness of a police officer’s conduct in an excessive force suit. To this day, the precise meaning of “reasonableness” remains elusive. For years, courts around the country have struggled to articulate what police conduct should and—equally as saliently— should not be considered during reasonableness determinations. Thus far, the Supreme Court has been unwilling to substantively clarify its reasonableness doctrine. This lack of clarity has led to an untenable patchwork of differing legal frameworks throughout the United States.

This issue exists in …


Putting Cano On Ice – A Path Forward For Border Searches Of Electronic Devices, Davis Price Shugrue Jan 2022

Putting Cano On Ice – A Path Forward For Border Searches Of Electronic Devices, Davis Price Shugrue

Vanderbilt Journal of Entertainment & Technology Law

Across the country, circuit courts disagree over what level of suspicion, if any, is required for border officials to search electronic devices. This leaves law enforcement agencies in the lurch because they must craft nationwide policies that cover jurisdictions with differing rules. The Supreme Court should bring this quandary to an end by holding that no reasonable suspicion or warrant is required for border searches of electronic devices. Many scholars and litigants have called for a reasonable suspicion or warrant requirement in light of Supreme Court decisions like Riley and Carpenter that recognize the privacy concerns raised by searches of …


A World Of Difference? Law Enforcement, Genetic Data, And The Fourth Amendment, Christopher Slobogin, J. W. Hazel Jan 2021

A World Of Difference? Law Enforcement, Genetic Data, And The Fourth Amendment, Christopher Slobogin, J. W. Hazel

Vanderbilt Law School Faculty Publications

Law enforcement agencies are increasingly turning to genetic databases as a way of solving crime, either through requesting the DNA profile of an identified suspect from a database or, more commonly, by matching crime scene DNA with DNA profiles in a database in an attempt to identify a suspect or a family member of a suspect. Neither of these efforts implicates the Fourth Amendment, because the Supreme Court has held that a Fourth Amendment "search" does not occur unless police infringe "expectations of privacy society is prepared to recognize as reasonable" and has construed that phrase narrowly, without reference to …


Police As Community Caretakers: Caniglia V. Strom, Christopher Slobogin Jan 2021

Police As Community Caretakers: Caniglia V. Strom, Christopher Slobogin

Vanderbilt Law School Faculty Publications

What is the proper role of the police? That question has been at the forefront of debates about policing for quite some time, but especially in the past year. One answer, spurred by countless news stories about black people killed by law enforcement officers, is that the power of the police should be reduced to the bare minimum, with some in the Defund the Police movement calling for outright abolition of local police departments. Toward the other end of the spectrum is the notion that the role of the police in modern society is and must be capacious. Police should …


Up In The Cloud: Finding Common Ground In Providing For Law Enforcement Access To Data Held By Cloud Computing Service Providers, Matthew Mckenna Jan 2016

Up In The Cloud: Finding Common Ground In Providing For Law Enforcement Access To Data Held By Cloud Computing Service Providers, Matthew Mckenna

Vanderbilt Journal of Transnational Law

Cloud computing is an everyday part of the modern world; a technology that is increasingly transcending international borders. Disregarding international borders allows cloud computing to operate more efficiently and thus provides better service to users. Yet, the global nature of cloud computing raises a question--what happens if multiple countries apply facially similar laws to cloud computing providers differently? This scenario is common, especially in the context of law enforcement seeking access to cloud computing data. The United States and the United Kingdom have similar laws regarding the government's ability to acquire users' data. Importantly, neither law explicitly addresses the question …


The Double-Helix Double-Edged Sword: Comparing Dna Retention Policies Of The United States And The United Kingdom, Erica S. Deray Jan 2011

The Double-Helix Double-Edged Sword: Comparing Dna Retention Policies Of The United States And The United Kingdom, Erica S. Deray

Vanderbilt Journal of Transnational Law

Forensic scientists have used DNA profiling technologies to link suspects to crimes since Alec Jeffreys first proposed the idea in the 1970s. Recognizing the potential for using DNA databases to solve crimes and to prevent future crimes, England and Wales attempted to greatly expand its DNA database by allowing for the collection and indefinite retention of DNA profiles from arrestees. The European Court of Human Rights, however, issued a ruling in 2008 in the case of S. & Marper v. United Kingdom, advising the United Kingdom to restrict use of DNA profiles from arrestees and to establish time frames for …


Subpoenas And Privacy, Christopher Slobogin Jan 2005

Subpoenas And Privacy, Christopher Slobogin

Vanderbilt Law School Faculty Publications

This symposium article, the first of two on regulation of government's efforts to obtain paper and digital records of our activities, analyzes the constitutional legitimacy of subpoenas. Whether issued by a grand jury or an administrative agency, subpoenas are extremely easy to enforce, merely requiring the government to demonstrate that the items sought pursuant to the subpoena are "relevant" to a investigation. Yet today subpoenas and pseudo-subpoenas are routinely used not only to obtain business records and the like, but also documents containing significant amounts of personal information about individuals, including medical, financial, and email records. Part I provides an …


Protecting Privacy On The Front Page: Why Restrictions On Commercial Use Of Law Enforcement Records Violate The First Amendment, Jason L. Cagle Oct 1999

Protecting Privacy On The Front Page: Why Restrictions On Commercial Use Of Law Enforcement Records Violate The First Amendment, Jason L. Cagle

Vanderbilt Law Review

An individual is involved in an automobile accident and is arrested for driving under the influence. A few days after being re- leased, he receives several letters in the mail. One is from a chiropractor offering services to treat his injuries. Another is from an alcohol abuse treatment center. Yet another is from an attorney who defends traffic offenses. Each of the solicitors obtained the individual's name and address from publicly available records concerning the incident. The letters are truthful and not misleading, but utilize publicly available information for purely commercial purposes at the expense of the individual's privacy.

Several …


The Sheinbein Case And The Israeli-American Extradition Experience: A Need For Compromise, Abraham Abramovsky, Jonathan I. Edelstein Jan 1999

The Sheinbein Case And The Israeli-American Extradition Experience: A Need For Compromise, Abraham Abramovsky, Jonathan I. Edelstein

Vanderbilt Journal of Transnational Law

This Article will examine the political ramifications of the extradition process and the need for compromise to prevent domestic politics from undermining the ends of law enforcement. This Article will also suggest possible measures to ease the complications that extradition poses to international law enforcement cooperation. Part II of this Article will examine the facts of the most recent and dramatic example of the politics of extradition as played out in the Sheinbein case. Part III will analyze other issues which have placed obstacles in the path of practical law enforcement and international relations, and the way that the United …


Deceit, Pretext, And Trickery: Investigative Lies By The Police, Christopher Slobogin Jan 1997

Deceit, Pretext, And Trickery: Investigative Lies By The Police, Christopher Slobogin

Vanderbilt Law School Faculty Publications

This Article has been a preliminary effort at identifying those limitations in connection with one specific type of lie-investigative lies, or lies told to people in an effort to gather evidence against them. The extrapolation of Bok's analysis developed in this Article suggests that once an individual has been identified as a suspect through the public proxy of a judge, noncoercive deception in the investigative setting is often permissible. On the other hand, in the absence of such an identification, or when deception leads the dupe to believe he has no choice but to provide the soughtafter evidence, investigative lying …


Bribery Among The Korean Elite: Putting An End To A Cultural Ritual And Restoring Honor, Daniel Y. Jun Jan 1996

Bribery Among The Korean Elite: Putting An End To A Cultural Ritual And Restoring Honor, Daniel Y. Jun

Vanderbilt Journal of Transnational Law

On August 26, 1996, the criminal bribery convictions of two former South Korean Presidents sent shockwaves throughout the nation of South Korea. The court found former Presidents Chun Doo Hwan and Rof Tae Woo guilty of amassing hundreds of millions of dollars in bribes during their respective presidential terms. The court also found corporate executives of major Korean conglomerates guilty of bribing the former Presidents in exchange for government contracts or political favors. Such events invite a look into South Korea's difficult past, revealing a history of remarkable industrial progress tarnished by pervasive government corruption. This Note first explores South …


Testilying: Police Perjury And What To Do About It, Christopher Slobogin Jan 1996

Testilying: Police Perjury And What To Do About It, Christopher Slobogin

Vanderbilt Law School Faculty Publications

Police, like people generally, lie in all sorts of contexts for all sorts of reasons. This article has focused on police lying designed to convict individuals the police think are guilty. Strong measures are needed to reduce the powerful incentives to practice such testilying and the reluctance of prosecutors and judges to do anything about it. Among them might be the adoption of rewards for truth telling, the redefinition of probable cause, and the elimination of the exclusionary rule and its insidious effect on the resolve of legal actors to implement the commands of the Constitution. Ultimately, however, the various …


New York's Loyalty To The Spirit Of "Miranda": Simply The Best For Twenty-Five Years, Lorraine J. Adler Apr 1994

New York's Loyalty To The Spirit Of "Miranda": Simply The Best For Twenty-Five Years, Lorraine J. Adler

Vanderbilt Law Review

The landmark Supreme Court decision Miranda v. Arizona, recognized a defendant's right to be informed of the rights guaranteed by the Fifth Amendment's self-incrimination clause, including the right to counsel. The Miranda Court realized that a suspect may feel compelled to waive his Fifth Amendment privilege while in official detention. The Court held that the police must read the now-familiar warnings to a subject in custodial interrogation before he can waive his rights. Therefore, the Court in Miranda chose to strike the balance between effective law enforcement and protecting a subject's constitutional rights at the point of informing the subject …


The Changing Game: The United States Evolving Supply-Side Approach To Narcotics Trafficking, Gregory Wilson Jan 1994

The Changing Game: The United States Evolving Supply-Side Approach To Narcotics Trafficking, Gregory Wilson

Vanderbilt Journal of Transnational Law

Despite over two decades of focused government efforts, drug use and related problems persist in the United States. Moreover, combatting narcotics trafficking now may be more difficult than ever as the sophisticated Cali Cartel has replaced the Medellin Cartel as the world's preeminent supplier of cocaine. Cali's advanced methods of operation have rendered traditional approaches to battling drugs even less effective than they were previously. Clearly, the United States must establish a new direction in drug law enforcement. This Note traces the development of Colombia's drug cartels from the rise of the Medellin Cartel to the emergence of Cali as …


The Need For An International Criminal Court In The New International World Order, M. Cherif Bassiouni, Christopher L. Blakesley May 1992

The Need For An International Criminal Court In The New International World Order, M. Cherif Bassiouni, Christopher L. Blakesley

Vanderbilt Journal of Transnational Law

In this Article, Professors Bassiouni and Blakesley argue that the institution of an international criminal court would provide an effective means of dealing with international problems that are created by or unaddressed in a unilateral or bilateral international system. Rather than deflecting domestic concentration on law enforcement, the proposed tribunal will be a complementary and incremental effort, which will enhance criminal justice enforcement. The authors address several questions concerning the implementation of the tribunal, including questions related to sovereignty and bases for jurisdiction, which crimes will be within the court's jurisdiction, which law will apply to the cases, and practical …


Can We End The Shame?--Recent Multilateral Efforts To Address The World Child Pornography Market, Julia Foreman Jan 1990

Can We End The Shame?--Recent Multilateral Efforts To Address The World Child Pornography Market, Julia Foreman

Vanderbilt Journal of Transnational Law

In this Note, the author describes the United States and international child pornography markets. The author demonstrates how the United States Congress, judiciary, and law enforcement agencies have addressed the child pornography problem at the national and international level. In addition to the United States efforts to address this problem, the Netherlands, Denmark, and Thailand--who have all exported child pornography to the United States--have taken steps to curb the flow of child pornography. National and international child pornography markets continue to flourish, however, and the author concludes that more steps to eradicate child pornography are necessary. Finally, the author describes …


The Ker-Frisbie Doctrine: A Jurisdictional Weapon In The War On Drugs, Andrew B. Campbell Jan 1990

The Ker-Frisbie Doctrine: A Jurisdictional Weapon In The War On Drugs, Andrew B. Campbell

Vanderbilt Journal of Transnational Law

This Note addresses the ongoing use of extra legal apprehension, as applied under "Ker v. Illinois" and "Frisbie v. Collins," as a viable alternative to extradition in obtaining custody over those accused of exporting drugs to the United States. The author outlines the cultural and political reasons for the production of illicit drugs, examines the purposes and structures of formal extradition treaties and their effectiveness in bringing drug traffickers to trial, and considers the alternatives to formal extradition. The author concludes that extralegal apprehension, in both of its two forms--abduction and irregular rendition--should remain an alternative means of securing custody …


Privatization Of Corrections: Is The State Out On A Limb When The Company Goes Bankrupt?, Cathy E. Holley Mar 1988

Privatization Of Corrections: Is The State Out On A Limb When The Company Goes Bankrupt?, Cathy E. Holley

Vanderbilt Law Review

The incarceration of convicted criminals is an important matter to law enforcement officials and the public at large. Institutional correctional services consume significant governmental energy and resources. In 1983 corrections, including jails, prisons, probation, and parole, cost over 10.4 billion dollars. In 1985 approximately 503,000 people were imprisoned in federal and state correctional facilities.' The provision of prison services must occur on a continuous basis, and space must be available for every convicted criminal. As certain commentators have noted, "[o]ne cannot simply let offenders wait in line for an opening."'Historically, local, state, and federal government has overseen and operated our …


The Collateral Consequences Of A Criminal Conviction, Thomas R. Mccoy Oct 1970

The Collateral Consequences Of A Criminal Conviction, Thomas R. Mccoy

Vanderbilt Law Review

As a general matter [civil disability law] has simply not been rationally designed to accommodate the varied interests of society and the individual convicted person. There has been little effort to evaluate the whole system of disabilities and disqualifications that has grown up. ...As a result, convicted persons are generally subjected to numerous disabilities and disqualifications which have little relation to the crime committed, the person committing it or,consequently, the protection of society. They are often harsh out of all proportion to the crime committed.


Book Notes, Law Review Staff Oct 1969

Book Notes, Law Review Staff

Vanderbilt Law Review

The Child Savers: The Invention of Delinquency By Anthony M. Platt Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1969. Pp. ix, 202.$8.50.

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Juvenile Delinquency and Urban Areas (rev. ed.) By Clifford R.Shaw & Henry D. McKay Chicago: University of Chicago Press,1969. Pp. 394.

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The Positive School of Criminology Edited by Stanley E. Grupp Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 1968. Pp. vi, 114. $5.95.

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State and Local Tax Problems Edited by Harry L. Johnson Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 1969. Pp. xiii, 190. $7.50.

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Tension in the Cities By James A. Bayton Philadelphia: Chilton Book Co., 1969. Pp. x, …


Criminal Law Administration Prior To Trial: Recent Constitutional Developments, Paul H. Sanders Jun 1951

Criminal Law Administration Prior To Trial: Recent Constitutional Developments, Paul H. Sanders

Vanderbilt Law Review

Probably the most pervasive dilemma in human experience is that which poses the choice with respect to the use of normally-condemned means in order to attain what are considered to be desirable ends. The field of criminal law administration offers a particularly apt illustration of the dilemma in modern society. The actual, day-to-day methods of operation of our law enforcement officers, prosecutors, judges and other officials concerned with the investigation, trial and punishment of those charged with crime,--all reflect the choice that has been made in fact by our society. We can each judge, within the limits of our experience, …